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(Orlando Sentinel)   Parents have no issue with sending their children to a school that received an "F" rating, but tell them they may have to get uniforms for their underachieving students and suddenly they give a damn   (orlandosentinel.com) divider line 152
    More: Florida  
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5160 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2014 at 1:11 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-03 11:27:00 PM  
I'll buy the ones that can't afford uniforms two sets if they promise to STFU.
 
2014-08-03 11:44:44 PM  
Perhaps there is a relationship between their attitudes and the poorly performing students?

/nah
 
2014-08-03 11:52:15 PM  
So far this time the criticism has centered on cost and the short notice.

THIS IS AN OUTR-zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
 
2014-08-04 12:05:50 AM  
FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.
 
2014-08-04 12:08:05 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.


This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.
 
2014-08-04 12:36:35 AM  

feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.


Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.
 
2014-08-04 12:39:55 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.


Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.
 
2014-08-04 12:51:16 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.


If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.
 
2014-08-04 12:53:42 AM  
Tax free weekend here was Aug 1-3 same as in FLA apparently.
It wasn't the entire week.
 
2014-08-04 12:56:26 AM  

optikeye: Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.


It would be nice to see a farker do something so kind, especially something that will probably cost tens of thousands of dollars.  feckingmorons might get a positive story about Fark on the news.
 
2014-08-04 01:16:48 AM  

SphericalTime: optikeye: Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.

It would be nice to see a farker do something so kind, especially something that will probably cost tens of thousands of dollars.  feckingmorons might get a positive story about Fark on the news.


We could set something up and donate. I'd kick in a few bucks. I can see the need.
 
2014-08-04 01:22:54 AM  

feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.



A lot of poor people buy at the first of the month when they still have some paycheck left, or buy when they end up with an "extra" paycheck in a given month (e.g., a calendar month that results in three paychecks rather than two).
 
2014-08-04 01:23:11 AM  

sethen320: SphericalTime: optikeye: Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.

It would be nice to see a farker do something so kind, especially something that will probably cost tens of thousands of dollars.  feckingmorons might get a positive story about Fark on the news.

We could set something up and donate. I'd kick in a few bucks. I can see the need.


I'm in.  I bet the parents will continue to biatch about something, anything at all, instead of facing the simple fact that their kids are failing in school and they aren't any farking help because they don't care.  In other words, they fail as parents.  However, I'd love to be proven wrong.
 
2014-08-04 01:24:11 AM  

sethen320: SphericalTime: optikeye: Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.

It would be nice to see a farker do something so kind, especially something that will probably cost tens of thousands of dollars.  feckingmorons might get a positive story about Fark on the news.

We could set something up and donate. I'd kick in a few bucks. I can see the need.


Sounds like an idea for a kickstarter
 
2014-08-04 01:26:37 AM  
Why should we donate when someone already said they'd pay the entire bill.


Unless.

feckingmorons: they are lying

 
2014-08-04 01:27:46 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.



In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.
 
2014-08-04 01:31:09 AM  
Just make the school uniform consist of saggy jorts and oversized t-shirts with bedazzled crowns and shiat on 'em, and wah lah, all the students already have uniforms
 
2014-08-04 01:32:12 AM  
Making the shiats wear uniforms won't make them any smarter or improve their standardized test scores.
How about the school worry about something productive?
 
2014-08-04 01:36:28 AM  

ReverendJasen: Making the shiats wear uniforms won't make them any smarter or improve their standardized test scores.
How about the school worry about something productive?


It helps them concentrate more in class and removes a potential element for distraction and discipline issues.
 
2014-08-04 01:38:02 AM  

FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.


X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.
 
2014-08-04 01:39:20 AM  
CSB:

When I was in sixth grade my family moved from the Tampa Bay area to Silicon Valley.

I am not an idiot by any means, but I was almost a year behind in math based on florida vs. California standards. I had to do a shiat ton of extra work to not be held back. The last thing florida needs to be worrying about is uniforms.
 
2014-08-04 01:39:21 AM  

optikeye: Bathia_Mapes: I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

Fecking said he would do it....get in him in touch with the school board and the parents. You should have his name...he said he would do it...MAKE IT HAPPEN.


He might even get on FarkTV!
 
2014-08-04 01:42:23 AM  

ReverendJasen: FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


That kid you are buying supplies for, he or his classmate will one day be deciding whether or not you can still carry on a life worth living if you have XXX surgery. Let's provide funds for his education.
 
2014-08-04 01:42:41 AM  

ReverendJasen:  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


It wouldn't surprise me.
 
2014-08-04 01:44:07 AM  
Never been a big fan of school uniforms. Private schools can do as they like, but I never really liked it for public schools.
 
2014-08-04 01:45:38 AM  

jst3p: CSB:

When I was in sixth grade my family moved from the Tampa Bay area to Silicon Valley.

I am not an idiot by any means, but I was almost a year behind in math based on florida vs. California standards. I had to do a shiat ton of extra work to not be held back. The last thing florida needs to be worrying about is uniforms.


Different states, school districts, and even schools often teach things in different orders.  In my high school the social studies curriculum was 9th grade - US History, 10th - Civics and Economics, and 11th - World History.  Other districts did things in a different order, so sometimes kids transferring in would be put into classes with different grade levels to bring things back in sync.

That's one of the big reasons behind the push towards Common Core - to standardize the order in which things are taught nationwide so that comparisons between states can be made more easily, and so that students who transfer between schools, districts, and states, will have an easier time picking up where the left off.
 
2014-08-04 01:46:05 AM  

jst3p: CSB:

When I was in sixth grade my family moved from the Tampa Bay area to Silicon Valley.

I am not an idiot by any means, but I was almost a year behind in math based on florida vs. California standards. I had to do a shiat ton of extra work to not be held back. The last thing florida needs to be worrying about is uniforms.


I had the opposite.  Moved from Chicago to central Louisiana after third grade.  It was about a year before I hit any math I didn't see, and I felt leagues ahead of the other kids in the other subjects.

But that could have just been because I read a book every now and then.  Reading wasn't stigmatized in my first school, but certainly was in LA.
 
2014-08-04 01:47:51 AM  

jst3p: That kid you are buying supplies for, he or his classmate will one day be deciding whether or not you can still carry on a life worth living if you have XXX surgery. Let's provide funds for his education.



I'm happy to pay property taxes (at about $500/month, far cheaper than coastal Califoria, New Jersey, etc., but nothing to snicker at) to support quality public education, but clearly what we're paying in taxes isn't enough to support schools if parents have to buy supplies that the school district should have to pay for.

Heck, it would be better if we just wrote a check at the beginning of the school year and had the school buy supplies directly: it would be more efficient, and the school could get a wholesale discount, which would make supplies cheaper, too.  The system, as is, is broken.
 
2014-08-04 01:47:54 AM  
Know who else liked all the kids to dress the same?

2.bp.blogspot.com

www.democratic-republicans.us
 
2014-08-04 01:49:28 AM  
I'll have my wife put on her uniform and I'll make an impartial assessment of the potential benefits of their use.


See ya later.
 
2014-08-04 02:00:10 AM  
My Sons high school does not have that uniform rule, that ,many other cities have. I remember when back in another state, it was enacted, and people whined, but it still went into effect.  They find a way. Parents saying they have so much money, yet can't afford to take care of their own crotch fruit, because it impacts their ability, and I'm not kidding, I've seen it, their ability, because they've budgeted X amount of money for liquor.
 
2014-08-04 02:02:09 AM  
a.dilcdn.com
 
2014-08-04 02:07:26 AM  

jst3p: That kid you are buying supplies for, he or his classmate will one day be deciding whether or not you can still carry on a life worth living if you have XXX surgery. Let's provide funds for his education.


We're not buying supplies for kids whose parents' are poor.  We're buying consumable supplies for the school to use.  Things that the school should already have.

Cut the goddamn military budget, stop giving tax breaks to corporations intent on farking us over, and farking fund the educational system again.

Asshole Republicans want to biatch about their tax money going to schools?  Well this is what you get when that gets cut, you morons.  You now get to pay more money out of pocket directly to the school just so they can afford toilet paper so your kid can wipe his ass.
 
2014-08-04 02:11:19 AM  

FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.


Schools in California most certainly do *not* provide school supplies. It's possible that some schools do, but my child had never been given free school supplies from school ever.
In California, low-income families do get free uniforms if a school uniform policy is in place at the school. Some are hand-me-downs, but most must be bought with the school's money, since they are required to provide them to needy children. I've volunteered at a school that had quite a bit of low-income students, and the principal was forced to do away with things such as soap and paper towels in the bathrooms and tissues in the classroom to buy uniforms. NCLB punishes a low-performing school by taking away funding, which makes it even harder on the already struggling school, then some well-meaning but stupid person suggests a uniform policy and the school goes even more broke trying to pay for uniforms. How does that make sense?
 
2014-08-04 02:17:16 AM  

FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.


It's the same in Maryland, and I'm talking Montgomery County which is one of the most affluent counties in the country. Also in AZ your buying the same type of supplies. I don't mind but I can see the extra $100 would impact someone on a fixed income.

As to the uniforms...let's see how many of these kids are coming to school in $100 Nike's or $20-30 shirts and jeans because it's what they "have" to wear. My kids go to a charter school that requires uniforms and it's a whole lot cheaper going back to school shopping. Having fashion as a distraction isn't an issue at the school my kids go to and I'm all for it and IMHO it does make a difference.
 
2014-08-04 02:19:50 AM  
www.dvice.com
Just because it was random.
 
2014-08-04 02:22:24 AM  
cdn2.fashionablygeek.com
And this one because it is random and creepy.
 
2014-08-04 02:31:30 AM  

TheLondonLook: Schools in California most certainly do *not* provide school supplies. It's possible that some schools do, but my child had never been given free school supplies from school ever.


