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(Daily Express)   Global warming? You haven't seen global warming. THIS is global warming. And you won't need a hockeystick graph to know it's here   (express.co.uk) divider line 99
    More: Scary  
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9187 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Aug 2014 at 11:33 AM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-02 08:19:48 AM  
FTA Caption: "The earth would be obliterated if the sun was to send out a flare"

...wow... Hope THAT never happens!

Oh wait, it happens all the time?

... Well OK then.
 
2014-08-02 09:20:05 AM  
Alarmist is alarming the alarm to warn us about something that WILL END ALL COMMUNICATIONS AS WE KNOW THEM!

Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...

Space is scary. I mean unbelievably scary. The Long Dark will kill you in ways that you cannot even imagine. The vacuum will boil you, radiation will cook your cells, tiny objects can reach absolutely ridiculous speeds and pass straight through you, your body's reflexes honed within a gravity well will cause you to make mistakes that cause you to perform acts that are suicidal in space, there are masses, that we haven't detected, that are hurtling through the distances that if they hit our wee blue marble would crack the mantle and end all life as we know it in a flash, our sun can cook us, and when it reaches its final phases, it will destroy pretty damn much everything within our system and spread the mass throughout our region of space in a long tumble through the night. There are bodies out in the Long Dark that tumble and emit radiation enough to cook everything in our solar system--albeit moving fairly slowly and at distances now that we might get a warning before they do us in. If the center of our galaxy explodes, and it's entirely possible that it will, it will obliterate everything in our region of space--again, in a time frame that seems incredibly long, but the wave of destruction would eventually arrive and strip this system of anything resembling life. Space is terrifying if you look at it long enough, because it simply doesn't care about anything on this planet. Not you, not your Nana, not our civilization, not the birds, not the trees, not the microbes, not the worms, not the majesty of our mountains, not the cool rivers, not the thundering ocean. The Long Dark doesn't care about you, and it will eventually scrub this planet clean of life, and possibly smash this rock we're hurtling around the galaxy upon to component parts, and there is little we can do about that. What we can do, is accept that there is a lot we cannot do a damn thing about, and get on with living, and realize that the time frames for much of the devastation that awaits our home is on a time scale that humanity isn't even capable of understanding in any useful way, and live our lives, and treat those around us with some respect and dignity to give those lives purpose and meaning in our very limited way.

Stop freaking out about the fact that the Long Dark will end everything. It always has been, it will be that way when we are gone and the squids become the dominant sophonts on this planet. You. Will. Die. Everything around you will die. Except perhaps Abe Vigoda, who will continue on, and tell our tale to the cephalopods and their progeny, and hopefully he will tell them of noble things...
 
2014-08-02 09:31:23 AM  
Someone should break the condenser on that guy's air conditioning unit.
 
2014-08-02 10:20:23 AM  
Scientists from SolarMAX gathered at the International Space University in France where they concluded advanced space-weather forecasting is the best solution.

How exactly is advanced space weather forecasting any kind of solution here?

You have enough time to get a tweet out "It's happening" and then what?
 
2014-08-02 10:22:43 AM  

hubiestubert: Except perhaps Abe Vigoda, who will continue on, and tell our tale to the cephalopods and their progeny, and hopefully he will tell them of noble things...


^__^.

Nice post, Hubie!

/A jape, a jest, eternal rest.
//That's life, innit?
 
2014-08-02 10:26:58 AM  

quatchi: Scientists from SolarMAX gathered at the International Space University in France where they concluded advanced space-weather forecasting is the best solution.

How exactly is advanced space weather forecasting any kind of solution here?

You have enough time to get a tweet out "It's happening" and then what?


Then it happens and a thousand years of darkness and Lord Humongous will roam the Outback or something.
 
2014-08-02 10:34:56 AM  

Nefarious: quatchi: Scientists from SolarMAX gathered at the International Space University in France where they concluded advanced space-weather forecasting is the best solution.

How exactly is advanced space weather forecasting any kind of solution here?


You have enough time to get a tweet out "It's happening" and then what?

Then it happens and a thousand years of darkness and Lord Humongous will roam the Outback or something.


