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(WRAL)   Apartment maintenance worker enters your home and digs through your stuff? Seems legit. No crime committed here, Mr. Citizen   (wral.com) divider line 110
    More: Interesting, North Carolina  
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7058 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Aug 2014 at 11:54 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-02 09:12:38 AM  
That's creepy

/glad to be in a house
//also in Apex, NC
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-08-02 09:45:49 AM  
Set mousetraps in your underwear drawer. They'll learn.
 
2014-08-02 10:09:18 AM  
I don't have a GED in law, but it sure seems like it should be illegal. Someone riffling through my stuff certainly would interfere with my quiet enjoyment.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-08-02 10:10:22 AM  
EvilEgg

Interference with quiet enjoyment is not a crime. It is a breach of the rental contract.
 
2014-08-02 10:18:34 AM  
The worker caught on Kevin's security camera is Chris Caymin. WRAL's 5 On Your Side talked with him by phone.
"Technically, I didn't do anything wrong. Do what you have to do," he said and hung up.



Technically, your name will live forever on the internet at the underwear snoop.
wwwcache.wral.com
 
2014-08-02 10:50:19 AM  
North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.
 
2014-08-02 11:39:56 AM  
Someone needs an impromptu meeting with a Louisville Slugger
 
2014-08-02 11:57:42 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.


Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.
 
2014-08-02 11:59:15 AM  

MemeSlave: Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


Way to fight for the rights of the panty sniffer.
 
2014-08-02 11:59:41 AM  
FTFA: Photographer: David McCorkle

Thank god, I was wondering who took those stunning images.
 
2014-08-02 12:00:15 PM  
Seems reasonable. After all, if someone is growing marijuana or dabbling in porn, we and the authorities should be made aware. If you are doing nothing wrong you should have nothing to hide.
 
2014-08-02 12:01:44 PM  
Yea, this seems like a great thing to do in a state wear gun laws are well, kind of loose.
 
2014-08-02 12:03:40 PM  

phrawgh: Seems reasonable. After all, if someone is growing marijuana or dabbling in porn, we and the authorities should be made aware. If you are doing nothing wrong you should have nothing to hide.


If I were to make porn and dabble in marijuana... what's the stance on that? Hypothetically speaking, of course, because a friend asked.
 
2014-08-02 12:05:30 PM  

ElLoco: phrawgh: Seems reasonable. After all, if someone is growing marijuana or dabbling in porn, we and the authorities should be made aware. If you are doing nothing wrong you should have nothing to hide.

If I were to make porn and dabble in marijuana... what's the stance on that? Hypothetically speaking, of course, because a friend asked.


Obviously you shouldn't do it if children are in the area. If you do, the parents should have you arrested.
 
2014-08-02 12:07:46 PM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: FTFA: Photographer: David McCorkle

Thank god, I was wondering who took those stunning images.


Chuckled at that too until I realized it was a prompter dump that had been cleaned up, and was without the accompanying video, which is what he shot- they don't call them cameramen, they're photographers (at least in news media).

/tv news guy
//photographer
///so you could say I got a kick out of this reply, in a manner of speaking.
 
m00
2014-08-02 12:08:26 PM  

jaytkay: Way to fight for the rights of the panty sniffer.


Well I say we should label him a sex offender and put him on a government website.
 
TWX
2014-08-02 12:10:57 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


The Landlord/Tenant laws in my state were awesome when I had a landlord that wouldn't deal with some sewage drain problems. I got to deduct the days that I couldn't live there due to the problem, and they refunded my entire deposit at the end in an attempt to avoid having it get nasty.

The fundamental rule in Landlord/Tenant law here is written communication, and to prove that I used certified mail whenever notifying them. They even tried the BS of having separate companies for the management and the ownership of the property (though both were owned by the same people) and that didn't work out well for them either, as my lease was with the management company and I didn't give a rat's arse that the property owners were out of the country on vacation, this needed to be fixed now.

These laws were also written in plain English. They reminded me of school rules that would be used at a high school, and given that most of those that would need to follow them probably found their language skills topping-out at that point in their education that's just fine.
 
2014-08-02 12:12:04 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.


That sounds way too sensible.  Apartment associations have lobby groups.  I used to work for one.  What did they do?  They collected money from landlords to run credit checks on tenants, had a lobbyist department, published a monthly magazine and I think that was it.  I felt dirty working there and left after 6 months.  Fark them.
 
2014-08-02 12:12:14 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


Trolling on the internet is an unbecoming trait for a young lady.
 
