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(Canadian Football League)   Canadian Football, you so crazy   (cfl.ca ) divider line
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2241 clicks; posted to Sports » on 03 Aug 2014 at 6:19 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-03 03:43:03 PM  
In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.
 
2014-08-03 03:49:15 PM  
Seems to me that the No Fun League could learn a thing or two from CFL.
 
2014-08-03 04:14:59 PM  

dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.


I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.
 
2014-08-03 06:09:14 PM  

jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.


Don't forget that CFL rules only have 3 downs. There is no 4th down.
 
2014-08-03 06:20:46 PM  
When are they putting a team in Halifax?
 
2014-08-03 06:29:11 PM  
The best part about the video was the lumberjacks.
 
2014-08-03 06:36:21 PM  

Donnchadha: jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.

Don't forget that CFL rules only have 3 downs. There is no 4th down.


When Ray Guy said "the Hall of Fame now has a complete team," I wondered, if you have 11 Hall of Famers on offense, when would you ever have a fourth down you couldn't convert and need to punt?
 
2014-08-03 06:37:29 PM  

Decillion: When are they putting a team in Halifax?


Not enough frozen mudbanks or moose hides in Nova Scotia.  Besides I heard Bon Jovi will move the Bills there or something.
 
2014-08-03 06:43:08 PM  

dkendr: I wondered, if you have 11 Hall of Famers on offense, when would you ever have a fourth down you couldn't convert and need to punt?


When Bruce Smith, Dick Butkus, Night Train Lane and Deacon Jones, et al, force a 4th and 72.
 
2014-08-03 07:04:58 PM  

dkendr: When Ray Guy said "the Hall of Fame now has a complete team," I wondered, if you have 11 Hall of Famers on offense, when would you ever have a fourth down you couldn't convert and need to punt?


If you were playing against 11 hall of fame defenders?
 
2014-08-03 07:19:07 PM  
i1182.photobucket.com

Mutant League is weird. O_o
 
2014-08-03 07:19:11 PM  

dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.


Never knew what the rouge was:
blogimages.thescore.com
 
2014-08-03 07:19:21 PM  

Anderson's Pooper: dkendr: I wondered, if you have 11 Hall of Famers on offense, when would you ever have a fourth down you couldn't convert and need to punt?

When Bruce Smith, Dick Butkus, Night Train Lane and Deacon Jones, et al, force a 4th and 72.


3 of the 4 of those would have been called for a personal foul nearly every play of the game now though

15 yard penalty first down
15 yard penalty first down
15 yard penaly first and goal

Especially Deacon, gotdamm brutal mofo that guy, one of the best!
 
2014-08-03 07:20:03 PM  
 because the player who recovered the ball was behind the punter when he kicked the ball, he is onside and eligible to field it, just like a short kickoff. a bit of excitement the NFL decided it didn't want anymore.
 
2014-08-03 07:33:47 PM  

dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.


You are selling them short. Equal competition makes it a good game. Back in the day, I saw Flutie play a couple of times. Never seen a boring game.


I lived in an US city that had a failed CFL team back in the day.

Had a "job" carrying the mats used for ads onto the field before and after the game.

We only got paid $50 a game, which wasn't much considering we were carrying several hundred pounds of mats across the field physically in 90+ heat before and after the game.

Main perk of the job was sideline pass and flirting with cheerleaders.

It's not like they are 3rd graders running into each other or dropping the ball every 5 seconds.

It's a lot faster paced game, loaded with a lot more big plays. Leave your snobbery at the door and you might enjoy it.
 
2014-08-03 07:44:54 PM  
So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.
 
2014-08-03 08:10:38 PM  

rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.


Probably didn't realize the Ottawa player was onside. He may not be a special teams guy at all, just some random safety.

BTW, I love this game. I love the speed and excitement and the bigger field and bigger balls. I like the NFL and college too - don't get me wrong. Football, in all its varieties, is my favourite.
 