As long as we have time for a quick "end of the world" thread here at Fark I'll be happy.

/Who knew Lord Humongous was a fan of silly Aussie themed steak houses?
 
2014-08-02 10:37:20 AM  

quatchi: Nefarious: quatchi: Scientists from SolarMAX gathered at the International Space University in France where they concluded advanced space-weather forecasting is the best solution.

How exactly is advanced space weather forecasting any kind of solution here?

You have enough time to get a tweet out "It's happening" and then what?

Then it happens and a thousand years of darkness and Lord Humongous will roam the Outback or something.

As long as we have time for a quick "end of the world" thread here at Fark I'll be happy.

/Who knew Lord Humongous was a fan of silly Aussie themed steak houses?


He's a sucker for the bloomin' onions
 
2014-08-02 11:15:47 AM  

hubiestubert: Alarmist is alarming the alarm to warn us about something that WILL END ALL COMMUNICATIONS AS WE KNOW THEM!

Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...

Space is scary. I mean unbelievably scary. The Long Dark will kill you in ways that you cannot even imagine. The vacuum will boil you, radiation will cook your cells, tiny objects can reach absolutely ridiculous speeds and pass straight through you, your body's reflexes honed within a gravity well will cause you to make mistakes that cause you to perform acts that are suicidal in space, there are masses, that we haven't detected, that are hurtling through the distances that if they hit our wee blue marble would crack the mantle and end all life as we know it in a flash, our sun can cook us, and when it reaches its final phases, it will destroy pretty damn much everything within our system and spread the mass throughout our region of space in a long tumble through the night. There are bodies out in the Long Dark that tumble and emit radiation enough to cook everything in our solar system--albeit moving fairly slowly and at distances now that we might get a warning before they do us in. If the center of our galaxy explodes, and it's entirely possible that it will, it will obliterate everything in our region of space--again, in a time frame that seems incredibly long, but the wave of destruction would eventually arrive and strip this system of anything resembling life. Space is terrifying if you look at it long enough, because it simply doesn't care about anything on this planet. Not you, not your Nana, not our civilization, not the birds, not the trees, not the microbes, not the worms, not the majesty of our mountains, not the cool rivers, not the thundering ocean. The Long Dark doesn't care about you, and it will eventually scrub this planet clean of life, and possibly smash this rock we're hurtling around the galaxy upo ...




I've... seen things you people wouldn't believe... Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those... moments... will be lost in time, like... tears... in... rain. Time... to die...
 
2014-08-02 11:45:01 AM  
Pathetic earthlings. Hurling your bodies out into the void, without the slightest inkling of who or what is out here. If you had known anything about the true nature of the universe, anything at all, you would've hidden from it in terror.

/Flash! a-ah.
 
ecl
2014-08-02 11:45:19 AM  

Shostie: hubiestubert: Alarmist is alarming the alarm to warn us about something that WILL END ALL COMMUNICATIONS AS WE KNOW THEM!

Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...

Space is scary. I mean unbelievably scary. The Long Dark will kill you in ways that you cannot even imagine. The vacuum will boil you, radiation will cook your cells, tiny objects can reach absolutely ridiculous speeds and pass straight through you, your body's reflexes honed within a gravity well will cause you to make mistakes that cause you to perform acts that are suicidal in space, there are masses, that we haven't detected, that are hurtling through the distances that if they hit our wee blue marble would crack the mantle and end all life as we know it in a flash, our sun can cook us, and when it reaches its final phases, it will destroy pretty damn much everything within our system and spread the mass throughout our region of space in a long tumble through the night. There are bodies out in the Long Dark that tumble and emit radiation enough to cook everything in our solar system--albeit moving fairly slowly and at distances now that we might get a warning before they do us in. If the center of our galaxy explodes, and it's entirely possible that it will, it will obliterate everything in our region of space--again, in a time frame that seems incredibly long, but the wave of destruction would eventually arrive and strip this system of anything resembling life. Space is terrifying if you look at it long enough, because it simply doesn't care about anything on this planet. Not you, not your Nana, not our civilization, not the birds, not the trees, not the microbes, not the worms, not the majesty of our mountains, not the cool rivers, not the thundering ocean. The Long Dark doesn't care about you, and it will eventually scrub this planet clean of life, and possibly smash this rock we're hurtling around ...