Our daughter's school in Los Angeles provided all supplies.
 
2014-08-04 02:38:51 AM  

vicioushobbit: jst3p: CSB:

When I was in sixth grade my family moved from the Tampa Bay area to Silicon Valley.

I am not an idiot by any means, but I was almost a year behind in math based on florida vs. California standards. I had to do a shiat ton of extra work to not be held back. The last thing florida needs to be worrying about is uniforms.

I had the opposite.  Moved from Chicago to central Louisiana after third grade.  It was about a year before I hit any math I didn't see, and I felt leagues ahead of the other kids in the other subjects.

But that could have just been because I read a book every now and then.  Reading wasn't stigmatized in my first school, but certainly was in LA.


Yeah but didn't you know that they should be in control of their own standards and they don't need common core to keep up with everyone else just a little and furthermore
 
2014-08-04 02:44:19 AM  

SouthParkCon: As to the uniforms...let's see how many of these kids are coming to school in $100 Nike's or $20-30 shirts and jeans because it's what they "have" to wear. My kids go to a charter school that requires uniforms and it's a whole lot cheaper going back to school shopping. Having fashion as a distraction isn't an issue at the school my kids go to and I'm all for it and IMHO it does make a difference.


It's the way of the world, mate. You're judged on clothes. Look like a slob people will respond to that. Hiding kids behind the facade of a jumper or a button up shirt doesn't stop that.

Beside, in every school I've ever been at with uniforms the number one thing everyone who cares does is trying to differentiate themselves somehow - jewelry, accessories, hair things, wrist bands, watches, whatever. Kids like to be personalized. If they didn't, where would the market be for Bort licence plates?
 
2014-08-04 02:50:01 AM  
Uniforms are going to fix the problem how?
 
2014-08-04 02:53:34 AM  
I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.
 
2014-08-04 02:53:45 AM  

FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.


Welcome to almost every school district in America.
 
2014-08-04 02:56:56 AM  

ReverendJasen: FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


hehehe. I work selling office supplies.

It's an absolute nightmare filling these lists. I break them down into 3 types

1) The reasonable list - school supplies, maybe a box of tissues. Otherwise, it's just a list of supplies. They're remarkably close to the generic "This is what you need for an 8th grader" lists we have. These are increasingly rare.

2) The Hyper-Specific - "The student must have 3 1/2" round-ring 3-ring binders binders in red, yellow and blue with inserts" Problem: I've worked in office supplies for 10 years. We have never sold red blue and yellow 1/2 binders. 1/2" binders are business tools, they come in black and white. (the easy fix: A white one with colored paper inserts.). The reason for the insanity? The teachers are so obsessed with putting the student into a single organizational method that they color code and specify brands on everything. My favorite was one list this year that demanded 3 subject Mead plastic-front, plastic ringed notebooks. I've never seen them except on Amazon. I know this woulda killed me, I never liked that level of organization. Another one they love throwing: Demanding only Ticonderoga pre-sharpened pencils (that cost 6.50 a box of 20, compared to my store's 10 back unsharpened pencils, for a dollar.)

3) The Supply Shop - these lists have a few things like notebooks and pencils, but honestly? Most of it is for the classroom. One local one this year requests 6 boxes of tissues per student. Personally, I can only assume the teacher stuffs her bra and is sweaty. Another demanded a large package of paper towels - the big ones you see people wheel out of Costco. My favorite was one that also wanted parents to provide rolls of colored paper for bulletin boards.
 
2014-08-04 02:59:46 AM  

real_headhoncho: And this one because it is random and creepy.


Haha that's awesome. In a weird Wtf pedo-vibe way.

Tom Bombadil is one FU€KED up dude.
 
2014-08-04 03:02:58 AM  

TheLondonLook: FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

Schools in California most certainly do *not* provide school supplies. It's possible that some schools do, but my child had never been given free school supplies from school ever.


I don't know how it is now in Michigan, but when I was still in school, the law there (state law) was that the school had to provide basic supplies such as paper and pencils and such as required by the course work.  There was a "within reason" threshold though.  I couldn't just go grab a ream of paper and a box of pencils whenever I liked.  Also, it only required providing the most basic resources required by the coursework.

If you needed folders or binders to hold your homework, additional pens, or other supplies beyond the basics, you were on your own.  IIRC, basic art supplies (tape, markers, poster board, etc.) were provided for the occasional activity that needed them.  But if you were in some extracurricular that needed them, then the school wasn't required to provide it.

In our particular district, we often oscillated between pay-to-play and school-funded extracurriculars (including band and choir) that depended on whether the most recent millage increase got approved.  Our district was always on the edge between the two.  They also played all sorts of crazy games with the length of the school day, class periods and lunch periods based on whether the millage passed.  In a good year everything was funded, we had 55 minute classes with 5 minutes passing time and a 35 minute lunch, giving a 6 1/2 hour day.  In a bad year, it was pay-to-play, 47 minute classes with 4 minutes passing-time, and a 28 minute lunch, giving a 5 1/2 hour day.  Or something like that.  That was over half a lifetime ago, so my memory is maybe a bit fuzzy.

Looking back, we had it fairly easy compared to the stories I hear these days.  Good grief.

Fund the dang schools!
 
2014-08-04 03:05:39 AM  

TheMysticS: FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

Welcome to almost every school district in America.


Ha. My local district, here in the wealthiest few townships in Johnson County, KS faced having to lay off it's entire arts dept. The locals were all
"lol, no, we'll just pay for that shiat ourselves, it costs nothing". The state said no. Other towns, on both sides of the state line chimed in saying it was unfair that we could do so. We took it to court. The state lost. Hard. Now the arts dept. is funded, salaries and supplies for years. Good times.
 
2014-08-04 03:11:12 AM  

gadian: I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.


Don't have kids, do ya?

Seriously, if you do, and you don't buy what is asked for, another parent has to pick up the slack.
Lots of parents bought very little on the lists- sometimes not enough for their own child's work.
They always count on others to pick up their slack-these types- and they don't care. I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent wouldn't do it, or told their kid no, or cancelled at the last minute. Poor babies, embarrassed and sad.
 
2014-08-04 03:20:30 AM  

TheMysticS: Don't have kids, do ya?


I do.  I'm just not going to provide a teacher's wishlist of supplies.  You can teach without fancy colored markers, multi-colored papers, 25 gigantor bottles of hand sanitizer, 25 economy sized boxes of kleenex and a million little tabs of velcro stickies all over the walls. If the teacher feels they need those to teach, they can purchase them.  I'll pay higher property taxes to purchase those things with, but I won't give personal handouts to teachers.
 
2014-08-04 04:07:07 AM  

gadian: TheMysticS: Don't have kids, do ya?

I do.  I'm just not going to provide a teacher's wishlist of supplies.  You can teach without fancy colored markers, multi-colored papers, 25 gigantor bottles of hand sanitizer, 25 economy sized boxes of kleenex and a million little tabs of velcro stickies all over the walls.


What's with all the hand sanitizer these days, anyway?  We never had that crap growing up.  Are they drinking it?

And Kleenex... that stuff's relatively expensive, even if you buy it in bulk, if you buy the name-brand Kleenex.  I bought the 48-pack of 125-tissue boxes, and even with the bulk discount it's about $1.70/box.  That really adds up quick!  If you buy individual boxes at the grocery store the prices are easily twice that or more per tissue.
 
2014-08-04 04:08:20 AM  
My wife is an elementary school teacher, so I'm really getting a kick...

The school she teaches at is low on the socio-economic scale. Plus, a lot of refugee families from faraway places. Last year, there were 11 diffferent languages spoken at the homes of the students just in her classroom; about FIFTY in the entire school.

It is rare for a student to have a 'decent' amount of school supplies on the first day. Now you want them to have uniforms? The 'School Supply Fairy' will be buying a boatload of pencils (unsharpened, but Ticonderoga - we're not animals), a hundred or so notebooks,gluesticks and Kleenex packs. And 25 of everything else.

I figure I spend a paycheck on various school supplies, visits to the Teacher Supply Store and books at the book fairs at school. And I'm at the school about 100 hours 'volunteering'.

I haven't bought copy paper or paper towels - yet.

/Looking forward to the first day of school
//I want to see the kids cry when mommy goes away.
///It's the same sound when they realize there's no candy in the van...
 
2014-08-04 04:09:07 AM  

im14u2c: gadian: TheMysticS: Don't have kids, do ya?

I do.  I'm just not going to provide a teacher's wishlist of supplies.  You can teach without fancy colored markers, multi-colored papers, 25 gigantor bottles of hand sanitizer, 25 economy sized boxes of kleenex and a million little tabs of velcro stickies all over the walls.

What's with all the hand sanitizer these days, anyway?  We never had that crap growing up.  Are they drinking it?

And Kleenex... that stuff's relatively expensive, even if you buy it in bulk, if you buy the name-brand Kleenex.  I bought the 48-pack of 125-tissue boxes, and even with the bulk discount it's about $1.70/box.  That really adds up quick!  If you buy individual boxes at the grocery store the prices are easily twice that or more per tissue.


Christ, man, how often are you jerking off? That's 6000 tissues.
 
2014-08-04 04:20:39 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.

Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.


Yes, I'm still awake so 'this week' means now (well about 4 hours ago it ended). However the article says they asked for an exemption last week: "Before board members could take up the contentious issue last week..."

So if they said they shopped last week and the tax free period was Aug 1 to Aug 3, they are lying.
 
2014-08-04 04:23:47 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Just make the school uniform consist of saggy jorts and oversized t-shirts with bedazzled crowns and shiat on 'em, and wah lah, all the students already have uniforms



assets.amuniversal.com
 
2014-08-04 04:26:30 AM  

FizixJunkee: TheLondonLook: Schools in California most certainly do *not* provide school supplies. It's possible that some schools do, but my child had never been given free school supplies from school ever.

