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(Deadspin)   Ultrarunners discover performance-enhancing power of mid-race alcohol. "My hip flexors were really tired. I thought I'd have to walk the next 30 miles, but I had my flask with me and at about mile 25, I thought, time for a bourbon and Coke"   (fittish.deadspin.com ) divider line
    More: Hero, hip flexors, sports drink, diuretics, Kroger  
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1515 clicks; posted to Sports » on 05 Aug 2014 at 8:52 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-05 06:58:37 PM  
Hey, it works with the job. Why not?
 
2014-08-05 07:47:02 PM  
It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.
 
2014-08-05 07:56:39 PM  

Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.


I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?
 
2014-08-05 08:04:16 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?


I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."
 
2014-08-05 08:06:48 PM  
And also "how many bananas can I eat at once?"
 
2014-08-05 08:07:46 PM  

Cake Hunter: Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?

I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."


If you have the time and inclination, click through the article to the inline story link.  An ultra runner talks about his experience at hard rock.  Not once did he mention thinking, "this is stupid", though he did mention things like just wanting to live at several points.
 
2014-08-05 08:23:49 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?


I occasionally work with a guy who runs 100-200 mile ultras. One day we were working an event a week after he did a 200 mile run. He had those super padded old man with diabeetus shoes and was hunched over like a 90 year old. He's generally in great shape and he says it's the greatest feeling in the world, until the aches set in. I'm extremely impressed with his efforts, but it takes a special kind of crazy.
 
2014-08-05 08:51:25 PM  
I consider a 5k the limit of my running endurance.  If you need to go farther than that, we've got gas powered vehicles.
 
2014-08-05 09:10:24 PM  
It's called the beer scooter.
 
2014-08-05 09:11:05 PM  
www.centives.net
I just felt like drinking.
 
2014-08-05 09:14:17 PM  
Some of the most fun I've had drinking has been with ultra-runners. I've done a few beer miles...definitely fun, not performance enhancing.

/not very csb
 
2014-08-05 09:20:08 PM  
Wouldn't dehydration be kind of an issue?
 
2014-08-05 09:36:40 PM  
A couple weeks ago I accepted a beer from a spectator about halfway through the run of a half ironman. It certainly didn't make me run any worse. A couple years ago I accepted a beer on the mountain bike section of an XTERRA triathlon. Promptly endoed. Didn't spill the beer much. In the early days of the tour de france riders drank all the time. Of course, they also took arsenic....
 
2014-08-05 09:46:45 PM  

ginandbacon: Wouldn't dehydration be kind of an issue?


Nope. Water is planted ahead.

I know a long distance runner, and he swears endorphins kick in on a level we don't we know. It's kinda like heroin.
 
2014-08-05 09:50:36 PM  

Cake Hunter: Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?

I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."


That's how people completed le Tour de France in the old days.

It works, it's nothing new.
 
2014-08-05 09:55:36 PM  
It worked for rowing viking longships.
 
2014-08-05 09:57:27 PM  

spawn73: Cake Hunter: Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?

I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."

That's how people completed le Tour de France in the old days.

It works, it's nothing new.

eugenebicyclist.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-08-05 09:59:41 PM  
I thought, time for a bourbon and Coke half of a tab of acid.

/also an acceptable answer
//not condoning any illicit substances
///as your attorney I advise you train more and eat better
 
2014-08-05 10:04:49 PM  
I run quite a bit of road races but never did an ultra.   I know at the more prestigious races runners are not allowed to accept food or drink that you did not carry on your person or does not come from an official aid station  or they are disqualified.  This means if you take a piece of candy or a beer from a random guy in the crowd or even from your wife waiting for you at mile 20 you are DQ'd.   So, I'm wondering if this guy crossed that line by taking the unofficial booze?  Or maybe Ultra runners just aren't as uptight?

www.nycgo.com
 
2014-08-05 10:18:17 PM  
Had to re-read the headline. Thought it said "Ultramarines."
 
2014-08-05 10:24:34 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: I consider a 5k the limit of my running endurance.  If you need to go farther than that, we've got gas powered vehicles.


I'll run a half mile and say fark it I'm riding my bike.

/drunk cycling is hard
 
2014-08-05 10:29:59 PM  

The Green Intern: Had to re-read the headline. Thought it said "Ultramarines."