2014-08-03 08:32:36 PM  
Tyron Brackenridge is a starting cornerback/linebacker, and on the field because the short yardage defense was in.  DeMarco (the guy who kicked the ball) is a backup QB and was in the game because the RedBlacks were going for it on third down.  Brackenridge probably didn't realize the player was onside when Demarco kicked the ball.   A lot of guys that come up here to Canada and get a bit confused with the rules, in the heat of the action... Especially on a play like that... even the announcers didn't get it right, and they've called the game for 20+ years each.

/Riders season ticket holder
 
2014-08-03 08:35:21 PM  
I love the CFL.  Sure, it's a minor league compared to the NFL, but the games are damn entertaining.  I was at the Stamps/Lions game a couple of nights ago and had a blast.  Warm summer night, cold beer, one point game that came down to the last possession of the game ... good stuff.
 
2014-08-03 08:40:11 PM  

rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.


You've obviously never been underneath an Ottowan.  Frankly I'm surprised they weren't running for the exits screeching bloody murder with their arms waving in the air.
 
2014-08-03 08:47:23 PM  
Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?
 
2014-08-03 09:02:56 PM  

rugman11: Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?


There was a penalty? I'm guessing "Objectionable Conduct"

The play-by-play online doesn't list one, but it also doesn't give Ottawa 6 points for the touchdown, just the 1 for the extra point.
 
2014-08-03 09:59:18 PM  

dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.


Considering the tiny percentage of American college players who ever play in the NFL, even as third string backups, the "leftovers" that go to the CFL include some pretty good players.
 
2014-08-03 10:39:12 PM  

Donnchadha: rugman11: Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?

There was a penalty? I'm guessing "Objectionable Conduct"

The play-by-play online doesn't list one, but it also doesn't give Ottawa 6 points for the touchdown, just the 1 for the extra point.


the punting team has to allow a five yard neutral zone for the receiving team to field the punt. The ref through the flag not knowing if the recovering player was onside or not. He checked the replay, saw that the player was onside and picked up the flag. Had he not been onside a "no yards" penalty would have been called and nullified the TD.
 
2014-08-03 11:10:11 PM  

dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].


Translation:  they broke football!!!

/not really, they play closer to the original rules than the NFL does today
 
2014-08-03 11:35:16 PM  
Try this one on for size.  Same game.  Because of the rouge/single you get failed field goal returns.  Sometimes they go 110+ yards.  GO RIDERS!!!!!

http://www.cfl.ca/video/index?channel=1197
 
2014-08-03 11:51:43 PM  

alltim: Donnchadha: rugman11: Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?

There was a penalty? I'm guessing "Objectionable Conduct"

The play-by-play online doesn't list one, but it also doesn't give Ottawa 6 points for the touchdown, just the 1 for the extra point.

the punting team has to allow a five yard neutral zone for the receiving team to field the punt. The ref through the flag not knowing if the recovering player was onside or not. He checked the replay, saw that the player was onside and picked up the flag. Had he not been onside a "no yards" penalty would have been called and nullified the TD.


It seems to me like it should either be a touchdown or a touchback/no yards foul - but touchdown/no yards foul is not a valid combination. If the guy is allowed to possess the ball and score, then he can't get flagged for no yards (and vice versa). Unless the foul was on a different player, in which case, the no yards should overrule the touchdown (but you would see the signal and the flag in that case).

I could also be very wrong on this, as I've not studied CFL officials mechanics
 
2014-08-04 12:04:12 AM  

Donnchadha: alltim: Donnchadha: rugman11: Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?

There was a penalty? I'm guessing "Objectionable Conduct"

The play-by-play online doesn't list one, but it also doesn't give Ottawa 6 points for the touchdown, just the 1 for the extra point.

the punting team has to allow a five yard neutral zone for the receiving team to field the punt. The ref through the flag not knowing if the recovering player was onside or not. He checked the replay, saw that the player was onside and picked up the flag. Had he not been onside a "no yards" penalty would have been called and nullified the TD.

It seems to me like it should either be a touchdown or a touchback/no yards foul - but touchdown/no yards foul is not a valid combination. If the guy is allowed to possess the ball and score, then he can't get flagged for no yards (and vice versa). Unless the foul was on a different player, in which case, the no yards should overrule the touchdown (but you would see the signal and the flag in that case).

