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(NPR)   This just in: Children don't want to eat their vegetables while at school, just like they don't want to eat them at the dinner table   (npr.org) divider line 89
    More: PSA  
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2080 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Aug 2014 at 4:42 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-03 01:05:44 PM  
eat their vegetables white at school

? Freudian Slip?
 
2014-08-03 01:13:17 PM  
I couldn't believe kale was fancy expensive greens since at my school it was the stinky shiat they dumped onto your plastic tray with an ice cream scoop.
 
2014-08-03 01:17:33 PM  
FTA: "It's those kids who can afford to get their meals elsewhere that are leaving the program," says Dianne Pratt-Heavner, director of media relations for the School Nutrition Association, which represents food service directors. "There are a million fewer kids eating school lunch under these standards."


No, I'm pretty sure poor kids throw out their veggies too, then head down to the snack machine and hit other kids up for change for chips. If it was anything like my junior high and high school.
 
2014-08-03 01:42:48 PM  
So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.
 
2014-08-03 02:09:32 PM  
I always loved my veg. Still do.
 
2014-08-03 02:12:21 PM  
"...a majority of schools were selling as many lunches as they had before the standards were implemented and that the number of kids complaining about their choices had gone way down."

Well that's just awful.
 
2014-08-03 03:20:10 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?


Children also don't want to do homework or go to bed early.  What can you do?
 
2014-08-03 03:40:28 PM  

Fano: FTA: "It's those kids who can afford to get their meals elsewhere that are leaving the program," says Dianne Pratt-Heavner, director of media relations for the School Nutrition Association, which represents food service directors. "There are a million fewer kids eating school lunch under these standards."


No, I'm pretty sure poor kids throw out their veggies too, then head down to the snack machine and hit other kids up for change for chips. If it was anything like my junior high and high school.


I grew up poor (5 kids on a cop's salary). There's no such thing as a finicky eater in a poor household. Finicky eaters are created by parents who give in to spoiled kids and offer them another choice.
 
2014-08-03 03:56:33 PM  
Your sense of taste changes as you get older. Children's bitter receptors are in overdrive until they reach adulthood, and most vegetables have a bitter component to their taste.  You have to mask the taste of vegetables with something sweet or the kids won't eat it.

TuteTibiImperes: Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese


The kids are just opting out of the program altogether and bringing their own lunch.
 
2014-08-03 03:56:39 PM  

brigid_fitch: I grew up poor (5 kids on a cop's salary). There's no such thing as a finicky eater in a poor household. Finicky eaters are created by parents who give in to spoiled kids and offer them another choice.


Me too, except young professor dad in the '70s.

ginandbacon: I always loved my veg. Still do.


Yah, my eight year old asks for veg. It's not that difficult.
 
2014-08-03 04:06:30 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.


1. That's expensive, for starters. Second, institutional cooking is a whole different ball game. Third, fresh vegetables are expensive so they usually end up getting canned, which may have sodium. Current standards are ridiculously strict on things like fat and salt which really hinders how you can cook them to taste good. I have a four-year-old who loves roasted asparagus drizzled with a bit of olive oil and a dash of sea salt. If you plop boiled canned asparagus on her plate she's going to push that away.

2. This is a good point, but as the article points out, many kids are opting out and bagging it. If kids aren't eating the food, it goes to waste and that costs the school system money if they are throwing out lots of food.

3. Good idea, but good luck with that. Schools get a ton of money for those things. I moved from a school district that banned them to a school district that allowed them during high school and gained ten pounds and got two cavities. They need to remove those vending machines from schools. Or just limit them to the teacher's lounges.
 
gja
2014-08-03 04:45:46 PM  
Obvious tag gone missing?
 
2014-08-03 04:48:53 PM  
So, people who don't feed their children well have children who don't like to eat well outside of the home either.

Seems pretty self explanatory to me.

My kids not only enjoy eating their vegetables, they even enjoy growing vegetables.
 
2014-08-03 04:57:15 PM  
So we should load up their food trays with sodium laced trans-fatty snack food, let them stay up all night playing video games while chugging Monster drinks and give them free reign to run helter-skelter through the aisles of Trader Joe's with those stupid little mini grocery carts on a crowded Sunday morning screaming their fool heads off because that's what they going to do, anyway.