Our daughter's school in Los Angeles provided all supplies.


I guess somehow you missed the part where I said that it's possible some schools do give supplies? Your child went to a California school where school supplies were given. My child has gone to 5 different schools in 3 different districts in two different cities that are 500 miles apart, and all those schools were in California.
So now we know that all children in California *are not* given school supplies.
 
2014-08-04 04:27:09 AM  

TheMysticS: I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent wouldn't do it


You're a sucker. Cupcakes aren't school supplies.
 
2014-08-04 04:36:00 AM  

robohobo: im14u2c: And Kleenex... that stuff's relatively expensive, even if you buy it in bulk, if you buy the name-brand Kleenex.  I bought the 48-pack of 125-tissue boxes, and even with the bulk discount it's about $1.70/box.  That really adds up quick!  If you buy individual boxes at the grocery store the prices are easily twice that or more per tissue.

Christ, man, how often are you jerking off? That's 6000 tissues.


*chuckle*

We have four cats, and I have allergies.  I blow my nose a lot, and clean up way too many hairballs.  In over a year we went through less than half of that bulk purchase, FWIW.  Closet space is cheap, though, so I figured why not buy bulk?

Point is, as made up-thread, it's better when the school can buy its own generic supplies and buy in bulk than if individuals pay retail for name brands.  Heck, I didn't even get that great of a deal from ULINE.  I'm sure a school district could do much better than I did when ordering school district sized quantities.
 
2014-08-04 04:47:31 AM  

TheMysticS: gadian: I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.

Don't have kids, do ya?

Seriously, if you do, and you don't buy what is asked for, another parent has to pick up the slack.
Lots of parents bought very little on the lists- sometimes not enough for their own child's work.
They always count on others to pick up their slack-these types- and they don't care. I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent wouldn't do it, or told their kid no, or cancelled at the last minute. Poor babies, embarrassed and sad.


So somebody told their child no to cupcakes for their birthday, and you took it upon yourself to purchase them? How did you even know when each and every child's birthday was, and whether or not their parents let them have cupcakes? Did you have rescue cupcakes with you every time you dropped your child off in the morning so you could save the day?
Maybe the parents said no because their child is allergic to an ingredient in store bought cupcakes, or is obese and prediabetic and shouldn't have any. Maybe the parents prefer to have cake and a nice dinner at home and don't want to waste 30 minutes of their child's learning time at school passing out and eating cupcakes. Shouldn't it be the parents choice what their child can and can't eat, and not yours?
 
2014-08-04 05:12:40 AM  

feckingmorons: I'll buy the ones that can't afford uniforms two sets if they promise to STFU.


That's really awesome of you. I can't wait to read about it in the local paper. It'd probably go national, I bet.
 
2014-08-04 05:30:14 AM  
For everyone on here talking about school supplies being provided or not provided by the schools, please allow me to contribute:

My mother teaches in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, at a school in a very affluent district. Every year, I get to see the supplies list for the following year, and every year it is essentially the same: pencils (pens aren't really welcome until the kids hit fifth grade), some folders, a binder, a pencil box for the various items, a basic calculator, blah blah blah. Nothing as anally-specific as 3-1/2" ring binder in blue, red, and yellow, etc.

And while the school provides a lot of stuff--copy paper, printer toner (laser printers! hallelujah!), enough Ticonderoga pencils to stuff an elephant's colon, and a great deal more--the school supply lists request parents bring in some very simple, not-at-all-ridiculous things for the classroom. Example: Parents are asked to bring two rolls of paper towels, a box of facial tissue (that's kleenex), a box of disinfecting wipes, and that's pretty much it. Apparently ,that request is fairly common throughout the parish for elementary schools, and no one has ever had a problem with it...that I've heard.

In exchange, the school provides things like, oh I don't know, books and friggin' computers. And desks. And chairs. And a bunch of teachers who give a rat's dick about their students.

Of course, this is a district where the superintendent does absolutely nothing and still makes four times what a highly-paid teacher does. And the same superintendent drives around in a brand-new SUV paid for by the school district because why the f**k not.

/Angry dome
//Will be in it for a while
 
2014-08-04 05:44:12 AM  

TheMysticS: I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent.... told their kid no,


I understand if the other parent said "Of course there will be cuppa cakes and iced creams and ponies oh my!" and then backed out you have to cover their slack in front of the kid.

But if the parent actually said "No. You're not getting a cupcake." maybe they had a reason.
 
2014-08-04 06:09:32 AM  
Most people don't really care about education. I live in a "superzip" with twenty or so soccer fields for our kids. The teachers are always fighting for supplies.

Americans care about cars, athleticism, and cars and athleticism on television. We should stop pretending we care about common outcomes in the classroom. We would then have an easier time allocating tax dollars.
 
2014-08-04 06:13:35 AM  

saintstryfe: 1) The reasonable list - school supplies, maybe a box of tissues. Otherwise, it's just a list of supplies. They're remarkably close to the generic "This is what you need for an 8th grader" lists we have. These are increasingly rare.

2) The Hyper-Specific - "The student must have 3 1/2" round-ring 3-ring binders binders in red, yellow and blue with inserts" Problem: I've worked in office supplies for 10 years. We have never sold red blue and yellow 1/2 binders. 1/2" binders are business tools, they come in black and white. (the easy fix: A white one with colored paper inserts.). The reason for the insanity? The teachers are so obsessed with putting the student into a single organizational method that they color code and specify brands on everything. My favorite was one list this year that demanded 3 subject Mead plastic-front, plastic ringed notebooks. I've never seen them except on Amazon. I know this woulda killed me, I never liked that level of organization. Another one they love throwing: Demanding only Ticonderoga pre-sharpened pencils (that cost 6.50 a box of 20, compared to my store's 10 back unsharpened pencils, for a dollar.)

3) The Supply Shop - these lists have a few things like notebooks and pencils, but honestly? Most of it is for the classroom. One local one this year requests 6 boxes of tissues per student. Personally, I can only assume the teacher stuffs her bra and is sweaty. Another demanded a large package of paper towels - the big ones you see people wheel out of Costco. My favorite was one that also wanted parents to provide rolls of colored paper for bulletin boards.


4) The Mystery List - for reasons known only to the school district and the Teachers' Cabal, the list of sixth-grade supplies for my daughter just entering middle school is not being made available until the week before school starts - by which time all the supplies will be sold out. Because nothing prepares a child for a step up in the world like being pointlessly jerked around by unaccountable authority figures.
 
2014-08-04 06:21:31 AM  

Gulper Eel: for reasons known only to the school district and the Teachers' Cabal, the list of sixth-grade supplies for my daughter just entering middle school is not being made available until the week before school starts


Simple question: Who needs a list?

Staples:
Pens
Pencils
Notebooks
Folders
Bookbag
Lunch Money

Should Have Anyway:
Paper Knife
Scissors
Compass
Calculator
Colored Pencils
Ruler
Protractor
Triangle

Specialized:
Musical Instrument
Graphing Calculator
Tool Box
Sports Gear
Dance Outfits
Phased Plasma Rifle in the 40 Watt Range
Block of Kitchen Knives
Etc.
 
2014-08-04 07:17:05 AM  

optikeye: Tax free weekend here was Aug 1-3 same as in FLA apparently.
It wasn't the entire week.


Aren't clothes tax-free already?

They are in NJ. Are you telling me my state missed an opportunity to tax me?
 
2014-08-04 07:21:27 AM  

doglover: Gulper Eel: for reasons known only to the school district and the Teachers' Cabal, the list of sixth-grade supplies for my daughter just entering middle school is not being made available until the week before school starts

Simple question: Who needs a list?

Staples:
Pens
Pencils
Notebooks
Folders
Bookbag
Lunch Money

Should Have Anyway:
Paper Knife
Scissors
Compass
Calculator
Colored Pencils
Ruler
Protractor
Triangle

Specialized:
Musical Instrument
Graphing Calculator
Tool Box
Sports Gear
Dance Outfits
Phased Plasma Rifle in the 40 Watt Range
Block of Kitchen Knives
Etc.


Paper knife? Please speak 'Merican around here. Your likely likely to put the entire northeast on lock down using the term knife while discussing things to being to school.

They're scissors dammit. And not regular old scissors, safety scissors.
 
2014-08-04 07:23:19 AM  
Conservatism is a mental disease.
 
2014-08-04 07:24:01 AM  
Never mind the school supply talk. Is there any indication that school uniforms actually accomplish anything related to education? The only argument I've heard is that they cut down on "distractions". Growing up in the 80s surrounded by parachute pants, Thriller jackets, and fluorescent Panama Jack shirts, I still managed to learn. The only time a piece of clothing was a distraction was when a guy in my 2nd grade class pissed his parachute pants, which funneled the pee straight onto a hot radiator. And honestly, that was just some short-term sizzling.
 
2014-08-04 07:30:59 AM  
I've heard of private schools asking for supplies, my niece goes to a small private school and I have gone out with my brother and sister in law to help buy supplies. Some of the stuff on the list seems a tad specialized like left handed pencils for blind albinos, some of it not so much. But what gets me is public schools doing it, you know their budgets are bad when theyare doing this crap or jsut blowing the money on upper level pay. I've heard of some public schools sticking to a strict dress code that almost seem like uniforms, but they dont make kids buy specific things from certain stores, as long as they have navy blue pants they are fine. What really sucks is pulling this stuff in poor neighborhoods, seems like trying to get blood from a stone
 
2014-08-04 07:32:46 AM  

vicioushobbit: jst3p: CSB:

When I was in sixth grade my family moved from the Tampa Bay area to Silicon Valley.

