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(Some Guy)   Somebody had British people fill in all of their American stereotypes on maps of the US. Come for MS: "Named by a cat walking across a keyboard", stay for RI: "Tiny; Stoned Students; Not a real place; Not in Rhodes; Not an Island"   (liberalamerica.org ) divider line
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24700 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Aug 2014 at 2:08 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-03 10:39:32 PM  

i upped my meds-up yours: Fissile: lindalouwho: Farms in Pittsburgh?
Guess they forgot about the industrial revolution. And know nothing of robotics, tech, and state of the art hospitals/research.

Google up the history of Paterson, NJ, that's were American industry began.  Paterson was founded as an industrial city, and was the first city in the new US of A to have its streets laid out on a grid pattern.

NJ was the high tech corridor well into the 50s. Most any new invention caught on there before it went anywhere.


Paterson was America's first planned industrial city.  The first Locomotive built in America was built in Paterson.  Samuel Colt, the inventor of the revolver, built his first guns in Paterson.  Thomas Edison had his lab in Menlo Park, NJ.  Roselle, NJ was the first town in the world to be wired for electric lights in 1883.  The transistor was developed at Bell Labs in New Jersey.  New Jersey was assigned the first telephone area code in the US....201.   The first direct dial long distance phone call was made from NJ to California.  The engines that powered the Enola Gay B-29 were built in New Jersey,  The PT boat skippered by JFK in the Pacific during WWII was built in New Jersey.  At one time more television sets were produced in Camden, NJ than all the rest of the world combined.  Once upon a time, NJ had 3 auto assembly plants, two Ford and one GM.  Standard Oil, now known as Exxon, was first incorporated in NJ.  The list could literally go on for hundreds of pages.  This was once a motherfarker of a state.
 
2014-08-03 11:50:07 PM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.


1.  London
2. Cardiff
3.  York
 
2014-08-03 11:57:32 PM  

grimlock1972: So very cold, Prince  fine.   Big shopping mall ok, same for the Fargo reference.    cute accent?   err what ? never heard the Minnesota accent called cute.


Oh you betcha it's adorable.
 
2014-08-04 12:34:32 AM  

Prey4reign: Pants full of macaroni!!: mjjt: [i57.tinypic.com image 850x691]

I used to know an Aussie who couldn't keep Ohio and Iowa straight.  She even lived in the States for awhile.  Married an American.

/she was also quite vehement that Australians are the only people on earth without an accent

I was once at a meeting with people from a number of countries.  A New Zealander got up and gave a long and difficult to understand speech because his Kiwi accent was so thick.  I turned to my neighbor and said, "I guess I can depend on you to interpret that."  He just said, "not really, Kiwis talk funny, you know."


Melbourne paper today has an article on "The great Australian speech impediment"

http://www.theage.com.au/comment/the-great-australian-speech-impedim en t-20140801-zzjjx.html
 
2014-08-04 01:31:38 AM  

47 is the new 42: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

1.  London
2. Cardiff
3.  York


Basically think of any US cities that have 'New' in the title and then remove it.
 
2014-08-04 03:22:28 AM  

wax_on: Eh. I'm calling shenanigans. No way do British people know that much about the U.S. and it's geography/ethnology. Occams's razor. It's much more likely that some snarky American did this and is trying to sell it as the work of the Brits.



You have no idea how pervasive American culture is around the world. I'm Danish and I have never been to the states, but I could easily have filled in a map like this. Would have put more creationism in Kansas though.
 
2014-08-04 03:54:05 AM  

DontMakeMeComeBackThere: Fano: tripleseven: Sliding Carp: About the only thing on there I'd disagree with is 'lakes' for Indiana.  Where did they get that?

I suspect that if we tried that with US people labeling the UK, if they gave us a big enough map to work with, we'd put London  in Scotland, Wales in Switzerland, call Ireland Greenland,  and every single label would be 'funny accent'.

This leads me to believe that the people who made this were not Brits. Not rank and file Brits anyway. Probably expats here for a long time, or Americans.

Fake Irish people for Boston was pretty funny though.