Good eating habits start at home.  Parents who regularly cave in to their kids are half the problem in the classroom as well as the school cafeteria.
 
2014-08-03 04:58:27 PM  
You just can't help some people.
 
2014-08-03 05:00:18 PM  

OregonVet: Yah, my eight year old asks for veg. It's not that difficult.


Our 3-year-old is nuts for leafy greens. One of those "wtf" situations that you're nevertheless grateful for.
 
2014-08-03 05:01:38 PM  

OregonVet: brigid_fitch: I grew up poor (5 kids on a cop's salary). There's no such thing as a finicky eater in a poor household. Finicky eaters are created by parents who give in to spoiled kids and offer them another choice.

Me too, except young professor dad in the '70s.

ginandbacon: I always loved my veg. Still do.

Yah, my eight year old asks for veg. It's not that difficult.


Ditto here.  Dad was a baker, Mom was a bookkeeper.  We brought our lunches, though, and didn't get gouged that 30 cents.  Sandwich, carrots/celery sticks, and fruit of some kind- banana, apple, home-canned cherries or peaches or pears.  Pretty boring, but sometimes I'd trade an apple for a Twinkie or something.
 
2014-08-03 05:06:46 PM  
How can you have your pudding if you don't eat yer kale?
 
2014-08-03 05:06:52 PM  
So make hummus. Most picky little shiat head kids will eat carrots or bell peppers if they have a decent dip. Hummus is an easy and cheap option.

Kids in Europe, for the most part, eat their school lunches. Shockingly, if you actually prepare the food in an edible way, kids will eat.
 
2014-08-03 05:08:48 PM  
If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding.
How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?"
 
2014-08-03 05:10:14 PM  

somedude210: eat their vegetables white at school

? Freudian Slip?


Not sure if that is a 'Freudian' slip, unless the vegetables were carrots or zucchini or some such.

ginandbacon: I always loved my veg. Still do.


Now THAT was so very close to a Freudian slip.
 
2014-08-03 05:10:31 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.


If you try this you better be in the middle of nowhere.  Schools that did this and had stores within walking distance saw more and more of their students leaving the school to get food..

One school in the UK had a fix for that though,  locking their students inside for lunch.  I'm sure at that point a lot of them just chose not to eat,  great for afternoon learning I'm sure.
 
2014-08-03 05:13:42 PM  

Lsherm: The kids are just opting out of the program altogether and bringing their own lunch.


Why is this a problem? The school presented an option. If parents think they can do better, they're free to do so.
 
2014-08-03 05:14:16 PM  
[youdontsay.jpeg]


/Thanks, Obama
 
2014-08-03 05:20:47 PM  

OregonVet: brigid_fitch: I grew up poor (5 kids on a cop's salary). There's no such thing as a finicky eater in a poor household. Finicky eaters are created by parents who give in to spoiled kids and offer them another choice.

Me too, except young professor dad in the '70s.

ginandbacon: I always loved my veg. Still do.

Yah, my eight year old asks for veg. It's not that difficult.


I was a popular dinner guest at my friends houses.  They would sneak all their veggies on to my plate.  I loved 'em.
 
2014-08-03 05:26:00 PM  

Boo_Guy: TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.

If you try this you better be in the middle of nowhere.  Schools that did this and had stores within walking distance saw more and more of their students leaving the school to get food..

One school in the UK had a fix for that though,  locking their students inside for lunch.  I'm sure at that point a lot of them just chose not to eat,  great for afternoon learning I'm sure.


I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.
 
2014-08-03 05:27:54 PM  
B-b-b-but Taco Tuesdays, Spaghetti Wednesdays,  Pizza Fridays!
 
2014-08-03 05:32:13 PM  

dsmith42: Boo_Guy: TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.

If you try this you better be in the middle of nowhere.  Schools that did this and had stores within walking distance saw more and more of their students leaving the school to get food..

One school in the UK had a fix for that though,  locking their students inside for lunch.  I'm sure at that point a lot of them just chose not to eat,  great for afternoon learning I'm sure.