I am not an idiot by any means, but I was almost a year behind in math based on florida vs. California standards. I had to do a shiat ton of extra work to not be held back. The last thing florida needs to be worrying about is uniforms.

I had the opposite.  Moved from Chicago to central Louisiana after third grade.  It was about a year before I hit any math I didn't see, and I felt leagues ahead of the other kids in the other subjects.

But that could have just been because I read a book every now and then.  Reading wasn't stigmatized in my first school, but certainly was in LA.


Same here...was in "honors" program in Maryland and moved to Louisiana. I was two years ahead of my classmates on pretty much everything.
 
2014-08-04 07:56:03 AM  

big pig peaches: Please speak 'Merican around here


Y'inz cahn't even spick no 'Merican n'at tah me, y'inz jag off. Don't fergeht yer gum bands n'at, neither.
 
2014-08-04 07:59:55 AM  

delsydsoftware: Is there any indication that school uniforms actually accomplish anything related to education?


They're actually quite awesome from a societal standpoint. It saves a million hours of bickering with kids and their parents over what they can and can't wear each year, too.

On the other hand, there's no real reason to have them either, except for sports teams.
 
2014-08-04 08:18:26 AM  

im14u2c: and clean up way too many hairballs.


I'd use cheap ass paper towels for that.  Cheaper and more effective.
 
2014-08-04 08:21:54 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: ReverendJasen: Making the shiats wear uniforms won't make them any smarter or improve their standardized test scores.
How about the school worry about something productive?

It helps them concentrate more in class and removes a potential element for distraction and discipline issues.


Pros of school uniforms:
1. Everyone is wearing the same thing, reduces issues with fashion, kids wearing inappropriate clothing, some kid coming in with hate-speach printed on their cloths, etc etc.
2. Gets kids used to being comfortable in smart clothing. If some poor kid isn't comfortable wearing a suit to a job interview it'll show.
3. Makes it easy for kids and parents to work out what to wear in the morning.
4. Helps locals identify which school miscreant kids go to.

Cons of school uniforms:
1. You have to buy your kids a new uniform each year as they grow out of the old one - this can be a financial hardship for poorer folks.
2. Towards the end of the year some kids will be in ill-fitting clothes due to having grown over the last few months.
3. Your kid has one less outlet through which they can express themselves as a special and unique snowflake. Boo farking hoo.

/Grew up with school uniforms.
 
2014-08-04 08:32:40 AM  
So have the uniform rule go into affect following the winter break. Problem solved and local charities can help out with uniforms for poor kids as a christmas present.

Problem solved. Now was that so farking hard or are you going to tell me they bought xmas presents already too?
 
2014-08-04 08:33:22 AM  

doglover: Gulper Eel: for reasons known only to the school district and the Teachers' Cabal, the list of sixth-grade supplies for my daughter just entering middle school is not being made available until the week before school starts

Simple question: Who needs a list?

Staples:
Pens
Pencils
Notebooks
Folders
Bookbag
Lunch Money

Should Have Anyway:
Paper Knife
Scissors
Compass
Calculator
Colored Pencils
Ruler
Protractor
Triangle

Specialized:
Musical Instrument
Graphing Calculator
Tool Box
Sports Gear
Dance Outfits
Phased Plasma Rifle in the 40 Watt Range
Block of Kitchen Knives
Etc.


You forgot something.

Sonic screwdriver.
 
2014-08-04 08:36:13 AM  

doglover: delsydsoftware: Is there any indication that school uniforms actually accomplish anything related to education?

They're actually quite awesome from a societal standpoint. It saves a million hours of bickering with kids and their parents over what they can and can't wear each year, too.

On the other hand, there's no real reason to have them either, except for sports teams.


Uniforms don't really fix the problem of what can and cannot be work to school. Specifically, you still get the idiots who can't understand that "two inches above the knee" (for skirt length) means just that.
 
2014-08-04 08:39:40 AM  

fusillade762: So far this time the criticism has centered on cost and the short notice.

THIS IS AN OUTR-zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


I'll be outraged if the school gets a kickback from the one clothes supplier that is accepted by the dress code.

/homeschool your kid and be free of school administrators
 
2014-08-04 08:40:16 AM  

maram500: Uniforms don't really fix the problem of what can and cannot be work to school.


I'd like you to stop and think about this comment for a moment. Not long, but long enough to consider what "uniform" means and how it may be at odds with the rest of your comment.

maram500: Specifically, you still get the idiots who can't understand that "two inches above the knee" (for skirt length) means just that.


For today's assignment, we're going to compare and contrast the words "what" and "how" as in "what you wear vs how you wear it".
 
2014-08-04 08:54:50 AM  
I always found it entertaining to scan the school supply list. Every year I have the same question. If every child who attends this school brings in exactly what the school demanding, where is the school storing the supplies?  They have an offsite warehouse?  I also inquired as to why they needed supplies that I never saw being used by my kids or their teacher. (I was in the classroom a lot volunteering my time). I was told by more than one teacher that they didn't know where the supplies went, they were required to turn the majority of it in to the admin. Note: don't send the supply list items in immediately. Wait a few months, send email to teacher and ask what supplies are running short. They will be more than happy to have someone send in tissues or hand cleaner when they start running low...like say in November.
 
2014-08-04 09:07:21 AM  

maram500: Specifically, you still get the idiots who can't understand that "two inches above the knee" (for skirt length) means just that.


Idiots?

Those girls try very hard to dress like they dress.

In Tokyo, it always makes me wonder that some girls will tuck their school skirt up in public to be fashionable, then do this weird hand on the butt move when walking up up stairs in the train station to prevent people from seeing their underwear.They could just untuck their damn skirt and let in hang down to the normal length and it'd be modest enough for a nun, but nope, they need that extra 10cm of leg showing after school some arcane social reason.

Then, after years of trying to expose more skin, they grow up and slowly become like Darth Vader with full skin coverage to avoid UV.

From this
image.rakuten.co.jp
to
www.gojapango.com
to
wawaza.com
and finally
www.wordpress.tokyotimes.org
 
2014-08-04 09:17:27 AM  
big pig peaches:

Aren't clothes tax-free already?

They are in NJ. Are you telling me my state missed an opportunity to tax me?


My state is one of the few that has sales taxes on grocery food (at up to 10% in some parts).  And on clothes. And, no, no 'holidays'.  When your cohort states are Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Kansas, you're probably in a bad cohort.  Property taxes are nothing like NJ, at least.

As for the school clothes, I'd say that about 95% of my clothes as a child were from garage sales and the church basement sale.  Do uniforms make it easier or harder to clothe your kid the way my broke-ass folks did?
 
2014-08-04 09:20:10 AM  
My 2nd graders A rated elementary school just implemented uniforms starting this school year.  We know about it (and personally voted against it) in April, passed the board in early june.  we know about and what they needed to be by end of june.

Now, main reason me and the wife voted against was my son is hard to fit.  he has short legs, and is all torso.

btw, he is on the free lunch program at his school, and yet we managed to get him some uniforms...

the "uniforms" they are required to wear consist of a polo shirt (no logo allowed other than school logo if desired), in one of 3 colors (white, light blue, and royal blue), and shorts/slacks in royal blue/navy blue.
 
2014-08-04 09:23:49 AM  

doglover: In Tokyo, it always makes me wonder that some girls will tuck their school skirt up in public to be fashionable, then do this weird hand on the butt move when walking up up stairs in the train station to prevent people from seeing their underwear.They could just untuck their damn skirt and let in hang down to the normal length and it'd be modest enough for a nun, but nope, they need that extra 10cm of leg showing after school some arcane social reason.


You're sort of new to the whole "mate attraction and selection" instinct, aren't you?
 
2014-08-04 09:24:39 AM  

Lawnchair: As for the school clothes, I'd say that about 95% of my clothes as a child were from garage sales and the church basement sale.  Do uniforms make it easier or harder to clothe your kid the way my broke-ass folks did?


School uniforms were, IME, typically fairly cheap. They're not exactly made to the highest quality standards as kids normally outgrow them in a year.

That said - I remember Scout fundraising sales always seemed to have massive buckets of school uniforms available for a few pennies each, again, because kids grow out of them each year - they're either going in the trash or getting sent to the Scouts/Church for sale.
 
2014-08-04 09:49:34 AM  
So many schools require uniforms for students but staff have free will. The female staff at my school have spaghetti string straps, short but appropriate skirts, many men wear shorts.
Start at the top and make every staff member including administrators wear the same uniform students have to.

Students uniform is polo or other short sleeved non t-shirt with school patch sewn in. They can also purchase a shirt from the school store. Blue or black pants or clean jeans
 
2014-08-04 09:50:53 AM  
I'm totally against school uniforms. We have to wear business clothes when we're adults. School is the only time when we were allowed to express ourselves in any way, and discover who we are through that expression. YES, that is important to an adolescent.

Anyone who says it cuts down on bullying is dreaming. The preppies still cling together like the airy lint they are. The stoners still find each other. The nerds still look nerdy. The alternative types still band together. And all cliques still fire shots at each other and find reasons to have their tribal battles. It's human nature.

I'm grateful that I was able to spend my time in school being myself, instead of being put into a little box designed by the administration. Sticking me in a uniform would only have been a distraction as I found ways to get around the uniform code.

We aren't paying kids to be in school. They aren't soldiers or office workers; They're students who should be encouraged to be individuals, and they should be allowed to express their personality any non-destructive, non-abusive way they choose.

Want to cut down on bullying? Punish the bullies. Treat them like the little felons they are. Don't punish the good kids, the smart kids, the artistic kids, and all the non-bullies.