Almost certainly. Most foreigners would be incapable of doing such a thing for any other country. Anyway, I was glad to get away with only "light imbreeding"

Yeah, no kidding... Even people who live here don't know there are rehab centers in the southern part of Arizona.  Doubt you could find a single Brit who would say rehab centers are anywhere other than Beverly Hills.

Fake map is fake.


Pretty much all the somewhat accurate references on the map are things you'll easily pick up from pop culture and media. The sheer amount of music, movies, television, games and literature you export combined with extensive media coverage of your politics, your celebrities and your society in general means that the whole world knows more trivia about you than you know about us.
How do I know that a Cheesehead is someone from Wisconsin? No idea, but it has probably been references in at least a dozen sit-coms. The guy who said "rehab centers" in Arizona was probably thinking of Tiger Woods doing sex rehab at The Meadows.
 
2014-08-04 04:14:15 AM  

Dansker: You have no idea how pervasive American culture is around the world. I'm Danish and I have never been to the states, but I could easily have filled in a map like this. Would have put more creationism in Kansas though.


In my (admittedly limited, I've spent about 4 months in Copenhagen and Aarhus) experience the level of American pop cultural knowledge amongst youngish Danes far outweighed that amongst Brits, perhaps because the population isn't big enough to support a large local media industry?

Personally, I'd struggle to find anything at all to say about Wisconsin :-\
 
2014-08-04 04:53:46 AM  
Very surprised that Hollywood or movies wasn't mentioned for California.

I think the rest of the world knows a lot more about the U.S. than we know about them. How many Americans can name the capital of Australia?
 
2014-08-04 04:58:55 AM  

FarkinNortherner: Dansker: You have no idea how pervasive American culture is around the world. I'm Danish and I have never been to the states, but I could easily have filled in a map like this. Would have put more creationism in Kansas though.

In my (admittedly limited, I've spent about 4 months in Copenhagen and Aarhus) experience the level of American pop cultural knowledge amongst youngish Danes far outweighed that amongst Brits, perhaps because the population isn't big enough to support a large local media industry?


I think it's more to do with an oversaturation of commercial tv stations buying every cheap American show they can get their hands on. Aside from the national broadcaster Danmark Radio (who do great crime shows and dramas, some of which are sold around the world) you can flip through most Danish TV stations and aside from the subtitles, you'd swear you were in the US.

Personally, I'd struggle to find anything at all to say about Wisconsin :-\

Cheese and Scandinavians.
 
2014-08-04 04:59:06 AM  

lohphat: You'd turn it off when I was halfway across: http://www.porterandsorterpub.co.uk/

As for the Croydon proper, it's been a noted dump for years now and since the credit crunch it's only gotten worse.

I do love the idea of you taking a stroll down Church Street and telling people how Croydon has become too gentrified; but please God don't ever actually try it. The ones who understand what gentrified means will think you're taking the piss and the ones who don't will probably just hit you on general principle.

Ans to answer the original question, yes, there are chavs in Croydon.

The http://www.porterandsorterpub.co.uk behind the station went from a smash a pint glass on yer mate's head to a somewhat clean and respectable pub.

The Crown http://www.emberinns.co.uk/the-crown-shirley/ is pleasant enough too.

My experience in the area is admittedly limited not being a local but the changes I've seen in 15 years is that it's not a shiathole, the tram system is popular and well liked, and it's a commutable and affordable suburb of London.



Well, regarding the Crown, I think we've already established that we have different definitions of what counts as Croydon.

As for the Porter & Sorter, I'm sure it's a nicer pub today than it was when I used to drink there at the turn of the millennium, but that would be because the closure of the Cherry Orchard Road Sorting Office next door means it's no longer an early licence pub filled with postal workers getting drunk from 8 am onwards. It also means lots of jobs lost in the area and an abandoned industrial estate which was the subject of a Fark headline as recently as six weeks ago;

Teenager who lost half a finger during an illegal rave says he stayed and partied and didn't seek medical attention because the bass had been dropped and it was "hard"

Another kid died of a ketamine OD, while the police did nothing to break it up, just like they did nothing back in 2011 when rioters burned down one of the few remaining bits of pre-WWII Croydon town centre.