Would be Wolves, not the prissy UMs.
 
2014-08-05 11:00:51 PM  
Crown Royal and that Code Red Mt. Dew
 
2014-08-05 11:11:03 PM  
It worked for Babe Ruth.
 
2014-08-05 11:11:49 PM  

djkutch: spawn73: Cake Hunter: Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?

I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."

That's how people completed le Tour de France in the old days.

It works, it's nothing new.
[eugenebicyclist.files.wordpress.com image 800x724]


They're about 11/10 on the manly scale.
 
2014-08-05 11:14:11 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?


If you haven't already, read that book "Born to Run", it's a fun read. I'm not a runner by any stretch, but wow, after reading that, I wanted to jog everywhere. (It might be pronounced with a soft "J")
 
2014-08-05 11:14:23 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: I run quite a bit of road races but never did an ultra.   I know at the more prestigious races runners are not allowed to accept food or drink that you did not carry on your person or does not come from an official aid station  or they are disqualified.  This means if you take a piece of candy or a beer from a random guy in the crowd or even from your wife waiting for you at mile 20 you are DQ'd.   So, I'm wondering if this guy crossed that line by taking the unofficial booze?  Or maybe Ultra runners just aren't as uptight?


I don't know of any races that have a rule like that. It's certainly not a USATF rule (which is the largest running race certifier in the US). It's a good practice for elite runners not to take food or drink from someone they don't know -- if you're getting drug tested routinely, you tend to be pretty picky about what you put in your body, and you never want to just take a bottle and squirt it into your mouth without knowing what's in there. But if you're struggling and it's that or quit the race, most runners will take the chance.
 
2014-08-06 02:44:57 AM  

djkutch: ginandbacon: Wouldn't dehydration be kind of an issue?

Nope. Water is planted ahead.

I know a long distance runner, and he swears endorphins kick in on a level we don't we know. It's kinda like heroin.


Sounds like Republican math.
 
2014-08-06 03:11:49 AM  

crotchgrabber: Benevolent Misanthrope: Cake Hunter: It also helps give you the bright idea to run 100 miles in the first place.

I dunno - I kind of dig the idea.  I tend to be something of an all-or-nothing kind of person, so the idea of pushing myself to that length - even the idea of being  able to do that - is appealing on a certain level.  Can you imagine the physical condition those folks have to be in?

I occasionally work with a guy who runs 100-200 mile ultras. One day we were working an event a week after he did a 200 mile run. He had those super padded old man with diabeetus shoes and was hunched over like a 90 year old. He's generally in great shape and he says it's the greatest feeling in the world, until the aches set in. I'm extremely impressed with his efforts, but it takes a special kind of crazy.


Insert obligatory Robin Williams bit here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sZ_dZ22ukk

The album version had a better joke.

"I just ran 26 miles! 'Well, how do you feel?' I'm alive! I'm covered in my own shiat, but I'm alive!"
 
2014-08-06 05:37:33 AM  
Yup, most of the challenge with an ultra is mental, so you get people eating all kinds of junk to get their minds right.
30 miles in to the BigHorn 50, I stopped at an aid station and was feeling like quitting until a volunteer gave me a cup of miller light and some unevenly-heated lasagna. Normally I wouldn't like either of those things, but they hit just the right spots in my brain.

"Whoa, this lasagna is awesome. Can I get your recipe?"
"Lol, it's just that frozen stuff they sell at the grocery store"
"Omg, I wish we had the stores you have back home!"
 
2014-08-06 07:52:08 AM  

Cake Hunter: I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."


I get the this is just stupid thought about mile .25.

Because really, it's stupid to run for the sake of running.
 
2014-08-06 08:21:55 AM  

MugzyBrown: Cake Hunter: I'm training for a a marathon now. If I don't get too many injuries piling up, I might just keep going. I love it.

But I still have to believe at mile 80-something I would be thinking something like, "well, this is just stupid."

I get the this is just stupid thought about mile .25.

Because really, it's stupid to run for the sake of running.


stoplikingwhatIdontlike.jpg

I love running, but a half-marathon is my favorite distance. A beer after that is awesome. I really can't imagine drinking one during a run.
 
2014-08-06 08:45:30 AM  
I've been known to run to the bar.
 
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