I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.


In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.
 
2014-08-03 05:32:25 PM  
My kids ate veggies because it was that or go hungry as there was so much food at dinner - no we were not going to make more potatoes, rice or pasta for you.  Now they prefer the veggies to the starch, to the point my son will often order a big salad when we are out instead of something horrible and fried.  Kids will eat veggies, they just have to be good veggies and not boiled to death or a salad bar full of brown lettuce.
 
2014-08-03 05:37:36 PM  
Even when I was in grade school in the 80's and 90's we dumped our veggies in the trash (canned mixed veggies that looked repulsive).

Of course kids who aren't forced to eat veggies at home aren't going to eat nasty versions of them at school.

/I agreed to let a family friend's kid stay with me for 2 weeks.  I asked her what he eats as I don't have much experience with kids.  Apparently all he'll eat are burgers, plain spaghetti noodles, oreos, and goldfish.  And to drink he likes Dr. Pepper but it gives him a tummy ache, but don't worry because she's packing lots of Pepto Bismal for him.
/Scared
/Also, seriously?  That's what you feed him?
 
2014-08-03 05:39:33 PM  
This just in :  no matter how hard you wish it was different   Michelle is not Barbara.  not by a long shot.
 
2014-08-03 05:40:34 PM  
My daughter would rather have fruit (peaches, grapes, cherries, apples, bananas, mangoes) than any sort of candy or sweets most of the time.   And will eat most vegetables other than brussel sprouts.

I agree with most that if you eat vegetables at most meals, your kids will enjoy them too.... shocking that parents who eat mostly hamburgers and fries and fried chicken and potatoes have kids that won't eat veggies!
 
2014-08-03 05:44:39 PM  

Boo_Guy: If you try this you better be in the middle of nowhere. Schools that did this and had stores within walking distance saw more and more of their students leaving the school to get food..


There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?
 
2014-08-03 05:45:37 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.


This.

Is it so hard to predict what a 10 year old will eat when given the choice between a salad and pizza?
 
2014-08-03 05:47:36 PM  
Nabb1: TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.

1. That's expensive, for starters. Second, institutional cooking is a whole different ball game. Third, fresh vegetables are expensive so they usually end up getting canned, which may have sodium. Current standards are ridiculously strict on things like fat and salt which really hinders how you can cook them to taste good. I have a four-year-old who loves roasted asparagus drizzled with a bit of olive oil and a dash of sea salt. If you plop boiled canned asparagus on her plate she's going to push that away.


More expensive, sure, but probably the best way to get kids to eat the healthier options.  I'm with you in that canned vegetables are disgusting, and presentation matters.  My college dining hall managed to serve just as many people as a school cafeteria while serving fresh prepared nutritious options that tasted good, so saying it can't be done in an institutional setting is a cop-out.  It may require more funding, and if so, the government needs to step up and provide that funding.

2. This is a good point, but as the article points out, many kids are opting out and bagging it. If kids aren't eating the food, it goes to waste and that costs the school system money if they are throwing out lots of food.

You can't prevent kids from bringing their own lunch (well, maybe you could if you made it against school rules, but I don't see that happening) so the only option is to make the cafeteria lunches appealing enough that students want them.  Peer pressure will play a role as well - once most students are eating the cafeteria lunch most of the rest will fall into lockstep. I remember at my school it was considered 'uncool' to brown bag it.

3. Good idea, but good luck with that. Schools get a ton of money for those things. I moved from a school district that banned them to a school district that allowed them during high school and gained ten pounds and got two cavities. They need to remove those vending machines from schools. Or just limit them to the teacher's lounges.

Again, schools need to decide whether they're serving lunch to improve students' health or to make money.  Lost of income from vending machines shouldn't factor into what is essentially a student health question.
 
2014-08-03 05:52:29 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.


I have a feeling you don't have kids.
 
2014-08-03 05:59:22 PM  

dsmith42: I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.


bojon: In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.


12349876: There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?


I'm in Ontario,  every high school I knew of while I was in school let you do pretty much whatever during your lunch.

Stay, go home, sit in the halls, outside on the grass (or snow lol), the caff, a restaurant, just don't be a nuisance and they don't care, it's your hour.
 