I think the signs of gentrification you see are basically the improvements to amenities around the East Croydon transport hub (hooray, Waitrose). Meanwhile the second level of the Whitgift centre is half empty, the Allders mall is mostly dead space. Croydon as a retail centre has been hit hard, light industry isn't doing too well and all that's really left are office jobs and the getting people shiatfaced drunk industry. If you grew up in the area there's not a lot of gentrification to be seen.
 
2014-08-04 06:08:19 AM  
I like how these types of threads still turns in to an America bashing forum.
Article: Brits are ignorant of American geography
Thread: Stupid farking Jesus lovers
 
2014-08-04 06:29:23 AM  

Gdalescrboz: I like how these types of threads still turns in to an America bashing forum.
Article: Brits are ignorant of American geography
Thread: Stupid farking Jesus lovers


Except for all the comments about how the map is too accurate to be real because foreigners can't possibly know that much about the US. But the important thing is that you found a way to feel victimized.
 
2014-08-04 06:43:04 AM  

Gdalescrboz: I like how these types of threads still turns in to an America bashing forum.
Article: Brits are ignorant of American geography
Thread: Stupid farking Jesus lovers


This thread has more posts about cheese, British ignorance of US history, and the possible gentrification of Croydon than about all Americans being "stupid farking Jesus lovers." Actually, it doesn't really have any of the latter.
 
2014-08-04 07:58:10 AM  
Dansker
The "Jesus" land is a given. While I go to a church, Some of the more right wing scare me. Actually, the horror stories from Wellsley Mass from the early 60's still scare me.

And as to the cheese, my favorite place that once was "cult" is now sorta mainstream. I show up and there are plates from all over. I only mention this because I showed up when a salesman retired. There was an "insult" contest.(Wisconsin for those not NFL fans) I made it to the last round when I was told "may your son be a bears fan". Most awesome insult ever.
 
2014-08-04 08:10:05 AM  

Dansker: FarkinNortherner: Dansker: You have no idea how pervasive American culture is around the world. I'm Danish and I have never been to the states, but I could easily have filled in a map like this. Would have put more creationism in Kansas though.

In my (admittedly limited, I've spent about 4 months in Copenhagen and Aarhus) experience the level of American pop cultural knowledge amongst youngish Danes far outweighed that amongst Brits, perhaps because the population isn't big enough to support a large local media industry?

I think it's more to do with an oversaturation of commercial tv stations buying every cheap American show they can get their hands on. Aside from the national broadcaster Danmark Radio (who do great crime shows and dramas, some of which are sold around the world) you can flip through most Danish TV stations and aside from the subtitles, you'd swear you were in the US.

Personally, I'd struggle to find anything at all to say about Wisconsin :-\

Cheese and Scandinavians.


Danish crime shows are phenomenally good.  I prefer to watch them with subtitles because a dubbed voice is never quite right and ruins the atmosphere.  Forbrydelsen was addictive.  The sweater got it's own fan club.
 
2014-08-04 08:32:20 AM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: iheartscotch: Tornados and the wizard of oz? At least they aren't asking if we still get ambushed by Indians. I actually had a French girl ask me about Indians while I was in Ireland. The answer is: they usually just hang out, build casinos, sell whiskey, fireworks and meth.

To be far that's what most Americans think about Kansas when they think of it. Has anything worth while came from that sad state?


Sam Brownback.
Pat Roberts.
John Brown
 
2014-08-04 08:40:29 AM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: iheartscotch: Tornados and the wizard of oz? At least they aren't asking if we still get ambushed by Indians. I actually had a French girl ask me about Indians while I was in Ireland. The answer is: they usually just hang out, build casinos, sell whiskey, fireworks and meth.

To be far that's what most Americans think about Kansas when they think of it. Has anything worth while came from that sad state?


John Brown? ( a name not popular with Southerners)
 
2014-08-04 08:45:47 AM  

Persnickety: CleanAndPure: ArcadianRefugee: "Not in Rhodes; Not an Island"

1) The state's name is "State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations"
2) "Rhode Island" is/was Aquidneck Island which, in 1637, was renamed by Roger Williams with these words: "Aquethneck shall be henceforth called the Isle of Rodes or Rhode-Island."

/stupid Brits

No. Brits are correct.

The State isn't an island.

