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(YouTube) Video Saturday Cinema, 36 Hours, 1965 - German try conning a US soldier into revealing D-Day plans by convincing him he's been in a coma and the war is over. James Garner stars   (youtube.com) divider line 14
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820 clicks; posted to Video » on 02 Aug 2014 at 2:16 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-02 11:51:27 AM  
blog.aarp.org
James Garner stars as a US military major who's kidnapped shortly after attending a D-Day briefing. A clever Abhwer officer has dressed a building in Bavaria as a US hospital and printed up a mass of fake newspapers and the like to make it seem as though years have passed.

By 1944, the Germans knew an Allied invasion of Western Europe was coming but the big secret was where. The secrecy around this was the biggest con game in human history with Patton in charge of a phantom army near Pas de Calais to draw attention away from Normandy.

The recently deceased Garner plays the kidnapped D-Day planner who was waylaid on a trip to Lisbon and wakes up with grey hair and a room full of doctors telling him he's been suffering from a brain injury.

The Germans hopes to trick the soldier into revealing the allied invasion plans for western Europe.

The villain of the piece is a US citizen who was born in Germany played by Rod Taylor. He returned to the country of his birth to fight for Hitler but now that the tide is turning against the Fascist country, is scared himself. Rod Taylor plays the role and his job is to get Garner to reveal what he knows, without making Garner suspicious. Eva Marie Saint plays the love interest. She was a concentration camp victim who's been plucked from the prison camp to add to the set dressings. I'm not sure the North by Northwest star was perfect casting but she does what she can with the material with a generic 'European accent'.

The SS are impatient and skeptical of anything not obtained under torture. Once Garner's aware of the game, the film switches from a psychological thriller to a story focused upon escape. But, St-Marie's horrible experiences have made a deep impression on Garner and he can't just sprint off without her.

Dimitri Tiomkin handles the music and his efforts really help set the tone.

Oh, notice a production goof: When the car drops Garner off at his London headquarters at the beginning of the film, the street is illuminated by lamps. No streetlights were lighted in London during World War II in order to prevent bombers from using their light as guides to their target. The phoney newspapers given to Major Pike, dated 1950, refer to "President Wallace". Henry A. Wallace was Vice President of the United States in 1944, when the story actually takes place.

This movie features the both of the actors who played Sgt. Schultz in Stalag 17 and Hogan's Heroes.

The script is based upon the short story "Beware of the Dog" by famous children's writer Roald Dahl. That much simpler story is about a British airman who's shot down over the channel and the fake hospital is in occupied France.

Director George Seaton is given the official writing credit but one of the commenters on IMDB mentioned some of the back story to production that claims it was ghost-written: My father wrote the screen-play as a ghost writer and I wish he could have received the credit. Unfortunately, it was the way things operated at the time, he was blacklisted due to Senator McCarthy... I remember his toiling away on this plot and asking us for feedback. He was only able to sell the book rights. This was because he was at one time a temporary member of the communist party. As a result of this and being "blacklisted," he moved the family down to Mexico and continued writing under a pseudonym.

Link to last week's Saturday Cinema
Next Week's Saturday Cinema is a Juggernaut.
www.stubbornthings.org
 
2014-08-02 02:47:10 PM  
I was hoping for "Grand Prix" in memory of James Garner this week. One of my favorite movies and simply tons to discuss in terms of style, history and cinematography. Off the top of my head... the writers set out for a "Grand Hotel" type script which follows many stories all taking place at once rather than following one character over the course of a Formula 1 season. They also came up with a lot of neat tricks to film it. To get the sound of the engines right, they had former drivers running race cars on an empty airport run way, shifting at the appropriate intervals to mimic the sounds of driving at Monza, Monaco, Spa, etc. all from memory. They had extremely limited time to film in Monaco, so the actors only drove short sections at a time and in between takes they would race counter course back to where the scene needed to start. Garner said it was the most fun he ever had on a set... hauling ass the wrong way through the tunnel in a F2 car. The shots of Parabolica at Monza are some of the best footage I've seen of the now defunct corner. I wish I could see a modern machine take that banking, but there's the little problem of eminent death.

/Also would have been nice now that F1 is on break for a few weeks. *grumble*
//But, gaslight has never let me down and I'm quite intrigued by this film. Never seen it.
///I must have spilled my coffee in the form of words all over Fark.
 
2014-08-02 03:24:33 PM  
Frankenheimer's probably by favourite director. I'm holding off on Grand Prix because once I do it, that's it.

While I don't have an official metric for Saturday Cinema, I try to avoid really current films and obvious choices. The most recent one I did was Monsier Lazar 'cause this Oscar-nominated film was probably obscure to most Farkers and given Garner's passing, Grand Prix, Grand Prix was the obvious choice. For that reason I passed on it.

I really considered doing Support Your Local Sheriff, actually.

I don't really have a decision system for Sat Cinema other than follow the advice of Burt Lancaster and Clyde Gillmoure. Lancaster was a mega, mega, mega, mega, mega star of the 50s and 60s and who apparently chose scripts in an alternating cycle: one for the box office and one for the art houses. That's not a bad model to follow. The other dude, Gillmoure, was a broadcaster and newspaper columnist who was on the radio for most of my life. He had a programme called Gilmoure's Albums that could get anyone to listen to any piece of music. Once he made a case for a musical track, even if you hated that genre, you at least understood something about it.