2014-08-03 06:00:27 PM  

bigsteve3OOO: This just in :  no matter how hard you wish it was different   Michelle is not Barbara.  not by a long shot.


Where would Laura come in?
 
2014-08-03 06:01:01 PM  
TuteTibiImperes:
1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

This is an important part of the equation, like it or not. I went to my niece's school for lunch last winter. The food was terrible. The unsalted broccoli was boiled to a flavorless mush. I couldn't eat it and I like broccoli. When I went to turn my tray in, I saw the predictable result: no one had eaten the broccoli. It all went to waste.

I realize that school kitchens aren't exactly bastions of culinary excellence, but surely there's a way to make the food at least palatable while staying within the guidelines. A little Mrs. Dash, for chrissakes. Something.

As it stands now, only the hungriest kid is going to eat that stuff. If the point of the program is to get kids eating healthier and setting them up for making healthier choices down the road, we have to present them with food they'll actually eat. That doesn't mean serving only pizza and nachos. It means making healthy food decently tasty. Right now, the school lunch program has the serious chance of turning kids off to "healthy eating" for life, if they learn to equate healthy food to nasty-tasting rubbish.
 
2014-08-03 06:01:16 PM  

GORDON: TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.

I have a feeling you don't have kids.


I remember enough from what I was a kid.  I went through a period where I was picky about random things and refused to eat beef stew, spaghetti, chicken and dumplings, and other stewy or 'soft' foods.  My parents held the line that I didn't have to eat it, but I wasn't getting anything else either.  With the options being going without or just eating what was available, I chose to just buckle down and eat what they'd prepared every time, and within a couple of years I got over whatever my weird aversion was anyway.

Many kids will get picky about things here and there, and will have an initial aversion to new things.  However, when faced with the option of eating what's been provided or going hungry, most will eat what is provided.
 
2014-08-03 06:03:41 PM  

Fano: I couldn't believe kale was fancy expensive greens since at my school it was the stinky shiat they dumped onto your plastic tray with an ice cream scoop.


Exactly.  They buy the cheapest crap they can and then they're surprised when the kids won't; eat it.  I love fruit but most of the fruit offerings in school were yuck.

dletter: My daughter would rather have fruit (peaches, grapes, cherries, apples, bananas, mangoes) than any sort of candy or sweets most of the time. And will eat most vegetables other than brussel sprouts.


Related to my wife perhaps.  She considers fruit to be dessert.

TuteTibiImperes: More expensive, sure, but probably the best way to get kids to eat the healthier options. I'm with you in that canned vegetables are disgusting, and presentation matters. My college dining hall managed to serve just as many people as a school cafeteria while serving fresh prepared nutritious options that tasted good, so saying it can't be done in an institutional setting is a cop-out. It may require more funding, and if so, the government needs to step up and provide that funding.


It depends on the veggies.  I find canned corn & peas fine but not much else.
 
2014-08-03 06:09:28 PM  

Boo_Guy: dsmith42: I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.

bojon: In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.

12349876: There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?

I'm in Ontario,  every high school I knew of while I was in school let you do pretty much whatever during your lunch.

Stay, go home, sit in the halls, outside on the grass (or snow lol), the caff, a restaurant, just don't be a nuisance and they don't care, it's your hour.


An hour for lunch?  LOL!  You're lucky to get 30 minutes these days in the USA.  And I don't know how lawsuit happy Canada is, but letting kids off campus unsupervised these days is just asking for one should something bad happen.  Not just stranger danger, but getting hit by a car or just falling over.
 
2014-08-03 06:09:44 PM  
they ain't hungry, simple fact
feed that swill to kids in Best Korea and I bet they would be in heaven
 
2014-08-03 06:12:49 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: So, because kids don't want to eat their vegetables their proposed solution is to stop asking them to?

How about:

1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

2. Eliminate the non-healthy options - if the kids are picking fries and grilled cheese over kale and roasted chicken, stop offering the fries and grilled cheese

3. Take the soda/chip machines out of the schools

When the option is eating the nutritious meals or not eating, most kids will start accepting what's offered.