Read it again.  There is no state called "Rhode Island."


i232.photobucket.com
 
2014-08-04 09:11:58 AM  

NutWrench: There are cookies in Maryland and I was not informed?


That kinda threw me, too, but I looked up "Maryland cookies" on Google, and lo and behold, its a
British brand of cookies.  They look like your average cheap generic type, but they're cookies and that's
good enough for me.
 
2014-08-04 09:15:32 AM  

Fissile: lohphat: I'm an Egyptian!: Accurate overall, with some exceptions. But Swedish for Connecticut? Really? How the hell do the Swedish fit in?

Victor Borge had a ranch in CT but he was a Dane.

*shrug*

They got their Murican history lessons confused.  The Colony of New Sweden(befor the English took over) was originally set up in what is now South Jersey, Delaware and Southern Pennsylvania.  There is a town in South Jersey called Swedesboro to this day.  Northern New Jersey, and Southern New York was originally the Colony of New Netherlands, NYC was originally called New Amsterdam.


sdsouthard.files.wordpress.com

"We knew that."
 
2014-08-04 09:34:54 AM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.


Cambridge
Carlisle
Mildenhall
Penrith
Glasgow
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Lakenheath
Stirling
London
Falkirk
Swinden
Bury St. Edmunds
Birmingham
Aberdeen
Kilmarnock
Cardiff
Liverpool
Hexham
John o' Groats
Newcastle upon Trent...Tyne? (looked it up after I typed; Tyne is correct)
Belfast

...I think I'm tapped out

Nope, Worlington
Nottingham

...technically many of these are likely not "cities," don't know the definition of "city" in the UK
 
2014-08-04 09:40:37 AM  
They're not cookies; they're biscuits.
 
2014-08-04 09:41:11 AM  

noneyourbase: noneyourbase: NutWrench: There are cookies in Maryland and I was not informed?

This.  Marylander most of my life.  I like cookies as the next guy, but I had no idea that they were associated with MD.

<a href="http://imgur.com/KiS7coS"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/KiS7coS.jpg" title="Hosted by imgur.com" /></a>

Welp, learned something new today.


Evidently not how to preview..

/ba
//dum
///ching
 
2014-08-04 09:43:26 AM  

deadlyplatypus: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

Cambridge
Carlisle
Mildenhall
Penrith
Glasgow
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Lakenheath
Stirling
London
Falkirk
Swinden
Bury St. Edmunds
Birmingham
Aberdeen
Kilmarnock
Cardiff
Liverpool
Hexham
John o' Groats
Newcastle upon Trent...Tyne? (looked it up after I typed; Tyne is correct)
Belfast

...I think I'm tapped out

Nope, Worlington
Nottingham

...technically many of these are likely not "cities," don't know the definition of "city" in the UK


Stoke on Trent, Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle under Lyme tend to confuse.  Worlington is a small village that I've only heard of because my sister in law lives nearby and I've driven through it.
 
2014-08-04 09:53:50 AM  

Spiralmonkey: deadlyplatypus: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

Cambridge
Carlisle
Mildenhall
Penrith
Glasgow
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Lakenheath
Stirling
London
Falkirk
Swinden
Bury St. Edmunds
Birmingham
Aberdeen
Kilmarnock
Cardiff
Liverpool
Hexham
John o' Groats
Newcastle upon Trent...Tyne? (looked it up after I typed; Tyne is correct)
Belfast

...I think I'm tapped out

Nope, Worlington
Nottingham

...technically many of these are likely not "cities," don't know the definition of "city" in the UK

Stoke on Trent, Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle under Lyme tend to confuse.  Worlington is a small village that I've only heard of because my sister in law lives nearby and I've driven through it.


Frankly, after having been there, I can't understand how Worlington is not part of Mildenhall, there's only 300 yards between them. Ooo, Cummertrees! (that's a fun one).
 
2014-08-04 10:23:21 AM  
I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!
 
2014-08-04 10:51:27 AM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Michigan is... Pretty damn accurate. At least "basically Canada" over the UP

/put your hands up for Detroit is adorable


I love this city.
 