I can haz lens flare?
 
2014-08-02 11:45:51 AM  

hubiestubert: Alarmist is alarming the alarm to warn us about something that WILL END ALL COMMUNICATIONS AS WE KNOW THEM!

Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...


THIS

I'm guessing that things like life support systems or pacemakers might be a problem, but for most people it means losing facebook for a few hours. Oh no, the horrors!
 
2014-08-02 11:47:25 AM  
FTFA: Ashley Dale, member of international task force SolarMAX set up to identify the risks of a solar storm, said: "Without power, people would struggle to fuel their cars at petrol stations, get money from cash dispensers or pay online.

First World Problems
 
2014-08-02 11:51:16 AM  
Related articles: blood moon will bring DOOM! rare honey moon will bring DOOM! super moon will bring DOOM!
 
2014-08-02 11:55:49 AM  
FTA: "Killer solar superstorm could destroy Earth at ANY MOMENT, scientists warn"

Except it hasn't in the last few million years, so I'm not expecting it any time soon.
 
2014-08-02 11:57:45 AM  
Never mind that, they've spotted a square cloud in Exeter!
 
2014-08-02 12:02:16 PM  
img2u.info
Maybe the earth should move a little bit away from the sun.

What kind of rag is the 'Express', anyway? 10 billion Hiroshima bombs would certainly be bad hitting the Earth, but what's implied is not what was actually said. That referred to the force at the sun, which still has to eject material that has to travel (and lose energy and disperse) over 75 million miles. It doesn't exactly equate to the dumb picture or to even a single nuclear bomb going off on the earth.
 
2014-08-02 12:02:59 PM  
 
2014-08-02 12:09:48 PM  
What the hell website is this? What did I just read?!
 
2014-08-02 12:10:49 PM  
The Daily Express appears to have gone off the rails with this one.

Running around and screaming "SCIENCE!" does not make you a scientist, it makes you look like an idiot. This article is the equivalent of that.
 
2014-08-02 12:13:29 PM  
That website is even worse than......it's worse than the politics tab. It's worse than Hitler.
 
2014-08-02 12:15:12 PM  
For those interested in REAL science, we just narrowly missed a major CME in 2012:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/news/fast-cme.html
 
2014-08-02 12:16:46 PM  
Every.  Body.  Panic.
 
2014-08-02 12:16:50 PM  
 
2014-08-02 12:17:36 PM  
Not.
 
2014-08-02 12:20:10 PM  
NASA scientists say Carrington-level event happens every 150 years with the next one currently five years overdue.

So it's on a fairly regular schedule then? I didn't think it worked that way, but then I'm no science writer.
 
2014-08-02 12:23:14 PM  
This will absolutely, definitely occur between now and the next fifteen billion years.  If you want to get all Britishy about it, "the next fifteen milliard years".  So, I reccommend the following actions to be taken immediately:

1: Tea Partiers and fundamentalist Christian Republicans: spend every last penny on a survival shelter.  Do not emerge, especially to vote.

2: Normal human beings:  set about fixing the damage done during the past thirty or forty years by group #1 above.   Try not to take more than thirty or forty years.  Make housing, healthcare, education, and equality some of the major foci.  Try very hard to limit the power of both churches and corporations.  I'd recommend a Constitutional amendment here in the US, and a world treaty at the UN level.

3: Once we've minimized the effect of political, economic, and social effects of religion , businesses, and internecine hatred, we're gonna need to pour scads of money into research on a: healthcare research, and b: space exploration.  Give out huge grants for basic science to the smartest people in the world.  Give out equally huge grants for applied science for really smart, incredibly compassionate people who have shown the ability to integrate both of those traits.  I'm not one of the smartest  people in the world, but I'm fairly bright and rather nice to others, so a nice stipend to let me continue teaching and doing research would be great.  A bit of enhancement to facilitate a mountain chalet wouldn't hurt, but simply cancelling every student loan in the world would accomplish the same thing.