2014-08-02 12:14:26 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


As part of its landlord/tenant laws a tenant can get court protection (restraining order) against a landlord who repeatedly issues 24-hour entry notices to harass or retaliate against a tenant. In some cases the tenant is entitled to further damages as well, such as paying the tenant's attorney fees and requiring the landlord to pay a penalty equal to one month's rent.
 
2014-08-02 12:18:25 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


The law should be a shield, not a sword. Properly written landlord/tenant laws can protect both parties from abuse.
 
2014-08-02 12:21:44 PM  
Very glad I own a home.
 
2014-08-02 12:26:00 PM  
It's scary how trusting we are so some random guy in a uniform.
 
2014-08-02 12:32:08 PM  
It's nice to know that for the rest of his life, anyone who googles for Chris Caymin is going to find articles about this.  At least he's got that going for him.

I must admit, I find it odd that people are complaining to the press about this.  If this was happening to me, and talking to the landlord/owner/whatever left me with a "We have a right to do it, so nothing is going to change" feeling, then I'd move.  I can't force you to be honest, but I wouldn't continue living there, either.
 
2014-08-02 12:33:24 PM  
When I was moving out of an apartment, years back, the maintenance people came in and stole DVDs, Aquarium stuff, electronics, and some books that hadn't been packed yet. When confronted, the office said "we thought you moved out" - despite the fact that it was the 26th, we were paid up until the end of the month, we hadn't dropped the keys off, and the moving truck was parked outside. The police just said it was a civil matter. I hope I never have to rent again.
 
2014-08-02 12:34:20 PM  

EvilEgg: I don't have a GED in law, but it sure seems like it should be illegal. Someone riffling through my stuff certainly would interfere with my quiet enjoyment.


Well, you didn't hear it, so itis quiet.
 
2014-08-02 12:34:33 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Very glad I own a home.


This - the rental market is farked.  I pay the same for my mortgage as I was paying for a one bedroom apartment.  As a bonus, I have about triple the square footage. I also own my washer and dryer rather than paying $35 a month to rent some shiatty washer/dryer combo.  I also don't have to worry about the rent going up when my lease expires and I have some equity.

Now if I can just get the county tax assessor to stop overvaluing it when he sends the tax bill everything would be awesome.
 
2014-08-02 12:37:24 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


I'm a landlord in Maine and the laws here are similar to those in Oregon. I have no problem whatsoever with the notification requirement and do it via email and a printed notice slipped under their door. I'm not sure how such a law could be used against me.
 
2014-08-02 12:40:48 PM  
I've in the past been quite glad for CT's fairly well defined rental laws. In the past I had to deal with a very shady landlord and found the laws to generally make sense.

In CT access by a landlord or their agent without notice and a legitimate reason is considered trespassing.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=fBLdU43aDtW3yATY3 Y KACQ&url=http://www.ct.gov/cachm/lib/cachm/Police_manual_-_final_as_ad opted_by_State%27s_Attorney.pdf&cd=2&ved=0CCkQFjAB&usg=AFQjCNGJl1IJ7uC ND6zYvmUoxuNgYeyboA&sig2=4mn9X6GvR36YkdI83BZH5g
 
2014-08-02 12:43:06 PM  
If I decide to get a GED in law, the first question I'd ask the professor computer is "What if this guy or one of his friends decided to retaliate and come back and kill the occupant. What liability does the apartment owner have? or is that taken care of in the "Stand Your Ground" law?"
 
2014-08-02 12:46:12 PM  
Take up amateur booby-trapping.
 
2014-08-02 12:48:53 PM  

MemeSlave: Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.

Laws are great until they're used against you.   More laws is not always better.


Tell me, how could that be used against someone who isn't up to no good?

Harassing a tenant isn't a legitimate thing to do.  Entry without notice in a non-emergency situation isn't either.

It's essentially the same as the law in my state.
 
2014-08-02 12:49:48 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: North Carolina needs to get some landlord/tenant laws similar to those in Oregon. Here the landlord is required in most cases to give 24-hour notice before entering a tenant occupied rental property. Exceptions such as in an emergency situation that needs immediate attention (fire, broken water pipes, etc.) or the tenant had requested repairs don't require a 24-hour notice. However, in the latter situation the repairs must be done during reasonable hours. Also, the landlord cannot use a 24-hour entry notice to harass or retaliate against you or inspect your personal belongings.


California is similar.  Of course it also helps to rent from honest operations.  The only times I've ever seen my manager and maintenance guy enter a unit without warning were 1) because a second floor unit had a leaking water heater (possibility of massive water damage to the unit, the unit below, and the building itself), and 2) to let the fire dept in because of the smoke coming out the door (dumbasses had left a pan of oil on a stove and gone out).
 
