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(Harper's Magazine)   Huge factors affecting how James Joyce wrote were his inflamed eyes, a shoulder boil, and dental abscesses, all caused by syphilis. Entertainment and Geek tabs battle over who has to touch this one   (harpers.org) divider line 24
    More: Sick, Trieste, peptic ulcers, James Joyce, iodine, jaundice, burden of diseases, College of Charleston, Leopold Bloom  
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923 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Aug 2014 at 9:18 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-05 04:44:13 AM  
That still doesn't explain Finnegan's Wake, although it comes closer than anything else I've seen.
 
2014-08-05 09:23:03 AM  
Joyce = Irish = drunk = definite effect on reality/writing
 
2014-08-05 09:25:49 AM  
seeemilywrite.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-08-05 09:32:22 AM  
My younger brother had to read Ulysses for a college class.  His comment:  "James Joyce was the world's first crack baby, wasn't he?"
 
2014-08-05 09:37:17 AM  
James Joyce: the Jackson Pollock of writing.
 
2014-08-05 09:38:47 AM  
Joyce is one of those artists I enjoy listening to academics discuss much more than I enjoy studying his work myself.
 
2014-08-05 09:45:53 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: My younger brother had to read Ulysses for a college class.  His comment:  "James Joyce was the world's first crack baby, wasn't he?"


I try to read Ulysses every couple of years and I don't think I've ever made it even a quarter way through.
 
2014-08-05 09:52:16 AM  
My only exposure to Joyce was through a stage adaptation of The Dead. Let's just say I'd rather sit through three hours of The Dude's landlord's Night on Bald Mountain interpretive dance routine than sit through that boring drek again. And this wasn't some East Whittier community theater production either, this was at the Ahmanson. I can't imagine what kind of emotional masochist one has to be to read one of his books.
 
2014-08-05 09:57:26 AM  
If you grew up in a land of constant wind and rain and had the two choices for finding comfort in either a church littered with pederasts or in alcohol, you'd probably end up much like he did.

Put a rubber johnny on that bod.
 
2014-08-05 10:02:44 AM  

Jaden Smith First of His Name: Pants full of macaroni!!: My younger brother had to read Ulysses for a college class.  His comment:  "James Joyce was the world's first crack baby, wasn't he?"

I try to read Ulysses every couple of years and I don't think I've ever made it even a quarter way through.


It's just a giant trolling of the literary world.
A multi-hundred page "Emporer's New Clothes."
 
2014-08-05 10:03:31 AM  
Here's to the new antibiotic-resistant syphilis. I'm looking forward to the literary revival.
 
2014-08-05 10:06:30 AM  
I think Roger Zelazny or Hunter Thompson's stream-of-consciousness stuff is way better than Joyce's.

Yeah, I went there.
 
2014-08-05 10:07:41 AM  
Dubliners is a great collection of READABLE works by James Joyce. Start there.
 
2014-08-05 10:12:38 AM  

xalres: My only exposure to Joyce was through a stage adaptation of The Dead. Let's just say I'd rather sit through three hours of The Dude's landlord's Night on Bald Mountain interpretive dance routine than sit through that boring drek again. And this wasn't some East Whittier community theater production either, this was at the Ahmanson. I can't imagine what kind of emotional masochist one has to be to read one of his books.


BUT IF YOU CAN'T ENJOY JOYCE, YOU ARE A HORRIBLE PERSON WHO DOESN'T KNOW GOOD LITERATURE!
 
2014-08-05 10:12:50 AM  
Maybe the inflamed eyes are why he called Jason Donald safe at first base.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-08-05 10:22:16 AM  

swaxhog: [seeemilywrite.files.wordpress.com image 600x417]


Still a better love story than Twilight.
 
2014-08-05 10:26:02 AM  
Given Joyce's history with prostitution in his early life, this wouldn't be surprising.

The author is correct, lots of people kept their history of syphilis a complete secret at the time.  In this case keep in mind that Joyce's work was being censored just because of what was in the texts.  More evidence of his personal immorality probably might have successfully tipped it into territory in which publishers couldn't defend undertaking it.  What was already known of his personal life was bad enough.

Henry Chapman Mercer, an American heir and arts figure went through a similar story.  In his case, he went to Europe as a young man, contracted VD, then spent the rest of his life living as a kind of cloistered eccentric.  It wasn't until well after his death that his biographers put two and two together, and even then it was kind of talked about in hushed tones.  He obviously wanted it kept private in life.  It was unclear what benefit there was in revealing it after his death.
 
2014-08-05 10:32:45 AM  
The :In Our Time:Culture" podcast achieve has a couple of episodes about Joyce if anyone is interested.
 
2014-08-05 10:40:55 AM  
I enjoy reading Joyce. I know; that makes me a pretentious, snobby, poopy-head. Bit I still like reading James Joyce. So there.
 
2014-08-05 01:50:23 PM  
Huge factors affecting how James Joyce wrote were his inflamed eyes, a shoulder boil, and dental abscesses, all caused by syphilis.

I can;t be bothered to read the article, but does it mention the likelihood that the strongest affect on his writing was probably from the BRAIN DAMAGE that was caused by syphilis?

Because that's about the only thing that can truly explain the voluminous piles of sheer unadulterated dross he spewed forth and called Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake
 
2014-08-05 03:04:22 PM  
Joyce is great, but only if you view him through the lens of how he stretched language. The biggest compliment/criticism I'd have for him is that he is a "writer's writer's writer." There are moments in Ulysses that are linguistically interesting and the story has some moments, but it all gets neutered from the dazzling virtuosity. Kind of like you appreciate Paganini but you don't get emotionally moved with his compositions. Finnegans Wake is good to dip into at any time and study individual sentences, if you like wordplay and riddles.
 
2014-08-05 03:23:43 PM  

Mawson of the Antarctic: Joyce is great, but only if you view him through the lens of how he stretched language. The biggest compliment/criticism I'd have for him is that he is a "writer's writer's writer." There are moments in Ulysses that are linguistically interesting and the story has some moments, but it all gets neutered from the dazzling virtuosity. Kind of like you appreciate Paganini but you don't get emotionally moved with his compositions. Finnegans Wake is good to dip into at any time and study individual sentences, if you like wordplay and riddles.


Cant it also be said that he was writing in response to his contemporaries and that needs to be kept in mind when looking back at his work. Reading it in isolation without knowing why he decided to write that way misses part of the last allure for people.

I thought I remember hearing that but I could have it wrong.
 
2014-08-05 07:03:52 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: I think Roger Zelazny or Hunter Thompson's stream-of-consciousness stuff is way better than Joyce's.

Yeah, I went there.


Don't be surprised if you're alone.
 
2014-08-06 02:16:24 AM  
I like Hunter Thompson.
 
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