4: every seven years, all debts are forgiven.  Hey, gotta be something in the Bible worth keeping.  That "don't kill" part is nice too.  Make the only capital crime be the combination of sexual abuse and murder of a child.  Carry out the sentence in public, and use dull sporks.

5: Demi Lovato and Selina Gomez need to be washed and brought to my chambers on a regular basis.  It will be totally up to them who does what to whom, but I at least get to watch.*

*I would gladly forfeit #5, and in fact undergo castration (under suitably medical and anesthetized conditions, of course), if the other conditions could be put into action.
 
2014-08-02 12:24:45 PM  
Life, it will end.


/deal with it
 
2014-08-02 12:28:43 PM  
So the headline and the image imply the world would be fried, but the article and reality are primarily just overwhelming electromagnetic damage.

Yeah. Chill out.
 
2014-08-02 12:31:12 PM  

hubiestubert: Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror... ...


You're overlooking one critical difference, alarmist hype notwithstanding. When the Carrington Event occurred in 1859, the induced current was so intense it shocked telegraph operators, fried their power supplies and started countless fires. Today a similar event would fry virtually every computer and computer-like device (cell phones, electronic controllers, etc.) on much if not the entire world.

Oh, and it would halt nearly all modern transportation. Cars would not run. Airplanes would not fly and the trucks and many of the trains we rely on would be rendered inert. Pumps wouldn't move water. Power to your house would be out for months if not longer. No food in the supermarket. And on and on and on.

It short it would be the greatest disaster to ever hit modern humanity. Equal in impact to the Black Plague hitting Europe in the middle ages, and the European diseases being introduced to the New World a few centuries later. Worse than all the wars of the 19th and 20th centuries combined. Billions would perish, and it would knock most of humanity back to the early 20th century level of technology for a century or more.

The geophysical record shows it happens on average every 500 years, so belittle the danger all you wish, but just understand that doing so is like living in San Francisco and denying the "Big One" could hit at any time.
 
2014-08-02 12:31:45 PM  
mmmm... Yeah. And gamma ray events can basically cook and curdle anything organic in entire chunks of a galaxy.
 
2014-08-02 12:35:48 PM  

Guuberre: FTFA: Ashley Dale, member of international task force SolarMAX set up to identify the risks of a solar storm, said: "Without power, people would struggle to fuel their cars at petrol stations, get money from cash dispensers or pay online.

First World Problems


That's how out of touch with reality the majority of people are on this shiat hole of a planet. Their idea of survival is going to the grocery store to buy food using a piece of plastic. I cannot wait until the real survival beings, cause 99% of earth will fix the problem by dying.
 
2014-08-02 12:38:33 PM  

Farkamajig: Never mind that, they've spotted a square cloud in Exeter!


And there's a sale at Penny's

crankyfliercom.c.presscdn.com
 
2014-08-02 12:40:20 PM  
So let's make the atmosphere more transparent to these events Republicans!
 
2014-08-02 12:44:00 PM  
The only potential "devastation" these could cause is things like interruption in emergency services. No radios, no dispatchers. People who get hurt would be stuck, and people who take advantage of this kind of shiat would be taking advantage. That, and losing power/heat in the winter in cold climates, or A/C in places like Phoenix, where humans were never meant to even see, let alone live in, would result in some people dying.

Otherwise, after a relatively short time, services would start to be restored, and things would go back to normal. Yes, it could be a pretty major event, and we could have issues, but they write these Chicken Little stories only slightly more often than these events occur.
 
2014-08-02 12:45:06 PM  
Is Express the new Daily Fail?
 
2014-08-02 01:00:53 PM  

rogue49: Life, it will end.


/deal with it


It's not death itself I fear but my manner of dying. I wouldn't want to die in this way, that's for sure.
 
2014-08-02 01:14:25 PM  
static3.hln.be
Is it a superflare? Because superflares are nothing like normal flares.
 
2014-08-02 01:14:49 PM  

elkboy: FTA Caption: "The earth would be obliterated if the sun was to send out a flare"

...wow... Hope THAT never happens!