2014-08-02 12:49:50 PM  

lotus: When I was moving out of an apartment, years back, the maintenance people came in and stole DVDs, Aquarium stuff, electronics, and some books that hadn't been packed yet. When confronted, the office said "we thought you moved out" - despite the fact that it was the 26th, we were paid up until the end of the month, we hadn't dropped the keys off, and the moving truck was parked outside. The police just said it was a civil matter. I hope I never have to rent again.


That sounds more like burglary to me.  At least take them to small claims court if it hasn't been too long.  It's surprisingly easy and relatively inexpensive to file the paperwork and have them served.  I sued someone in small claims court with the help of a couple of books I borrowed from the library.  You could probably find the same info on the internet today.

I won my small claims case.  I didn't get awarded every penny I was asking for, but I got most of it.  Collecting the judgment is another matter, but the satisfaction of dragging them into court and having the judge agree with me was worth all the effort and court fees, which were less than $100.
 
2014-08-02 12:55:35 PM  
It would appear that NC doesn't have any applicable criminal law in this case.

But it would appear that the tenant in this case would be able to pursue a tort claim for trespass to chattels or invasion of privacy.  NC doesn't appear to require actual damages for that tort, so the tenant could pursue punitive damages against the maintenance man and might also have a case against the landlord given that it could be claimed that he was acting as their agent.
 
2014-08-02 01:06:44 PM  
I recommend one of these; wouldn't do without one.

sicarius.typepad.com

They cost maybe twelve to fifteen bucks at any hardware or home improvement store and take about ten minutes to install. They lock from the outside by sliding the chain into the lock mechanism and then require a key to unlock to enter the apartment. Great way to know when you come home, without actually having to install a second lock,  that a nosy employee hasn't been snooping. Sure they could break it off with a good kick but that would make it pretty obvious someone had been in your place who also had a key to the main deadbolt.
 
2014-08-02 01:18:39 PM  
Must not be any crime in NC, especially that town.

An outside cop might be curious how much loot the maintenance guy has at home, if only to solve lots of pending burglaries. If the guy's caught with stuff, from other apartment buildings, curiously managed by the same company, it might be a good time to investigate the active involvement of managment.
 
2014-08-02 01:19:27 PM  

MrKevvy: I recommend one of these; wouldn't do without one.

[sicarius.typepad.com image 345x295]

They cost maybe twelve to fifteen bucks at any hardware or home improvement store and take about ten minutes to install. They lock from the outside by sliding the chain into the lock mechanism and then require a key to unlock to enter the apartment. Great way to know when you come home, without actually having to install a second lock,  that a nosy employee hasn't been snooping. Sure they could break it off with a good kick but that would make it pretty obvious someone had been in your place who also had a key to the main deadbolt.


Illegal and relatively useless.  This guy knew somebody had been there because of the cameras, and in fact had requested maintenance to fix the dryer, so would have left it unlocked anyway.

Installation requires holes in the door and jamb, thus damaging property.  Adding locks to a rental property without landlord permission is illegal in most states.  If you're going to do it anyway, might as well change the deadbolt, it's actually somewhat effective and isn't any more illegal.
 
2014-08-02 01:20:11 PM  
So, it's safe to say that Chris Caymin is an underwear snoop. Let's make sure we get this on record.
 
2014-08-02 01:27:51 PM  

DarkVader: Illegal and relatively useless.  This guy knew somebody had been there because of the cameras, and in fact had requested maintenance to fix the dryer, so would have left it unlocked anyway.

Installation requires holes in the door and jamb, thus damaging property.  Adding locks to a rental property without landlord permission is illegal in most states.  If you're going to do it anyway, might as well change the deadbolt, it's actually somewhat effective and isn't any more illegal.


I don't live "in most states" so the laws are different here. The holes added are tiny and no different than hanging a picture. And it's already saved me once... I got a call at work from the maintenance saying they needed access to my unit because of a water leak and there was a chain on. I told them I was just leaving so I would let them in in 30 mins. When I got home, they were gone and there was no leak anywhere.. it was in another unit and they thought it was coming from mine, so it was totally unnecessary.

Without this device, they would have come in and done who-knows-what. The last time they chopped huge holes in the bathroom drywall big enough to walk through and left it for days like this. Did I mention I got this thing because I've items go missing? So your "relatively useless" conclusion is also not applicable.
 
2014-08-02 01:37:19 PM  
This anti-apartment article is brought to you by the home mortgage lending industry.