As someone on the inside (I'm a high school teacher), I can tell you that we've done options 2 and 3 here in California.  Here's what I've seen:

The food is disgusting.  Bland, tastes horrible.
The serving size is very small.  Why does this matter?  We have kids that do sports, PE, and classes for 7.5 hours a day.  They need enough food to actually perform.  Hungry kids don't learn well, and they certainly don't do well in PE or sports.
There is a huge black market of backpack sales going on, which can lead to discipline problems and theft.  So what you have is little Johnny takes the $2 he was supposed to spend on the school lunch, and instead buys $2 worth of candy and soda from the backpack salesman.  Nice work, gov.

Our school has tried the salad bar, we have a sub shop.  Our kitchen staff tries to emulate what is popular, but in a healthy way, and sadly, inexpensively.  It's pretty much impossible.  I know some of you will sit here and tell us about how you LOVED vegetables, but in reality that is a rarity among teens.

I may be old, but when I was in school we had soda fountains, fries, pizza, burgers, and also the healthier meals.  No one ate the healthy stuff.  We were kids.  But somehow we survived and we weren't all giant lazy fatasses.  I managed to make weight for the wrestling team even with the evil junk food in the cafeteria.  And we even had open campus...I could go eat ANYWHERE I wanted to.

This is not something you can legislate away.  One crap meal a day will not make a kid fat.  Eating crap for all three meals a day and getting no exercise will make you fat.  Playing video games all day while eating crap will make you fat.  Mom and dad too lazy to make dinner, and buy fast food 3-4 nights a week?  Venti Starbucks frap for breakfast?  Those are the things that contribute to this problem more than one meal at school a day for 5 days a week.  Think about it, there are 21 meals a week...the schools provide 5 of them.  I'm not advocating pure fried gluttony everyday, but you can make pizza and burger that taste OK and aren't 1500 calories.

/Onion, belt, lawn, etc.
 
2014-08-03 06:14:05 PM  

bibli0phile: TuteTibiImperes:
1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

This is an important part of the equation, like it or not. I went to my niece's school for lunch last winter. The food was terrible. The unsalted broccoli was boiled to a flavorless mush. I couldn't eat it and I like broccoli. When I went to turn my tray in, I saw the predictable result: no one had eaten the broccoli. It all went to waste.

I realize that school kitchens aren't exactly bastions of culinary excellence, but surely there's a way to make the food at least palatable while staying within the guidelines. A little Mrs. Dash, for chrissakes. Something.

As it stands now, only the hungriest kid is going to eat that stuff. If the point of the program is to get kids eating healthier and setting them up for making healthier choices down the road, we have to present them with food they'll actually eat. That doesn't mean serving only pizza and nachos. It means making healthy food decently tasty. Right now, the school lunch program has the serious chance of turning kids off to "healthy eating" for life, if they learn to equate healthy food to nasty-tasting rubbish.


But the junk food isn't any better.  I remember in junior high on pizza days, you would get a piece of cardboard covered in catsup and slimy cheese.  The regular routine was to grab a bunch of napkins and sop the grease off the top.
 
2014-08-03 06:17:19 PM  

bibli0phile: TuteTibiImperes:
1. Hire some actual culinary professionals to design menus and teach the cafeteria ladies how to cook vegetables and healthy choices in a tasty way (provide federal funding for this if necessary)

This is an important part of the equation, like it or not. I went to my niece's school for lunch last winter. The food was terrible. The unsalted broccoli was boiled to a flavorless mush. I couldn't eat it and I like broccoli. When I went to turn my tray in, I saw the predictable result: no one had eaten the broccoli. It all went to waste.

I realize that school kitchens aren't exactly bastions of culinary excellence, but surely there's a way to make the food at least palatable while staying within the guidelines. A little Mrs. Dash, for chrissakes. Something.

As it stands now, only the hungriest kid is going to eat that stuff. If the point of the program is to get kids eating healthier and setting them up for making healthier choices down the road, we have to present them with food they'll actually eat. That doesn't mean serving only pizza and nachos. It means making healthy food decently tasty. Right now, the school lunch program has the serious chance of turning kids off to "healthy eating" for life, if they learn to equate healthy food to nasty-tasting rubbish.