I could also be very wrong on this, as I've not studied CFL officials mechanics


Hence why the ref picked up the flag. He found out after that the Ottawa player was onside (eligible) to pick up the ball and let the play stand
 
2014-08-04 12:24:29 AM  
He threw the flag late knowing the play would be reviewed and he would have the option of saying that, upon review, no foul occurred.
 
2014-08-04 12:43:06 AM  
 
2014-08-04 01:03:37 AM  

rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.


The Roughriders probably assumed that all players down field were offside, it just doesn't happen very often. Now, based on that assumption, they don't recover for the exact same reason an NFL team would not try to recover a bouncing ball with opposing players around, too great of a chance of bobbling it and handing over the football. Once the ball stops, walk over and drop on it to give up the single.The most correct play probably would have been to not slow down and boot it out of the back of the endzone (he had a stride or two on the closest Ottawa player before slowing down).

Donnchadha: rugman11: Also, why did the ref throw a flag after the recovery?

There was a penalty? I'm guessing "Objectionable Conduct"

The play-by-play online doesn't list one, but it also doesn't give Ottawa 6 points for the touchdown, just the 1 for the extra point.


The ref probably tossed it for a no yards penalty not realizing that the player was onside (or covering all bases because he wasn't sure). Any offside player (in front of the kicker at the time of the kick) cannot be within 5 yards of the ball before it is touched (Canada's answer to the fair catch, make the player safe during the catch but still have the return opportunity).
 
2014-08-04 01:36:42 AM  

rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.


Probably because they were American and had no idea about that backwards-assed "onside punt" rule.
 
2014-08-04 01:37:54 AM  

brap: rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.

You've obviously never been underneath an Ottowan.  Frankly I'm surprised they weren't running for the exits screeching bloody murder with their arms waving in the air.


I've been underneath an ottoman, but I had just fallen off the sofa.
 
2014-08-04 01:52:01 AM  

dkendr: rugman11: So why did the Saskatchewan player not try to recover?  Was it a matter of being willing to give up the one point (rouge) rather than risk muffing it and allowing a touchdown?  I'm assuming he didn't know the Ottawa player was onside.

Probably because they were American and had no idea about that backwards-assed "onside punt" rule.


I know, we're weird because we like having rules in place that add to the fun of the game!  You'll never hear anyone say that was an amazing touchback...
 
2014-08-04 04:02:16 AM  

dywed88: or covering all bases because he wasn't sure


That's bad officiating.
 
2014-08-04 07:37:38 AM  
What the fark did I just watch?
 
2014-08-04 08:11:02 AM  
I think the XFL had a rule that ANY player from the kicking team could recover a punt over 25 yards.

The CFL rule seems a bit more limiting (the recovering player has to not be past the kicker before it is kicked), but, either way I think it would be a pretty good NFL rule (I'd say Arenaball also pretty much has a similar rule, in that any kick off the net is a "live" ball for either team).  Would at least make punts more interesting in the NFL... you'd still have to give clearance for a fair catch, but, you wouldn't have receiving teams just let the ball bounce around for a "downage".
 
2014-08-04 10:36:41 AM  

jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.


I think it would be fun if the NFL adopted the deep end zones that the CFL uses. As a bonus, if the NFL were to keep the goal posts at the end lines, it would automatically make field goals and extra points ten yards longer (and therefore more difficult).
 
2014-08-04 12:06:03 PM  

Cybernetic: jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.

I think it would be fun if the NFL adopted the deep end zones that the CFL uses. As a bonus, if the NFL were to keep the goal posts at the end lines, it would automatically make field goals and extra points ten yards longer (and therefore more difficult).


No, if the NFL were to adopt anything it should be the end of half timing rules. No more buring off the entire last two minutes without a play.
 
2014-08-04 12:41:28 PM  

dywed88: Cybernetic: jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.

I think it would be fun if the NFL adopted the deep end zones that the CFL uses. As a bonus, if the NFL were to keep the goal posts at the end lines, it would automatically make field goals and extra points ten yards longer (and therefore more difficult).

No, if the NFL were to adopt anything it should be the end of half timing rules. No more buring off the entire last two minutes without a play.


Yeah practically speaking the NFL couldn't adopt CFL field dimensions.  None of the current stadiums could support that.  But by all means switch to a 20 second play clock and our end of half timing rules please.
 