2014-08-04 10:58:14 AM  

deadlyplatypus: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

Cambridge
Carlisle
Mildenhall
Penrith
Glasgow
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Lakenheath
Stirling
London
Falkirk
Swinden
Bury St. Edmunds
Birmingham
Aberdeen
Kilmarnock
Cardiff
Liverpool
Hexham
John o' Groats
Newcastle upon Trent...Tyne? (looked it up after I typed; Tyne is correct)
Belfast

...I think I'm tapped out

Nope, Worlington
Nottingham

...technically many of these are likely not "cities," don't know the definition of "city" in the UK


Ooh, my turn:

Harrogate
Skipton
Pateley Bridge
Leeds
Knaresborough (spelling?)
Darley
Shilbottle
Otley
Manchester
Liverpool
Newcas... dammit, already taken
Ripon
Bradford
Halifax
Wetherby
Thirsk

And my personal favorite, that we would drive by when we went to Bolton Abbey:

Blubberhouses

/why yes, they are all within about an hour's drive of each other
 
2014-08-04 11:21:18 AM  

Dimensio: As expected, Texas is known for "guns", which shows that many foreigners are wholly ignorant of Kentucky.


They also did not list for KY the Bourbon... Horses... Insane devotion to College Sports Programs... Tobacco...
 
2014-08-04 11:21:50 AM  
You had to go to Yahoo Answers to know Bristol?

/srsly?
 
2014-08-04 11:26:42 AM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.


Well, there's London... um... Sheboygan... hmm.... Deadwood.... no wait... um... How about...

Ipswich; Derby; Londonderry; Belfast;  Manchester (United and City)... Leeds... Edinburgh... Norwich... Monty & Python...
 
2014-08-04 11:29:44 AM  

mjjt: [i62.tinypic.com image 460x394]



Yep... that's it... Everything I've ever learned about Great Britain, I've learned from Monty Python!
 
2014-08-04 11:32:03 AM  

CleanAndPure: Of course there are good restaurants/pub eateries in Britain. However the vast majority are not very good.

Britain's best foods arnt from restaurants typically. It is the poor state of Britain's eat out places that give Britain the reputation of bad food because that is what foreigners experience.


The above opinion suggests you either a) haven't been to England since the 1970s / 1980s, or b) know nothing about food, or c) know nothing about England. Or some combination of the above.
 
2014-08-04 12:06:52 PM  

jbrad47128: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

Well, there's London... um... Sheboygan... hmm.... Deadwood.... no wait... um... How about...

Ipswich; Derby; Londonderry; Belfast;  Manchester (United and City)... Leeds... Edinburgh... Norwich... Monty & Python...


Bolton / Notlob
 
2014-08-04 12:13:10 PM  
If this was actually written by Brits, the accuracy is actually kind of embarrassing.
 
2014-08-04 12:47:51 PM  
I wonder what the default word-association for Chicago is in other places Europe these days. Back in 1982 when I spent a semester in Spain, the most common reaction when someone learned I was from Chicago was, "Ahhh, Al Capone! Taka-taka-taka-taka!!" (with air-tommy-gun gesture)
 
2014-08-04 01:06:03 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: [img.fark.net image 137x159]

Yup.  They nailed it.


Have to agree, especially the 'no idea, sorry'. I work with folks in the UK often and when I mention I'm from Cleveland the response if either 'ah, oh, yes Cleveland' or "didn't Cleveland once have an american football team?" Londoners also commiserate regarding the summer weather being much like their city.
 
2014-08-04 01:42:19 PM  

You'd turn it off when I was halfway across:
Well, regarding the Crown, I think we've already established that we have different definitions of what counts as Croydon.


I grew up in a sprawling suburb in Southern California where city boundaries are huge.

The difference between EC station and The Crown is walkable. The White Bear is drivable in less than 10minutes from gran's.

Funny you should mention Alders. I bought several shirts there just a few years ago and when I wanted to go back on my last trip I was told it shuttered.

I had no idea about the post facility as I always remembered mail lorries around the place.

The refurbishment of the large round office tower next to the station stands out in my memory.

I guess I don't go into town much. I usually stick to the West Wickham side of things. But to my US sensibilities they're all just hamlets of EC since they're so close.

Next time I'm there I'll ring you up for a pint at the White Bear.