We could do much better by emulating the French system - in most suburban or rural schools they have trained chefs on site who prepare everything from scratch, and in the cities they have a central kitchen which prepares everything from scratch and sends it out to the individual schools (where some final prep and/or cooking to finish is done).

In either case the meals are pretty sophisticated, held to a high standard of quality, and served to the kids at the tables on real plates with real silverware to impress upon them proper table manners dining etiquette.

Costs aren't much more than US lunch programs, but the the actual lunches are of much higher quality:

www.culinate.com

www.nolafrancaise.com

www.cornichon.org

c2.staticflickr.com
 
2014-08-03 06:22:57 PM  

12349876: Boo_Guy: dsmith42: I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.

bojon: In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.

12349876: There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?

I'm in Ontario,  every high school I knew of while I was in school let you do pretty much whatever during your lunch.

Stay, go home, sit in the halls, outside on the grass (or snow lol), the caff, a restaurant, just don't be a nuisance and they don't care, it's your hour.

An hour for lunch?  LOL!  You're lucky to get 30 minutes these days in the USA.  And I don't know how lawsuit happy Canada is, but letting kids off campus unsupervised these days is just asking for one should something bad happen.  Not just stranger danger, but getting hit by a car or just falling over.


It used to be 90 until the farking 9'ers had a baby powder fight in one of the side hallways.  The dipshiats.

Stranger danger? Getting hit by a car?  Really?  These are 14-18 year olds,  young adults.  If they're stupid enough to get in the 'Free Candy' van or don't know how to cross a street yet then they're in pretty big trouble.  You know you can get a drivers permit at 15-16 right?

It's very simple,  you leave school grounds,  the school isn't responsible.  I'm kinda shocked that this is such a "OMG you let them do that" thing.
 
2014-08-03 06:24:24 PM  
12349876:

An hour for lunch?  LOL!  You're lucky to get 30 minutes these days in the USA.  And I don't know how lawsuit happy Canada is, but letting kids off campus unsupervised these days is just asking for one should something bad happen.  Not just stranger danger, but getting hit by a car or just falling over.

Oh forgot to add,  not very lawsuit happy,  not at all really.
 
2014-08-03 06:24:25 PM  

Boo_Guy: dsmith42: I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.

bojon: In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.

12349876: There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?

I'm in Ontario,  every high school I knew of while I was in school let you do pretty much whatever during your lunch.

Stay, go home, sit in the halls, outside on the grass (or snow lol), the caff, a restaurant, just don't be a nuisance and they don't care, it's your hour.


truth be told, there are probably less bullets flying around in that 'hood
 
2014-08-03 06:24:59 PM  

Boo_Guy: 12349876: Boo_Guy: dsmith42: I can't speak for everywhere in the US, but in Texas leaving the school campus was illegal unless you were a high school senior.

bojon: In the early 70s, I was suspended for leaving school grounds to go to Taco Bell.

12349876: There are still schools that let their kids go off campus for lunch?

I'm in Ontario,  every high school I knew of while I was in school let you do pretty much whatever during your lunch.

Stay, go home, sit in the halls, outside on the grass (or snow lol), the caff, a restaurant, just don't be a nuisance and they don't care, it's your hour.

An hour for lunch?  LOL!  You're lucky to get 30 minutes these days in the USA.  And I don't know how lawsuit happy Canada is, but letting kids off campus unsupervised these days is just asking for one should something bad happen.  Not just stranger danger, but getting hit by a car or just falling over.

It used to be 90 until the farking 9'ers had a baby powder fight in one of the side hallways.  The dipshiats.

Stranger danger? Getting hit by a car?  Really?  These are 14-18 year olds,  young adults.  If they're stupid enough to get in the 'Free Candy' van or don't know how to cross a street yet then they're in pretty big trouble.  You know you can get a drivers permit at 15-16 right?

It's very simple,  you leave school grounds,  the school isn't responsible.  I'm kinda shocked that this is such a "OMG you let them do that" thing.


I'm not saying I approve of the lawsuits, just that they would happen in the good ole USA, and even getting one thrown out in court can cost a lot of money.
 
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