2014-08-04 12:46:13 PM  

dywed88: Cybernetic: jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.

I think it would be fun if the NFL adopted the deep end zones that the CFL uses. As a bonus, if the NFL were to keep the goal posts at the end lines, it would automatically make field goals and extra points ten yards longer (and therefore more difficult).

No, if the NFL were to adopt anything it should be the end of half timing rules. No more buring off the entire last two minutes without a play.


It would be interesting to see what would happen with a rule that says the clock stops after every play after the 2:00 warning. Since the average play takes less than 15 seconds of clock time, that rule could force about 8 plays to occur at the end of every half. For extra excitement, you could also cut the play clock to 20 or 25 seconds after the warning.

Actually, I'd like to see the shorter play clock for the entire game.
 
2014-08-04 02:10:59 PM  

Cybernetic: dywed88: Cybernetic: jake_lex: dkendr: In case you were wondering, in American football, that's a quick kick, covered for a touchback.  White helmets get possession at their own 20.

In Canada, if you kick (punt, kickoff, or field goal, but not extra points) into the opponents' end zone, they have to field the ball.  If the ball is covered in the end zone by a player who [list of qualifying conditions], it is a touchdown for the kicking team.  If the ball is fielded by the receiving team it must be run out of the end zone.  If the returner is stopped in the end zone, or "kneels" as in American football, the kicking team (punts, kickoffs or missed field goals) is awarded 1 point (a "rouge") and the receiving team gets the ball at their own [can't remember, 25?].

Canadian football is also played by third-tier American college football washouts and/or potheads in front of people who sleep inside hollowed-out frozen mudbanks and wear moose hides.

I've always wondered what the score would be if two NFL teams played under CFL rules.  An NFL offense would probably be damn near unstoppable under those rules and on that wide-ass field, and a NFL caliber kicker could probably always wring a rouge out of any kick they make.  I can see both teams scoring well into the 70s or even 80s  It would probably be possible for some team to crack the century mark.

I think it would be fun if the NFL adopted the deep end zones that the CFL uses. As a bonus, if the NFL were to keep the goal posts at the end lines, it would automatically make field goals and extra points ten yards longer (and therefore more difficult).

No, if the NFL were to adopt anything it should be the end of half timing rules. No more buring off the entire last two minutes without a play.

It would be interesting to see what would happen with a rule that says the clock stops after every play after the 2:00 warning. Since the average play takes less than 15 seconds of clock time, that rule could force about 8 plays ...


All of this.

And CFL needs to adopt NFL's catch rules for inbounds.  No more of this 1-foot inbound crap.  You're professionals now, keep both feet in the lines.
 
2014-08-04 02:24:00 PM  

Kurohone: And CFL needs to adopt NFL's catch rules for inbounds.  No more of this 1-foot inbound crap.


No.

One foot in expands the field and makes it more interesting. Especially if there aren't any force-outs anymore, just have one foot/any single part of your body be the rule.
 
2014-08-04 03:15:25 PM  
dkendr - so why is the rouge pronounced as "rue" and not like Moulin Rouge??
 
2014-08-04 03:50:52 PM  

DupeOfURL: dkendr - so why is the rouge pronounced as "rue" and not like Moulin Rouge??


First, virtually nobody (at least in English) calls it a "rouge" is normal conversation. People just use "single". Second, whenever I have heard people call it a "rouge" they have pronounced it correctly.
 
2014-08-04 05:59:25 PM  

dywed88: First, virtually nobody (at least in English) calls it a "rouge" is normal conversation. People just use "single". Second, whenever I have heard people call it a "rouge" they have pronounced it correctly.

Yeah, they do.  Here in Alberta, in probably the least french-friendly province in the country, people use rouge all the time.  I agree that I've never heard 'roo', it's always rooj.

 
2014-08-04 07:18:19 PM  

Cybernetic: Actually, I'd like to see the shorter play clock for the entire game.


Much as I'd love to see that (and I would), it seems like there'd be a safety issue there.  Shorter play clock equals more plays, equals more collisions, equals more brain damage, equals more lawsuits.
 
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