Better yet, if you want to cut down on bullying, you could simply remove the athletic programs from public schools and send all the dumb jock kids to special athletic schools where they can bully each other to their heart's content. That would cut down on about 3/4 of the bullying, right there... Unless we're now including insults and teasing as "bullying", in which case you CAN'T get rid of it. There will always be assholes in this world. Kids need to learn that when they're in school, because they're going to run into those same assholes in the workplace and every place else. They might as well get a chance to thicken their skin in an environment where they aren't risking their paycheck to figure out how to either cope with it, or fight back. ... Whichever is best for them.
 
2014-08-04 10:00:17 AM  

Monkeyhouse Zendo: You're sort of new to the whole "mate attraction and selection" instinct, aren't you?


So you're into middle school and high school kids? Tell us more about that Monkeyhouse Zendo.
 
2014-08-04 10:04:31 AM  
Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals

Jesus Christ.  So who sells these uniforms?  Walmart?  That would totally make sense.
 
2014-08-04 10:15:48 AM  
thumbs1.ebaystatic.com

i.ebayimg.com

media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com

thumbs3.ebaystatic.com

cdn.iofferphoto.com
 
2014-08-04 10:20:08 AM  

trappedspirit: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals

Jesus Christ.  So who sells these uniforms?  Walmart?  That would totally make sense.


I've seen school uniforms at Walmart, but the dress code they're talking about is more collared shirt and khakis than actual uniform. More like business casual except within certain colors.
 
2014-08-04 10:20:21 AM  

saintstryfe: SouthParkCon: As to the uniforms...let's see how many of these kids are coming to school in $100 Nike's or $20-30 shirts and jeans because it's what they "have" to wear. My kids go to a charter school that requires uniforms and it's a whole lot cheaper going back to school shopping. Having fashion as a distraction isn't an issue at the school my kids go to and I'm all for it and IMHO it does make a difference.

It's the way of the world, mate. You're judged on clothes. Look like a slob people will respond to that. Hiding kids behind the facade of a jumper or a button up shirt doesn't stop that.


Which is an argument for uniforms, not against. By having students all dress alike, you remove the stigma of poverty from the school environment so that kids focus on learning. It's not like this hasn't been proved time and again to be the case.

It's not an 8 year old's fault that his parents can't or won't pay to keep him dressed in what's currently fashionable. It's wrong to set that 8 year old up to be judged by that standard.
 
2014-08-04 10:24:29 AM  

no_tan_lines: I always found it entertaining to scan the school supply list. Every year I have the same question. If every child who attends this school brings in exactly what the school demanding, where is the school storing the supplies?  They have an offsite warehouse?  I also inquired as to why they needed supplies that I never saw being used by my kids or their teacher. (I was in the classroom a lot volunteering my time). I was told by more than one teacher that they didn't know where the supplies went, they were required to turn the majority of it in to the admin. Note: don't send the supply list items in immediately. Wait a few months, send email to teacher and ask what supplies are running short. They will be more than happy to have someone send in tissues or hand cleaner when they start running low...like say in November.


Maybe its like that KITH sketch where they have a job opening for workers but the yneed steel toe boots. So a bunch of guys go out buy steel toe boots show up to the site, they get taken out to the middle of nowhere and have their boots stolen that end up back in the shop to sell to the next group of workers.
 
2014-08-04 10:28:51 AM  

groppet: no_tan_lines: I always found it entertaining to scan the school supply list. Every year I have the same question. If every child who attends this school brings in exactly what the school demanding, where is the school storing the supplies?  They have an offsite warehouse?  I also inquired as to why they needed supplies that I never saw being used by my kids or their teacher. (I was in the classroom a lot volunteering my time). I was told by more than one teacher that they didn't know where the supplies went, they were required to turn the majority of it in to the admin. Note: don't send the supply list items in immediately. Wait a few months, send email to teacher and ask what supplies are running short. They will be more than happy to have someone send in tissues or hand cleaner when they start running low...like say in November.

Maybe its like that KITH sketch where they have a job opening for workers but the yneed steel toe boots. So a bunch of guys go out buy steel toe boots show up to the site, they get taken out to the middle of nowhere and have their boots stolen that end up back in the shop to sell to the next group of workers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKWvk4eoMH4

oppps forgot to add the link
 
2014-08-04 10:29:52 AM  

saintstryfe: 2) The Hyper-Specific - "The student must have 3 1/2" round-ring 3-ring binders binders in red, yellow and blue with inserts" Problem: I've worked in office supplies for 10 years. We have never sold red blue and yellow 1/2 binders. 1/2" binders are business tools, they come in black and white. (the easy fix: A white one with colored paper inserts.). The reason for the insanity? The teachers are so obsessed with putting the student into a single organizational method that they color code and specify brands on everything. My favorite was one list this year that demanded 3 subject Mead plastic-front, plastic ringed notebooks. I've never seen them except on Amazon. I know this woulda killed me, I never liked that level of organization. Another one they love throwing: Demanding only Ticonderoga pre-sharpened pencils (that cost 6.50 a box of 20, compared to my store's 10 back unsharpened pencils, for a dollar.)



That is our daughter's list this year.  The color and material make-up (e.g., cardboard versus plastic cover in the case of pocketed folders) of every item is specified, and in many cases the brand of the item is specified (e.g., Fiskar scissors).
 
2014-08-04 10:30:42 AM  
To the people complaining about supply lists for school...you know you don't HAVE to buy that stuff, right?  Like, your kid will not get kicked out of class for not having exactly what is on that list.  If you don't want to buy tissues for the class, don't buy tissues for the class.  We buy what we know our kids will definitely need, and then wait on the ridiculous stuff, or the stuff that is obviously not for our kid to use, to see if it's absolutely necessary.  If not, we don't buy it.  Most teachers have started adding sh*t for themselves on those lists, as it's hard for them to get them from the school if it isn't deemed a necessary expense, and they don't want to spend their own money on it.
 
2014-08-04 10:30:43 AM  

ReverendJasen: Making the shiats wear uniforms won't make them any smarter or improve their standardized test scores.
How about the school worry about something productive?


Trendy, designer-label clothes (or more precisely the lack thereof) was often a source of bullying and social anxiety back when I was in grade school, and I can't imagine the problem has gotten any better since then.
 
2014-08-04 10:31:39 AM  
I'm not a parent, but if I had kids in school I'd welcome the uniforms. Don't have to tell surely preteen that, no, you can't wear juicy across the ass sweatpants to school, etc.
 
2014-08-04 10:38:05 AM  

robohobo: Ha. My local district, here in the wealthiest few townships in Johnson County, KS faced having to lay off it's entire arts dept. The locals were all
"lol, no, we'll just pay for that shiat ourselves, it costs nothing". The state said no. Other towns, on both sides of the state line chimed in saying it was unfair that we could do so. We took it to court. The state lost. Hard. Now the arts dept. is funded, salaries and supplies for years. Good times


Our daughter's school in Los Angeles had a very active PGA (equivalent to a PTA).  They actively solicited $1000 donations* per child per school year to cover the salaries of the science, PE, music, and arts instructors (who would otherwise have been let go in the latest round of budget cuts) plus covered the salaries of classroom aides in the kindergarten and first grade classrooms.

People gave (we did, too).  There was something like 694 students in the school; they PGA raised over $700,000.

Unfortunately, the Dekalk County school district won't let the PTAs here do that.  It's apparently "unfair."

*still heck of a lot cheaper than private school tuition
 
2014-08-04 10:39:50 AM  

FizixJunkee: jst3p: That kid you are buying supplies for, he or his classmate will one day be deciding whether or not you can still carry on a life worth living if you have XXX surgery. Let's provide funds for his education.


I'm happy to pay property taxes (at about $500/month, far cheaper than coastal Califoria, New Jersey, etc., but nothing to snicker at) to support quality public education, but clearly what we're paying in taxes isn't enough to support schools if parents have to buy supplies that the school district should have to pay for.

Heck, it would be better if we just wrote a check at the beginning of the school year and had the school buy supplies directly: it would be more efficient, and the school could get a wholesale discount, which would make supplies cheaper, too.  The system, as is, is broken.


I don't know....seems you can't get much more efficient than having the parents pay for the miscellaneous items needed to educate their own children.  It's not like they need to get quotes and put in a PO request that gets routed for approval before hitting a purchasing department for generation of a PO which then gets faxed to a supplier giving a promise to pay based on net 30 terms.  They just buy some pens and some Kleenex to cover their kid's fair share.  The more crotch-fruit, the more they pay.  Seems more equitable than the property tax method alone.
 
2014-08-04 10:41:27 AM  

saintstryfe: 2) The Hyper-Specific - "The student must have 3 1/2" round-ring 3-ring binders binders in red, yellow and blue with inserts" Problem: I've worked in office supplies for 10 years. We have never sold red blue and yellow 1/2 binders. 1/2" binders are business tools, they come in black and white. (the easy fix: A white one with colored paper inserts.). The reason for the insanity? The teachers are so obsessed with putting the student into a single organizational method that they color code and specify brands on everything. My favorite was one list this year that demanded 3 subject Mead plastic-front, plastic ringed notebooks. I've never seen them except on Amazon. I know this woulda killed me, I never liked that level of organization. Another one they love throwing: Demanding only Ticonderoga pre-sharpened pencils (that cost 6.50 a box of 20, compared to my store's 10 back unsharpened pencils, for a dollar.)


If they have that much of a hard on for organization the teacher needs to buy it in bulk then split it into kits and charge a reasonable (i.e. no more than $25) price and expect to eat the cost for at least 5 kids in the classroom.
 
2014-08-04 10:42:17 AM  

im14u2c: What's with all the hand sanitizer these days, anyway?  We never had that crap growing up.  Are they drinking it?


Our list included the brand AND quantity (in fluid ounces) of hand sanitizer to be purchased.  We bought the stuff even though our daughter has a note on file that says she's not supposed to use it and is instead supposed to use a special handwash (she has eczema, exacerbated by the handwashing the kids have to do every three and a half minutes).
 