Oh wait, it happens all the time?

... Well OK then.


This is what always bothered me about the movie "Knowing" (well, besides several other things about that movie). Any flare leaving the sun dissipates, doesn't it? Unless the sun really can send a large fire-y strand of itself several million miles into the Earth. But that always seemed like a soccer ball with incredible aim managing to hit a pea 1000 ft.

And then there are all the religious youtube commenters who say that ending is "reassuring." Yeah. Because apocalyptic death is so warm and fuzzy. Really. All Disney movies should end the same way.
 
2014-08-02 01:23:04 PM  
Ahh, the Express.  The Mail's retarded relative.  A paper that can be safely ignored.
 
2014-08-02 01:37:59 PM  

Stone Meadow: hubiestubert: Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror... ...

You're overlooking one critical difference, alarmist hype notwithstanding. When the Carrington Event occurred in 1859, the induced current was so intense it shocked telegraph operators, fried their power supplies and started countless fires. Today a similar event would fry virtually every computer and computer-like device (cell phones, electronic controllers, etc.) on much if not the entire world.

Oh, and it would halt nearly all modern transportation. Cars would not run. Airplanes would not fly and the trucks and many of the trains we rely on would be rendered inert. Pumps wouldn't move water. Power to your house would be out for months if not longer. No food in the supermarket. And on and on and on.

It short it would be the greatest disaster to ever hit modern humanity. Equal in impact to the Black Plague hitting Europe in the middle ages, and the European diseases being introduced to the New World a few centuries later. Worse than all the wars of the 19th and 20th centuries combined. Billions would perish, and it would knock most of humanity back to the early 20th century level of technology for a century or more.

The geophysical record shows it happens on average every 500 years, so belittle the danger all you wish, but just understand that doing so is like living in San Francisco and denying the "Big One" could hit at any time.


You're forgetting a key detail here, the reason the telegraph system suffered so much damage is because at the time of the Carrington Event, the telegraphy system was comprised of MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND HOLY FARKING CHRIST HOW LONG BEFORE WE HIT CIVILIZATION MILES of unregulated copper wire. Not so much now. No, our cell phones would survive. Our satellites might have a little bit of trouble. Our cars? Hah, we run them off of 12V lead acid batteries, many still use starter coils. Please. Our local power grid? Might be down for a day. National power grid? See local power grid.

Electronics are far more elegant now, we worry about things like bleeder circuits even in modern ICs. Our power stations have redundancies. Hell, ever heard of a GFCI? This ain't the 1800's lady.
 
2014-08-02 01:43:10 PM  

hubiestubert: Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...


Don't know how old you are, but way back when, I worked with hardware that was still mostly using the old electromechanical-type tech that was the latest and greatest back in the 1800s. Being mostly heavy-gauge (by today's standards) wire, passive components, and the occasional discrete transistor, it would have had a pretty good chance of surviving a big solar flare intact. Our current stuff is much much much more vulnerable because the overvoltages induced in it would destroy the integrated circuits that make it work. And such ICs are everywhere these days, in virtually every device that uses electricity, which means that suddenly every electrical device there is would cease to function. Even if our personal devices miraculously survived, we'd have no power to run them anyway because the generation facilities would be shut down. We'd be plunged into the dark ages in an instant, unable to move, communicate, or obtain light, food, or water. The survival of our 1800s tech in no way should be taken as reassurance that our current stuff will. We should be taking steps right now to upgrade it and make it survivable, the way we did for the Y2K "crisis". Bonus: it would also aid in surviving an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack via nuke.
 
2014-08-02 02:05:33 PM  

jjorsett: hubiestubert: Yet, somehow didn't manage to wipe out the entire world's telegraph net when it occurred last. Truly, we should all live in abject terror...

