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(TreeHugger)   Hej Cyklist, Dutch speedometer will tell you how fast to ride on bicycle highway to keep hitting the green light   (treehugger.com) divider line 21
    More: Cool, LEDs, Copenhagen, tree huggers, urbanism  
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648 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Aug 2014 at 6:13 AM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-05 06:14:04 AM  
Is that headline a translation straight from Dutch?
 
2014-08-05 06:41:28 AM  
Or you could just go around the green light.
 
Xai
2014-08-05 06:48:48 AM  
Got to say, I think that's a great idea
 
2014-08-05 06:54:03 AM  
We have a lot of highways around here with timed lights and it is great.  The problem is the jack poles who drive over the speed limit.  They get stopped by the red light up ahead.  When the people driving the proper speed catch up they all have to slow down while the jack pole accelerates to get back up to speed.
 
2014-08-05 07:21:00 AM  
Because cyclists care about traffic lights.
 
2014-08-05 07:32:25 AM  
I want something on my car that turns all lights in my path green. No one is more important than me, wherever I'm going is urgent, and thus you can all wait. While I'm at it, why should public transport get priority on roads? They're all people who never learned to work hard enough to own a car, or create jobs. Why are they more important? They're not. Blow up all buses.

I don't mind cyclists though, just don't try and act like the road is equally yours. This is my road.

Mine!
 
2014-08-05 07:54:05 AM  
www.aaroncampbell.org
 
2014-08-05 08:54:26 AM  

Muta: We have a lot of highways around here with timed lights and it is great.  The problem is the jack poles who drive over the speed limit.  They get stopped by the red light up ahead.  When the people driving the proper speed catch up they all have to slow down while the jack pole accelerates to get back up to speed.


What they need to do is drive twice the speed limit
 
2014-08-05 09:11:08 AM  
Danish, not Dutch, dumbmitter
 
2014-08-05 09:13:36 AM  
Sort of related, in Buenos Aires, they have certain boulevards with 'Onda Verde' or green wave.  You can travel pretty good distances across the a very large, hard to traverse, city without hitting a light.

I wish they'd do something similar in Philly.  There are a couple of streets in Old City with this, but going up or down Broad Street is ridiculous with the number of lights you'll hit.
 
2014-08-05 09:16:24 AM  
It's pretty impressive that 42% of trips in their city are by bicycle.

Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.
 
2014-08-05 09:38:16 AM  

Target Builder: Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.


The explanation for this is that drivers in this country are freaking psycho.  I struggled for the longest time with riding my bike to work (10 miles each way on mostly flat land) not because of the distance, but because I barely feel safe in a car on some of the roads here, let alone exposed on a bike.

Drivers around here will tailgate you until they can pass you, even if you're hovering around the limit, to speed to a red light five seconds sooner, at 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning.  I'm surprised there isn't an epidemic of heart attacks around here for how stressed-out people make themselves driving around back roads.  And that's happened while I was driving, not biking.

It took talking to a lot of bikers, and a few lectures on climate change, before I finally gathered up the guts to start doing it myself.  I'm still frequently nervous about it, but the benefits outweigh my discomfort with it, at least for right now.

/wish I had more bicycle highways around here to make such a device useful
 
2014-08-05 09:59:04 AM  
That's why we never go to Danmark, especially København. Their Dutch is atrocious.
 
2014-08-05 10:25:45 AM  

Target Builder: It's pretty impressive that 42% of trips in their city are by bicycle.

Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.


They don't wear helmets in Denmark either.  Based on the helmet fanatics in the US, you'd think they'd be cycling through a rivers of brain goo.
 
2014-08-05 10:32:04 AM  

Fritriac: Danish, not Dutch, dumbmitter


There are only two things I hate in this world...
 
2014-08-05 10:53:41 AM  

Muta: Target Builder: It's pretty impressive that 42% of trips in their city are by bicycle.

Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.

They don't wear helmets in Denmark either.  Based on the helmet fanatics in the US, you'd think they'd be cycling through a rivers of brain goo.


I imagine the need for s helmet drops a bit when you have drivers who are well aware of cyclists and a well designed cycle lane network to provide extensive routes with low risk of getting knocked off your bike.
 
2014-08-05 11:07:34 AM  
In SF many lights are timed, as long as you only go the speed limit you'll hit some great streaks of green.
 
2014-08-05 11:09:12 AM  

Target Builder: Muta: Target Builder: It's pretty impressive that 42% of trips in their city are by bicycle.

Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.

They don't wear helmets in Denmark either.  Based on the helmet fanatics in the US, you'd think they'd be cycling through a rivers of brain goo.

I imagine the need for s helmet drops a bit when you have drivers who are well aware of cyclists and a well designed cycle lane network to provide extensive routes with low risk of getting knocked off your bike.


The Dutch also all have like 50 lb tank bikes meant for commuting. Since there are no hills, the bike's weight doesn't matter. They ride in a more mellow way, aren't going as fast when they fall, and have less run-ins with cars, because many less cars.
 
2014-08-05 11:12:35 AM  
I mean there are probably more cars in the bay area (esp if we include Sac) then all of the netherlands.
 
2014-08-06 03:06:55 AM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: Target Builder: Muta: Target Builder: It's pretty impressive that 42% of trips in their city are by bicycle.

Even the most cycle friendly cities in the US struggle to get into the high single digits.

They don't wear helmets in Denmark either.  Based on the helmet fanatics in the US, you'd think they'd be cycling through a rivers of brain goo.

I imagine the need for s helmet drops a bit when you have drivers who are well aware of cyclists and a well designed cycle lane network to provide extensive routes with low risk of getting knocked off your bike.

The Dutch also all have like 50 lb tank bikes meant for commuting.


We're called Danes, and no, we don't.

and have less run-ins with cars, because many less cars.

And because we have seperate bikelanes, special traffic lights for bikes, and drivers who pay attention to cyclist.
 
2014-08-06 03:44:28 AM  

Uchiha_Cycliste: Since there are no hills, the bike's weight doesn't matter.


We have hills, and even on a flat road, of course the weight of the bicycle matters.

They ride in a more mellow way,

And this is how I know you've never biked through Copenhagen during rush hour.
 
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