Obviously, the other thing that goes into Sat Cinema is that there have to be some movie clips somewhere floating about. The object of the exercise is that I'm just a regular Farker who'll probably he here up until the lights get turned out and it's my contribution to help get discussions going and make the place fun.
 
2014-08-02 03:25:08 PM  
I can't remember if I saw this a long time ago, or if I've just seen so many Mission Impossibles and Twilight Zones with similar plots...

Is that Rod Taylor as a German, or Greg Morris with a mask?
 
2014-08-02 03:59:41 PM  

gaslight: Frankenheimer's probably by favourite director. I'm holding off on Grand Prix because once I do it, that's it.

While I don't have an official metric for Saturday Cinema, I try to avoid really current films and obvious choices. The most recent one I did was Monsier Lazar 'cause this Oscar-nominated film was probably obscure to most Farkers and given Garner's passing, Grand Prix, Grand Prix was the obvious choice. For that reason I passed on it.

I really considered doing Support Your Local Sheriff, actually.

I don't really have a decision system for Sat Cinema other than follow the advice of Burt Lancaster and Clyde Gillmoure. Lancaster was a mega, mega, mega, mega, mega star of the 50s and 60s and who apparently chose scripts in an alternating cycle: one for the box office and one for the art houses. That's not a bad model to follow. The other dude, Gillmoure, was a broadcaster and newspaper columnist who was on the radio for most of my life. He had a programme called Gilmoure's Albums that could get anyone to listen to any piece of music. Once he made a case for a musical track, even if you hated that genre, you at least understood something about it.

Obviously, the other thing that goes into Sat Cinema is that there have to be some movie clips somewhere floating about. The object of the exercise is that I'm just a regular Farker who'll probably he here up until the lights get turned out and it's my contribution to help get discussions going and make the place fun.


You're a good guy. You know what you did. Thanks.

Support Your Local Sheriff would have been a fun choice as well. Haven't watched it in years. My only copy of Grand Prix is on HDVD and my player has since died. Has lots of cool extras and mini documentaries on that disk. I suppose there will be some ultimate blu-ray version coming out soon, if there isn't already one. Hope it at least has the same content.
 
2014-08-02 05:10:31 PM  
I have seen it before, it is worth watching.
 
2014-08-02 05:34:36 PM  

gaslight: Frankenheimer's probably by favourite director. I'm holding off on Grand Prix because once I do it, that's it.

While I don't have an official metric for Saturday Cinema, I try to avoid really current films and obvious choices. The most recent one I did was Monsier Lazar 'cause this Oscar-nominated film was probably obscure to most Farkers and given Garner's passing, Grand Prix, Grand Prix was the obvious choice. For that reason I passed on it.

I really considered doing Support Your Local Sheriff, actually.

I don't really have a decision system for Sat Cinema other than follow the advice of Burt Lancaster and Clyde Gillmoure. Lancaster was a mega, mega, mega, mega, mega star of the 50s and 60s and who apparently chose scripts in an alternating cycle: one for the box office and one for the art houses. That's not a bad model to follow. The other dude, Gillmoure, was a broadcaster and newspaper columnist who was on the radio for most of my life. He had a programme called Gilmoure's Albums that could get anyone to listen to any piece of music. Once he made a case for a musical track, even if you hated that genre, you at least understood something about it.

Obviously, the other thing that goes into Sat Cinema is that there have to be some movie clips somewhere floating about. The object of the exercise is that I'm just a regular Farker who'll probably he here up until the lights get turned out and it's my contribution to help get discussions going and make the place fun.


Support your local Sheriff is awesome.  I like Paint your Wagon more, but that doesn't have James Garner.  Good job gaslight!
 
2014-08-02 06:26:57 PM  
If you like comic westerns from that period, George Kennedy was paired with Sinatra in an outing called Dirty Dingus Magee. Sinatra was now in the downside of his films and was making films about five years too late. Turns out Seaton did another WW2 thriller just before this one with the catch title the Counterfeit Traitor.

RoyBatty:  Is that Rod Taylor as a German
Yep.
 
2014-08-02 07:19:52 PM  
Wasn't this the plot of every Mission Impossible show?
 
2014-08-02 07:45:25 PM  
There's a Corbin Bernsen TV-movie remake called "Breaking Point" that's not bad.
 
2014-08-02 08:33:41 PM  

gaslight: If you like comic westerns from that period, George Kennedy was paired with Sinatra in an outing called Dirty Dingus Magee. Sinatra was now in the downside of his films and was making films about five years too late. Turns out Seaton did another WW2 thriller just before this one with the catch title the Counterfeit Traitor.

RoyBatty:  Is that Rod Taylor as a German
Yep.


I'm not convinced. I think it might be Greg Morris, Peter Lupus, maybe Barbara Bain or Martin Landau wearing an IMF mask.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-08-03 01:20:15 AM  
I once tried to con a UCLA cheerleader into revealing her DD boobs by convincing her that she had been in a coma and I was James Garner.

/not really
//they were actually B cups
 
2014-08-03 09:14:41 AM  
I had no idea the classic G.I. Joe episode "There's No Place Like Springfield" was based off of a James Garner movie.
 
2014-08-03 02:10:02 PM  
Thanks for the suggestion, I really enjoyed watching it.
 
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