Small world wot?
 
2014-08-04 02:12:06 PM  

Akbar the Trappiste Monk: London?

Yeah, London - (fish, chips, cup-o-tea ,bad food, worse weather... LONDON!



FTFY ;)
 
2014-08-04 04:27:56 PM  

lohphat: You'd turn it off when I was halfway across:
Well, regarding the Crown, I think we've already established that we have different definitions of what counts as Croydon.

I grew up in a sprawling suburb in Southern California where city boundaries are huge.

The difference between EC station and The Crown is walkable. The White Bear is drivable in less than 10minutes from gran's.

Funny you should mention Alders. I bought several shirts there just a few years ago and when I wanted to go back on my last trip I was told it shuttered.

I had no idea about the post facility as I always remembered mail lorries around the place.

The refurbishment of the large round office tower next to the station stands out in my memory.

I guess I don't go into town much. I usually stick to the West Wickham side of things. But to my US sensibilities they're all just hamlets of EC since they're so close.

Next time I'm there I'll ring you up for a pint at the White Bear.

Small world wot?


Look forward to it.
 
2014-08-04 05:49:02 PM  

deadlyplatypus: Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, U.S. Americans struggle to name 2 cities in the U.K.

Cambridge
Carlisle
Mildenhall
Penrith
Glasgow
Dumfries
Edinburgh
Lakenheath
Stirling
London
Falkirk
Swinden
Bury St. Edmunds
Birmingham
Aberdeen
Kilmarnock
Cardiff
Liverpool
Hexham
John o' Groats
Newcastle upon Trent...Tyne? (looked it up after I typed; Tyne is correct)
Belfast

...I think I'm tapped out

Nope, Worlington
Nottingham

...technically many of these are likely not "cities," don't know the definition of "city" in the UK


You left out the most important one: Leeds, whence came The Mekons.
 
2014-08-04 07:36:45 PM  
I apologise most sincerely for the idiocy of most of my fellow Brits.
 
2014-08-04 07:36:50 PM  

graeylin: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: iheartscotch: Tornados and the wizard of oz? At least they aren't asking if we still get ambushed by Indians. I actually had a French girl ask me about Indians while I was in Ireland. The answer is: they usually just hang out, build casinos, sell whiskey, fireworks and meth.

To be far that's what most Americans think about Kansas when they think of it. Has anything worth while came from that sad state?

Dwight David Eisenhower, Leader of the combined Allied Forces, director of the D-day invasion, proponent of the US Interstate system.
Langston Hughes, artist, author, poet
Charlie Parker, jazz musician
Joe Walsh, musician of some fame
Gale Sayers, kind of a decent footballer
James Naismith, inventor of basketball
Amelia Earhart, aviatrix
Koch brothers, own much of the world
Walter Chrysler, of the same motor company
Russell Stover, candy maker
R Lee Ermy, Dennis Hopper, Buster Keaton, actors
Erin Brockovich, activist


They all had to LEAVE Kansas to do anything noteworthy
 
2014-08-04 10:30:39 PM  

Forbidden Doughnut: // rural Oregon: less rain than outsiders may think, and more rednecks than hipsters....


Honestly grew up there, can't tell the two apart except one's a god damn desert...
 
2014-08-04 11:41:17 PM  

ThighsofGlory: I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!


Any idea what the TBH stands for?  I am at a loss.
 
2014-08-04 11:47:29 PM  

Ima4nic8or: ThighsofGlory: I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!

Any idea what the TBH stands for?  I am at a loss.


To be honest
 
2014-08-05 12:35:16 AM  

Ima4nic8or: ThighsofGlory: I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!

Any idea what the TBH stands for?  I am at a loss.


transformers Before Hoes

/ivesaidtoomuchalready
 
2014-08-05 02:00:24 AM  

Spiralmonkey: Ima4nic8or: ThighsofGlory: I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!

Any idea what the TBH stands for? I am at a loss.

To be honest


That biatch is Hot
 
2014-08-05 03:14:20 AM  

Ima4nic8or: ThighsofGlory: I live in No Idea TBH.

/Success!

Any idea what the TBH stands for?  I am at a loss.


Welcome to the internet. You're late.
 
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