2014-08-04 10:42:31 AM  

doglover: delsydsoftware: Is there any indication that school uniforms actually accomplish anything related to education?

They're actually quite awesome from a societal standpoint. It saves a million hours of bickering with kids and their parents over what they can and can't wear each year, too.

On the other hand, there's no real reason to have them either, except for sports teams.


I've seen schools institute uniforms in a non-uniform fashion, which leads to a lot of parent meetings, a lot of announcements, and a lot of wasted time as parents bicker with the school about what their kids can and can't wear and why OTHER kids are allowed to wear it.

The only thing school uniforms did in central Louisiana was more clearly show which kids' families have connections/any mount of money, and which kids did not.
 
2014-08-04 10:46:50 AM  

12349876: im14u2c: and clean up way too many hairballs.

I'd use cheap ass paper towels for that.  Cheaper and more effective.



Baby wipes are even better for cleaning up hairballs.
 
2014-08-04 10:49:34 AM  

FizixJunkee: 12349876: im14u2c: and clean up way too many hairballs.

I'd use cheap ass paper towels for that.  Cheaper and more effective.


Baby wipes are even better for cleaning up hairballs.


My dog cleans up things from my four cats if I'm not fast enough.

Cheap, but nasty...
 
2014-08-04 10:49:41 AM  

SouthParkCon: FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


As to the uniforms...let's see how many of these kids are coming to school in $100 Nike's or $20-30 shirts and jeans because it's what they "have" to wear. My kids go to a charter school that requires uniforms and it's a whole lot cheaper going back to school shopping. Having fashion as a distraction isn't an issue at the school my kids go to and I'm all for it and IMHO it does make a difference.


Nike Lil' Posite One gym shoes for 3.5 - 7 year olds cost $180 (which are $20 short of a set of Nike golf clubs for kids). The LeBron XI Max Low are cheaper at $135. That's insane for someone who is going to grow out of them within a year.

But yeah, in general, school uniforms wind up being cheaper in the long run if you are buying new clothes. Probably not so much if you are buying from Goodwill or resale, unless the uniform standards are such that you can buy that at Goodwill, too.
 
2014-08-04 10:54:41 AM  

snowshovel: Nike Lil' Posite One gym shoes for 3.5 - 7 year olds cost $180 (which are $20 short of a set of Nike golf clubs for kids). The LeBron XI Max Low are cheaper at $135. That's insane for someone who is going to grow out of them within a year.


What the fark?! That's wrong on so many levels. Holy shiat. Wow.
 
2014-08-04 10:57:09 AM  

im14u2c: What's with all the hand sanitizer these days, anyway?


I did a 6wk pediatric rotation in school. The first two weeks were in the nursery/NICU, and they were fine. The last four weeks were in the child hospital area and I was sick almost the entire time with various forms of runny nose/cold. I was blessed with an outbreak of hand-foot-mouth disease during my stay.

Asked the pediatrician if she was constantly sick during residency and her response was basically "Yeah, lol".
 
2014-08-04 10:57:46 AM  
You know who else liked school uniforms?

upload.wikimedia.org

Sounds like a farking nightmare. Why would you subject children to that?
 
2014-08-04 11:02:07 AM  

Mugato: You know who else liked school uniforms?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x325]

Sounds like a farking nightmare. Why would you subject children to that?


Yeah, it's not like public schools in the US make kids salute flags and blindly repeat oaths on a regular basis....
 
2014-08-04 11:06:31 AM  

vicioushobbit: doglover: delsydsoftware: Is there any indication that school uniforms actually accomplish anything related to education?

They're actually quite awesome from a societal standpoint. It saves a million hours of bickering with kids and their parents over what they can and can't wear each year, too.

On the other hand, there's no real reason to have them either, except for sports teams.

I've seen schools institute uniforms in a non-uniform fashion, which leads to a lot of parent meetings, a lot of announcements, and a lot of wasted time as parents bicker with the school about what their kids can and can't wear and why OTHER kids are allowed to wear it.

The only thing school uniforms did in central Louisiana was more clearly show which kids' families have connections/any mount of money, and which kids did not.


To be honest, I've heard of no difference between uniforms and no uniforms in student performance. That's not what it's about.

Uniforms are for the community to know and protect students, students to get used to suits and dress codes, and pervs to buy used at ロープin Shibuya.

Wait, that last part is supposed to be a secret. Also I think ロープ closed years ago. I only went there to see if I could get a picture of the used panty vending machine in 2004. It was on a list of crazy places to visit in Tokyo. Me and another anime geek went there as a lark.
 
2014-08-04 11:10:16 AM  

WilderKWight: They're students who should be encouraged to be individuals, and they should be allowed to express their personality any non-destructive, non-abusive way they choose.


They can express their individuality by writing an essay and publishing it in the school newspaper, making video documentary and posting it on youtube, composing music and poetry, joining a band, painting, etc. They don't need to express their individually by all rushing to the same 3 tween oriented clothing stores and spending $500 of their parent's money so they can all look exactly alike.
 
2014-08-04 11:24:11 AM  

vicioushobbit: Cheap, but nasty...


You know who else was ch....aw hell, this is too easy
 
2014-08-04 11:25:48 AM  

FizixJunkee: 12349876: im14u2c: and clean up way too many hairballs.

I'd use cheap ass paper towels for that.  Cheaper and more effective.


Baby wipes are even better for cleaning up hairballs.


We use wetted paper towels most of the time to clean up hairballs and other cat vomit, especially after it dries.

But, if you can catch the cat in the act, or at least near the act, Kleenex work plenty well for a 'fresh one.'  And, thanks to that bulk purchase, we have Kleenex boxes spread throughout the house.

Pull the Plug on Grannie: im14u2c: What's with all the hand sanitizer these days, anyway?

I did a 6wk pediatric rotation in school. The first two weeks were in the nursery/NICU, and they were fine. The last four weeks were in the child hospital area and I was sick almost the entire time with various forms of runny nose/cold. I was blessed with an outbreak of hand-foot-mouth disease during my stay.

Asked the pediatrician if she was constantly sick during residency and her response was basically "Yeah, lol".


Well, I can see how hand sanitizer would make sense for someone in your situation.  You're in contact with (or at least the proximity of) a rotating cast of ill children.

The folks I've noticed with hand sanitizer don't fall into that category.  They're more like "ZOMG you touched that doorknob.  Show me your hands! *squirt squirt squirt*"  Ok, I exaggerate a little bit, but then again, their behavior did cause me to actually notice them with the hand sanitizer.  Whatever happened to letting your kid's immune system learn how to defend itself and the child with the occasional exposure to something bad?

Knowing when to wash your hands is important and should be taught.  Carrying around a bottle of hand sanitizer everywhere and using it reflexively just seems... OCD.
 
2014-08-04 11:31:03 AM  
Didn't read the article but just wanted to say that I was always in a private school and always had uniforms.  Never had an issue with them.

/then again I have 0 fashion sense so....
//can see how it can be a burden for the families that are living paycheck to paycheck though
 
2014-08-04 11:33:20 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.


Agreed.  It's too late for this year.

saintstryfe: 2) The Hyper-Specific - "The student must have 3 1/2" round-ring 3-ring binders binders in red, yellow and blue with inserts" Problem: I've worked in office supplies for 10 years. We have never sold red blue and yellow 1/2 binders. 1/2" binders are business tools, they come in black and white. (the easy fix: A white one with colored paper inserts.). The reason for the insanity? The teachers are so obsessed with putting the student into a single organizational method that they color code and specify brands on everything. My favorite was one list this year that demanded 3 subject Mead plastic-front, plastic ringed notebooks. I've never seen them except on Amazon. I know this woulda killed me, I never liked that level of organization. Another one they love throwing: Demanding only Ticonderoga pre-sharpened pencils (that cost 6.50 a box of 20, compared to my store's 10 back unsharpened pencils, for a dollar.)


I don't think it's just organization, but rather to avoid any student having something better than some other student.
 
2014-08-04 11:44:21 AM  

Target Builder: Yeah, it's not like public schools in the US make kids salute flags and blindly repeat oaths on a regular basis....


That's pretty farked up too. Thinking back  can't believe that we were actually made to do that.
 
2014-08-04 11:46:58 AM  

doglover: Monkeyhouse Zendo: You're sort of new to the whole "mate attraction and selection" instinct, aren't you?

So you're into middle school and high school kids? Tell us more about that Monkeyhouse Zendo.


I just happen to understand why post pubescent females would tend to show a little more leg and skin than Gramma. But hey, a day isn't complete without being accused of pedophilia by someone who goes by "doglover".
 
2014-08-04 11:56:27 AM  

ReverendJasen: FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


My kids had their usual list, plus a 'wish list' for teachers, tissue, sticky notes and the like.
My wife usually buys her own supplies, and extra for kids that don't have what they need. She'll also go out and buy books for her students to read, she teaches 6th grade English.

Schools should supply what is needed in the class, but good luck with that.
 
2014-08-04 12:05:47 PM  

FizixJunkee: robohobo: Ha. My local district, here in the wealthiest few townships in Johnson County, KS faced having to lay off it's entire arts dept. The locals were all
"lol, no, we'll just pay for that shiat ourselves, it costs nothing". The state said no. Other towns, on both sides of the state line chimed in saying it was unfair that we could do so. We took it to court. The state lost. Hard. Now the arts dept. is funded, salaries and supplies for years. Good times

Our daughter's school in Los Angeles had a very active PGA (equivalent to a PTA).  They actively solicited $1000 donations* per child per school year to cover the salaries of the science, PE, music, and arts instructors (who would otherwise have been let go in the latest round of budget cuts) plus covered the salaries of classroom aides in the kindergarten and first grade classrooms.