GET A HOUSE MORTGAGE, SUCKERS!!
 
2014-08-02 01:39:05 PM  

DarkVader: Illegal and relatively useless.


It's not illegal.  It may violate your lease, but that's a civil matter.

Whether or not it's useless is arguable.
 
2014-08-02 01:47:02 PM  
Read the renter's agreement before signing. Most reputable complexes belong to apartment associations and follow set guidelines.
 
2014-08-02 01:47:12 PM  
You can`t change the locks but you can add something that means only you can open the door. Some form of external device that stops the door handle turning unless a radio signal is sent. With the right lock/handle it could be as simple as a stepper motor and a bit of wood acting like a chock...

You could always swap out the handle for one that would be easy to stop turning and put the original back if you move out.

Locks not changed, no damage to property and if the landlord isn`t coming in without your knowledge it will never be an issue.
 
2014-08-02 01:57:30 PM  
Caymin was fired but not charged with breaking in because he had a key, and Kevin didn't notice anything missing.

Wrong move, dude. This was the time to report your collection of American Gold Eagles suddenly having vanished. Get his ass prosecuted and sue the hell out of your landlord for the loss.
 
m00
2014-08-02 02:01:16 PM  

jjorsett: Caymin was fired but not charged with breaking in because he had a key, and Kevin didn't notice anything missing.

Wrong move, dude. This was the time to report your collection of American Gold Eagles suddenly having vanished. Get his ass prosecuted and sue the hell out of your landlord for the loss.


You'd need receipts.
 
2014-08-02 02:02:06 PM  

MrKevvy: And it's already saved me once... I got a call at work from the maintenance saying they needed access to my unit because of a water leak and there was a chain on. I told them I was just leaving so I would let them in in 30 mins. When I got home, they were gone and there was no leak anywhere.. it was in another unit and they thought it was coming from mine, so it was totally unnecessary.


What if it had been your unit that was leaking and they couldn't get a hold you? Completely locking out the people that own the building and preventing them from performing emergency maintenance is never a good idea. If you want them to stop looking through your stuff, do something else.
 
2014-08-02 02:02:46 PM  

MrKevvy: I recommend one of these; wouldn't do without one. [chain lock pic]


Can you tell me how to lock that when I leave the house?.

TV's Vinnie: This anti-apartment article is brought to you by the home mortgage lending industry.


And then they'll take it away from you in a scam foreclosure.

/Mr. Negative today.
 
2014-08-02 02:12:20 PM  

phrawgh: ElLoco: phrawgh: Seems reasonable. After all, if someone is growing marijuana or dabbling in porn, we and the authorities should be made aware. If you are doing nothing wrong you should have nothing to hide.

If I were to make porn and dabble in marijuana... what's the stance on that? Hypothetically speaking, of course, because a friend asked.

Obviously you shouldn't do it if children are in the area. If you do, the parents should have you arrested.


As long as you keep your porn and marijuana under lock and key. They won't have a chance to escape to rape, kill and eat the local children.
 
2014-08-02 02:13:06 PM  

bmr68: Read the renter's agreement before signing. Most reputable complexes belong to apartment associations and follow set guidelines.


Yeah, and they usually use boiler plate lease agreements written by those apartment associations.  Those leases are written by lawyers very carefully giving every edge possible to the landlord.

funny story, bro

I once forgot to pay my rent by one day, probably because I was drunk off my ass.  It wasn't a matter of being able or willing to pay my rent, I just forgot.

So, it's Saturday afternoon and I'm dead asleep when I awoke to the sound of someone unlocking my door and entering my apartment.   I didn't hear anyone knocking, but maybe they did.  I jumped out of bed and upon sort of realizing it what was going on I said "WTF are you doing coming in here at 4 in the morning."

She pointed out that it was actually 4 in the afternoon.

They take not getting paid seriously and send out eviction notices as soon as they can because if there is a deadbeat you don't want to fark around giving them more chances to pay while they basically squat on your property.

In all my years of living in apartments, I only was late with the rent twice - the other time was a similar situation.  I got drunk and forgot.  It's just that the 2nd time they left the notice on my door while I was at work instead of entering and leaving it on the kitchen counter.  I weaseled my way out of the 2nd late payment by claiming I had left it in the drop box and they must have missed it (a total lie, but whatever).

But the real biatch of it is, beyond the late fees, they then demand payment in the form of a cashier's check or money order.  Your personal checks are suddenly no good despite the fact that you have been living there for years and never had a check bounce before.  That's just rubbing salt into your wounds.

Like Eddy Murphy said "Kill my landlord".
 
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