People gave (we did, too).  There was something like 694 students in the school; they PGA raised over $700,000.

Unfortunately, the Dekalk County school district won't let the PTAs here do that.  It's apparently "unfair."

*still heck of a lot cheaper than private school tuition


LAUSD wanted $1000, probably to cover the costs of all the stolen IPads they handed out to kids and teachers. So many were stolen that this year they decided to give all the kids laptops instead.

Cut science teachers? That was the scare tactic to get you to pay. Remember, they still have to pay off that $1 billion  school they built on a Superfund site and is uninhabitable.

Ever notice that they never cut a couple of middle managers, a few Administrative Assistants, or sports? The excuse for sports has always been "it's what keeps some kids in school". Well, the same can be said for art, drama, and music, dummkopf.

In the US we spend an average of $10,000/kid to educate every year. That's roughly $250,000/year for each classroom. Teachers sure aren't seeing that. The buildings are amortized. So where is it going? Hint: Not boxes of Ticonderogas.
 
2014-08-04 12:14:44 PM  

Monkeyhouse Zendo: I just happen to understand why post pubescent females would tend to show a little more leg and skin than Gramma.


It's not all that much different to be honest. Especially because they could just change outfits and be wearing anything in about the time it takes to type this sentence.

Thus, I don't think it has a sexual component so much as social rebellion appeal and fashion.

It's such a culture war that the true teenage fashionistas carry around suitcases with them in their spare time to change progressively during the day.
 
2014-08-04 12:19:50 PM  

Khazar-Khum: LAUSD wanted $1000, probably to cover the costs of all the stolen IPads they handed out to kids and teachers. So many were stolen that this year they decided to give all the kids laptops instead.

Cut science teachers? That was the scare tactic to get you to pay. Remember, they still have to pay off that $1 billion  school they built on a Superfund site and is uninhabitable.



LAUSD didn't ask for $1,000 per kid.  Our particular school's PGA (PTA) did.  100% of that money stayed at our particular school.  And, as far as I know, no iPads at our particular school were stolen.

And the school REALLY did nearly lose its science, art, and PE teachers.   It wasn't a scare tactic.  Fortunately, the parents in our area were relatively well-to-do and could afford the thousand bucks per kid requested to keep those "unessential" teachers.
 
2014-08-04 12:23:37 PM  

ReverendJasen: FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


But at least taxes are low!

/for the corporations
 
2014-08-04 12:34:38 PM  
A dress code is one thing, like banning offensive or revealing clothes. But uniforms for school is just dumb. It's just another step to turning them into indoctrinated little drones. A regular dress code is plenty good enough to let children maintain some individuality while enforcing some professionalism.
 
2014-08-04 12:49:24 PM  

FizixJunkee: TuteTibiImperes: If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


In California, schools provide all school supplies, including pencils and paper.  Not so in Georgia, apparently (as we found out).

Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies.  It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.


I don't buy the classroom supplies. I just send a note that explains that the district should provide those supplies.
 
2014-08-04 01:36:38 PM  
My wife was a teacher at a school that the principal, Mrs. Hunt, oversaw. She says that if anyone can turn an "F" school into an "A" school Mrs. Hunt is the one to do it.
 
2014-08-04 02:09:59 PM  

WilderKWight: I'm totally against school uniforms. We have to wear business clothes when we're adults. School is the only time when we were allowed to express ourselves in any way, and discover who we are through that expression. YES, that is important to an adolescent.


If you need to wear designer clothes to express yourself, chances are you never had a creative bone in your body and you're just lazy.

With a school uniform, we actually had to develop personalities and work to express ourselves. I remember more of my uniformed high school schoolmates that I was acquaintances with than un-uniformed university mates who I hung around with all the time simply because they had unique personalities that distinguished themselves from the rest.

They played a jazz encore when everyone at the school concert chanted "WE WANT MORE (JOEL!)" when the teachers got angry at the interruption, they created insanely amazing art pieces for their end of year projects, they told the best jokes and got into the craziest hijinks, they cheered when I stood up against the bully fresh off the boat from England trying to assert himself into the social order of the school whom eventually transferred away.

All wore uniforms and all I remember because they developed their own unique personalities. They had to because they didn't have the easy mode of letting their clothes do the talking. It may seem counter-intuitive, but the ones who rely on their clothes to 'express' themselves ironically end up looking just like everybody else and becoming as utterly forgettable as last years fashion.
 
2014-08-04 02:13:49 PM  

Mugato: You know who else liked school uniforms?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x325]

Sounds like a farking nightmare. Why would you subject children to that?


Oh go suck an egg. Someone us prefer to develop our personalities, rather than taking the easy way out of wearing this years fashions.
 
2014-08-04 02:16:22 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.

Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.


Yes, Tax Free Weekend was this past weekend 8/1-8/3

Uniforms are a sucky idea...and worse so for poor parents...who do not have the money for buying and maintaining uniforms
 
2014-08-04 02:23:28 PM  

gadian: I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.


Schools can pay for supplies by firing their excess administration

I work for a college, and guaranteed that every taxpayer funded school in the nation can immediately fire half of their administration...it is not needed
 
2014-08-04 02:27:24 PM  

OBBN: My wife was a teacher at a school that the principal, Mrs. Hunt, oversaw. She says that if anyone can turn an "F" school into an "A" school Mrs. Hunt is the one to do it.


School grades are a total joke.

Schools that go from an F to an A do so with a lot of C and H and E and A and T. Kids end up studying for one test at end of year instead of learning anything
 
2014-08-04 02:56:45 PM  
Ok can someone help me find Mead 3x5 ruled index cards? Every store just has oxford or their own brand.
Amazon has them at $4 each. I'm not paying $4 to get 100 index cards since I need 4 packs.  What is so special about Mead? I think I may just bring in Oxford at the start of school.
 
2014-08-04 03:19:33 PM  

ReverendJasen: FizixJunkee: Here in Atlanta, the mandatory school supply list includes red pens for the teacher to use for grading, Kleenex brand tissues (yes, they specified the brand), paper towels, Purell hand sanitizer, and other classroom supplies. It's one thing for us parents to have to buy notebooks and crayons; it's another thing altogether to have to buy supplies that the school system should be providing.

X1000
We just had to send in red pens for teacher, erasers and sharpies for the farking black(white)board, etc.  Give it a couple years, they'll be adding furnace filters and mop heads to the farking list.


Cool Story Bro:

A nearby town put its school budget up for a vote in early June.  They were going to give the teachers *yet another* raise, while (apparently, according to a friend and coworker who is also on the town council) the rest of the town's employees haven't seen a raise in a while.  And the roads are crumbling.  And property taxes went up.  Again.  Anyway, the town voted it down.  Twice (they tried passing the budget again just a few weeks ago, IIRC).  I've heard nothing about parents having to buy the school its supplies, but I guess that's next.  I mean, I'm all for making sure our schools are well-funded, but not to the exclusion of all else.

Like I said...cool story bro.
 
2014-08-04 03:21:13 PM  

Misconduc: Know who else liked all the kids to dress the same?

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x256]

[www.democratic-republicans.us image 420x312]


Second Cool Story Bro:

My son lives with his mum (he's visiting for the summer), and he's in a new school district...where they have a dress code.  My father made a comment about how when he was a kid in Germany, they ALSO had a dress code, because Hitler.

...

I should get back to work. :P
 
2014-08-04 03:24:24 PM  

Gulper Eel: 4) The Mystery List - for reasons known only to the school district and the Teachers' Cabal, the list of sixth-grade supplies for my daughter just entering middle school is not being made available until the week before school starts - by which time all the supplies will be sold out. Because nothing prepares a child for a step up in the world like being pointlessly jerked around by unaccountable authority figures.


Preparation for joining the military.  We trademarked the phrase, "Hurry Up And Wait."
 
2014-08-04 03:25:01 PM  
I'm just posting in this thread by myself, now.  Aren't I?

:-/
 
2014-08-04 03:43:25 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

If the school requires uniforms it should be required to provide uniforms for free or at  reduced cost for students on the free or reduced cost lunch program.


Why?
 
2014-08-04 03:51:34 PM  

ReverendJasen: Making the shiats wear uniforms won't make them any smarter or improve their standardized test scores.
How about the school worry about something productive?


When Rhonda Hunt, principal of   Heights Elementary, one of five in the district to receive an F this year, was transferred this summer from A-rated Lost Lake Elementary in, one of her first moves was to ask the School Board for a dress-code waiver to allow for uniforms "to help build a new school culture."

District officials said Hunt - who had experience with uniforms at Lost Lake Elementary - needs to do a better job of communicating the plan to parents before considering the request.


Gee, I dunno.  I think I'll go with the person that has experience at creating an atmosphere (or at least running said atmosphere) of excellence this one time instead of kneejerk reacting to something I'm not overly familiar with such as successful public school administration.   What do you think?  Should we let proven experience take a shot at repeating itself or your scientifically tested idea?
 
2014-08-04 04:10:15 PM  
If these parents would actually organize and refuse to buy or allow their kid to wear a uniform, uniforms would cease to be an issue.

The school can't send every kid home for not wearing one, they'd lose all their funding for that day.  If even 50% of the class showed up without one, the rule would be gone in a heartbeat.

And it should be gone.  Kids need to learn to think for themselves, uniforms are not ever even remotely conducive to that.
 
2014-08-04 04:17:30 PM  

xanadian: I'm just posting in this thread by myself, now.  Aren't I?

:-/


It's only a problem when you start trolling yourself.
 
2014-08-04 05:06:06 PM  

FloridaFarkTag: Bathia_Mapes: feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.

Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.

Yes, Tax Free Weekend was this past weekend 8/1-8/3

Uniforms are a sucky idea...and worse so for poor parents...who do not have the money for buying and maintaining uniforms


Yeah, the same parents that can't afford $6 shirts and $20 slacks that can somehow afford branded clothes from the cool shops? Can't swing $10 for a school shirt, but $120 kicks are ok?
 
2014-08-04 05:09:22 PM  

Khazar-Khum: FloridaFarkTag: Bathia_Mapes: feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.

Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.

Yes, Tax Free Weekend was this past weekend 8/1-8/3

Uniforms are a sucky idea...and worse so for poor parents...who do not have the money for buying and maintaining uniforms

Yeah, the same parents that can't afford $6 shirts and $20 slacks that can somehow afford branded clothes from the cool shops? Can't swing $10 for a school shirt, but $120 kicks are ok?


Kids wear clothing outside of school. The friends of mine who attended Catholic school and wore uniforms couldn't get out of them fast enough when they got home.
 
2014-08-04 05:12:45 PM  

FizixJunkee: Khazar-Khum: LAUSD wanted $1000, probably to cover the costs of all the stolen IPads they handed out to kids and teachers. So many were stolen that this year they decided to give all the kids laptops instead.

Cut science teachers? That was the scare tactic to get you to pay. Remember, they still have to pay off that $1 billion  school they built on a Superfund site and is uninhabitable.


LAUSD didn't ask for $1,000 per kid.  Our particular school's PGA (PTA) did.  100% of that money stayed at our particular school.  And, as far as I know, no iPads at our particular school were stolen.

And the school REALLY did nearly lose its science, art, and PE teachers.   It wasn't a scare tactic.  Fortunately, the parents in our area were relatively well-to-do and could afford the thousand bucks per kid requested to keep those "unessential" teachers.


So what does the property tax in your area cover? Remember, over 60% of the state budget must go to schools.

And it IS a scare tactic. They didn't suggest cutting middle admins or their assistants, now, did they? Nope. Just teachers, plus things affluent families are 'supposed' to care about, like the arts and science.

If no Ipads were stolen at your school, congrats. That's the only one in LA that can say that.
 
2014-08-04 05:23:09 PM  

TheLondonLook: TheMysticS: gadian: I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.

Don't have kids, do ya?

Seriously, if you do, and you don't buy what is asked for, another parent has to pick up the slack.
Lots of parents bought very little on the lists- sometimes not enough for their own child's work.
They always count on others to pick up their slack-these types- and they don't care. I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent wouldn't do it, or told their kid no, or cancelled at the last minute. Poor babies, embarrassed and sad.

So somebody told their child no to cupcakes for their birthday, and you took it upon yourself to purchase them? How did you even know when each and every child's birthday was, and whether or not their parents let them have cupcakes? Did you have rescue cupcakes with you every time you dropped your child off in the morning so you could save the day?
Maybe the parents said no because their child is allergic to an ingredient in store bought cupcakes, or is obese and prediabetic and shouldn't have any. Maybe the parents prefer to have cake and a nice dinner at home and don't want to waste 30 minutes of their child's learning time at school passing out and eating cupcakes. Shouldn't it be the parents choice what their child can and can't eat, and not yours?


What crawled up your ass?

I'm talking about parents who tell us they are going to show up with cupcakes, and then do not.
So I run down to the store, buy a flat and come back.
These were kindergarten kids, and I was the 'room mom' responsible for calling up all the parents and co-ordinating things. Also, I helped out in the classroom with parties and such. We had a party at the end of the year for kids with summer birthdays, or vacation/ holiday time born kids.

And it was not always cake. Sometimes, it was applesauce and Graham crackers. Just depended on what the folks would like to do. That was my job. Calling around.
And if the answer was no, it was no.
Not a problem.

So, that's how I knew, dumbass. Five minutes of critical thinking could have led you to similar conclusions.


And don't talk to me about food allergy kids. First- if it's life threatening, I would be informed. I've been making peanut, soy, dairy& wheat free stuff for my friend's child for 10+years.
And he's not the only child with serious allergies I've known.

I guess you got this image of me playing 'bestest mommy evar!' bringing unhealthy foods to a bunch of little kids, praising my wonderful self for saving the day!
Sorry, that's wrong.

/ glad to note your concern for my community. very concerned.
// oh, and fark you
 
2014-08-04 05:25:05 PM  

xanadian: I'm just posting in this thread by myself, now.  Aren't I?

:-/


ME SEES YOU
 
2014-08-04 05:40:03 PM  

Khazar-Khum: Yeah, the same parents that can't afford $6 shirts and $20 slacks that can somehow afford branded clothes from the cool shops? Can't swing $10 for a school shirt, but $120 kicks are ok?


There's always hand-me-downs, garage sales, and thrift stores.
 
2014-08-04 05:53:16 PM  
I simply refuse to believe that a school district failed to communicate or communicated in a less-than-optimal manner with parents.

Because school admins are usually such a model of efficiency.
 
2014-08-04 05:54:22 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: xanadian: I'm just posting in this thread by myself, now.  Aren't I?

:-/

It's only a problem when you start trolling yourself.


....

OH SHI....
 
2014-08-04 05:58:22 PM  

TheMysticS: TheLondonLook: TheMysticS: gadian: I'm completely neutral to the idea of school uniforms, wear them or don't, but don't make parents provide them without at least a semester's notice.  As for lists of school supplies, I refuse to buy any that aren't specific to my kid.  The teacher can buy his/her own red pens, markers, and kleenex. The teacher might as well be leaving a tip jar on the desk.

 Yeah, I know, underpaid teacher with no support, but it is an occupational cost at this point.  I'll volunteer time, but the teacher can take his/her supply issue up to the district and the district can bring it up to the parents and voters.  I've suggested several specific administrative positions be eliminated for cost savings, but no one listens to me, sorry teach.

Don't have kids, do ya?

Seriously, if you do, and you don't buy what is asked for, another parent has to pick up the slack.
Lots of parents bought very little on the lists- sometimes not enough for their own child's work.
They always count on others to pick up their slack-these types- and they don't care. I've had to buy cupcakes for a class of 20+ kids more than once (elementary kids) celebrating birthdays because the parent wouldn't do it, or told their kid no, or cancelled at the last minute. Poor babies, embarrassed and sad.

So somebody told their child no to cupcakes for their birthday, and you took it upon yourself to purchase them? How did you even know when each and every child's birthday was, and whether or not their parents let them have cupcakes? Did you have rescue cupcakes with you every time you dropped your child off in the morning so you could save the day?
Maybe the parents said no because their child is allergic to an ingredient in store bought cupcakes, or is obese and prediabetic and shouldn't have any. Maybe the parents prefer to have cake and a nice dinner at home and don't want to waste 30 minutes of their child's learning time at school passing out and eating cupcakes. Shouldn't it be the parents choice what their child can and can't eat, and not yours?

What crawled up your ass?

I'm talking about parents who tell us they are going to show up with cupcakes, and then do not.
So I run down to the store, buy a flat and come back.
These were kindergarten kids, and I was the 'room mom' responsible for calling up all the parents and co-ordinating things. Also, I helped out in the classroom with parties and such. We had a party at the end of the year for kids with summer birthdays, or vacation/ holiday time born kids.

And it was not always cake. Sometimes, it was applesauce and Graham crackers. Just depended on what the folks would like to do. That was my job. Calling around.
And if the answer was no, it was no.
Not a problem.

So, that's how I knew, dumbass. Five minutes of critical thinking could have led you to similar conclusions.


And don't talk to me about food allergy kids. First- if it's life threatening, I would be informed. I've been making peanut, soy, dairy& wheat free stuff for my friend's child for 10+years.
And he's not the only child with serious allergies I've known.

I guess you got this image of me playing 'bestest mommy evar!' bringing unhealthy foods to a bunch of little kids, praising my wonderful self for saving the day!
Sorry, that's wrong.

/ glad to note your concern for my community. very concerned.
// oh, and fark you


Mmhmm, sure. Your insult-filled, unnecessarily defensive and classless reply shows exactly how correct I was in my assumptions of you. Pretty sure you just told on yourself. Lol.
 
2014-08-04 07:40:58 PM  

leonel: Mugato: You know who else liked school uniforms?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x325]

Sounds like a farking nightmare. Why would you subject children to that?

Oh go suck an egg. Someone us prefer to develop our personalities, rather than taking the easy way out of wearing this years fashions.


Well English is obviously your second language but that aside, making kids dress up in uniforms is farked up.
 
2014-08-04 07:50:25 PM  
School uniforms are good as it prepares them for prison uniforms.
 
2014-08-05 03:41:29 AM  

Khazar-Khum: FloridaFarkTag: Bathia_Mapes: feckingmorons: Bathia_Mapes: FTA: Some parents at the school where 87 percent of students receive free and reduced-price meals said they were caught off guard by the short notice - school starts Aug. 18 - and had already done their back-to-school shopping and couldn't afford to buy more clothes.


I think the parents have every right to be upset if the decision to require mandatory uniforms wasn't properly communicated to them on such short notice. A lot of people live paycheck to paycheck and simply cannot afford to buy additional clothing.

This week is tax free shopping week, they are lying if they said they shopped already.

Nope. Multiple sources say that Florida's Tax Free Weekend was from August 1-3, 2014.

Yes, Tax Free Weekend was this past weekend 8/1-8/3

Uniforms are a sucky idea...and worse so for poor parents...who do not have the money for buying and maintaining uniforms

Yeah, the same parents that can't afford $6 shirts and $20 slacks that can somehow afford branded clothes from the cool shops? Can't swing $10 for a school shirt, but $120 kicks are ok?


Why does every pro-uniform person always go straight to talking about 100$ shoes and designer clothes?

Oh right, welfare queens in their Cadillacs sort of thing. One is poor so they can't have anything nice. You know, latent racism. Gotcha.
 
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