Don't know how old you are, but way back when, I worked with hardware that was still mostly using the old electromechanical-type tech that was the latest and greatest back in the 1800s. Being mostly heavy-gauge (by today's standards) wire, passive components, and the occasional discrete transistor, it would have had a pretty good chance of surviving a big solar flare intact. Our current stuff is much much much more vulnerable because the overvoltages induced in it would destroy the integrated circuits that make it work. And such ICs are everywhere these days, in virtually every device that uses electricity, which means that suddenly every electrical device there is would cease to function. Even if our personal devices miraculously survived, we'd have no power to run them anyway because the generation facilities would be shut down. We'd be plunged into the dark ages in an instant, unable to move, communicate, or obtain light, food, or water. The survival of our 1800s tech in no way should be taken as reassurance that our current stuff will. We should be taking steps right now to upgrade it and make it survivable, the way we did for the Y2K "crisis". Bonus: it would also aid in surviving an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack via nuke.


Even modern ICs have redundant bleeder circuits. You know, because we don't want people or technicians getting electrocuted because of something we call "capacitors." We learned that lesson back when we still used these funny looking things called "vacuum tubes."

Nice try.
 
2014-08-02 02:24:25 PM  
You're forgetting a key detail here, the reason the telegraph system suffered so much damage is because at the time of the Carrington Event, the telegraphy system was comprised of MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND HOLY FARKING CHRIST HOW LONG BEFORE WE HIT CIVILIZATION MILES of unregulated copper wire. Not so much now. No, our cell phones would survive. Our satellites might have a little bit of trouble. Our cars? Hah, we run them off of 12V lead acid batteries, many still use starter coils. Please. Our local power grid? Might be down for a day. National power grid? See local power grid.

For the most part, THIS

However magnetic storms can last for 2 weeks. During that time any blown transformers that are replaced will just blow again. After the storm passes, it will probably take a week for the power to be completely restored due to the amount of work involved and possibly a parts shortage (most power companies do not keep enough spare transformers on hand to replace them all). Power outages and when they occur (power outage last winter was scary, but the one this summer was hardly noticed) are the real problem.
 
2014-08-02 02:34:44 PM  
No worries, Anonymoys will just DDoS the Sun.
 
2014-08-02 02:46:09 PM  
Larry Niven, Inconstant Moon.
We were warned back in 1971.
 
2014-08-02 03:18:15 PM  

iq_in_binary: You're forgetting a key detail here, the reason the telegraph system suffered so much damage is because at the time of the Carrington Event, the telegraphy system was comprised of MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND MILES AND HOLY FARKING CHRIST HOW LONG BEFORE WE HIT CIVILIZATION MILES of unregulated copper wire. Not so much now. No, our cell phones would survive. Our satellites might have a little bit of trouble. Our cars? Hah, we run them off of 12V lead acid batteries, many still use starter coils. Please. Our local power grid? Might be down for a day. National power grid? See local power grid.

Electronics are far more elegant now, we worry about things like bleeder circuits even in modern ICs. Our power stations have redundancies. Hell, ever heard of a GFCI? This ain't the 1800's lady

.

NOAA disagrees with your conclusions: Solar flares can disrupt power grids, interfere with high-frequency airline and military communications, disrupt Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, interrupt civilian communications, and blanket the Earth's upper atmosphere with hazardous radiation.

NASA disagrees with your conclusions: Lanzerotti points out that as electronic technologies have become more sophisticated and more embedded into everyday life, they have also become more vulnerable to solar activity. On Earth, power lines and long-distance telephone cables might be affected by auroral currents, as happened in 1989. Radar, cell phone communications, and GPS receivers could be disrupted by solar radio noise. Experts who have studied the question say there is little to be done to protect satellites from a Carrington-class flare. In fact, a recent paper estimates potential damage to the 900-plus satellites currently in orbit could cost between $30 billion and $70 billion. The best solution, they say: have a pipeline of comsats ready for launch.

The American Academy for the Advancement of Science, the USAF and industry experts disagree with your conclusions: But the big fear is what might happen to the electrical grid, since power surges caused by solar particles could blow out giant transformers. Such transformers can take a long time to replace, especially if hundreds are destroyed at once, said Baker, who is a co-author of a National Research Council report on solar-storm risks.

Even if your cell phone itself is not destroyed, the infrastructure that makes it so useful may well be, rendering it effectively inert. After all, a cell phone cannot even talk to another cell phone in the same room...they HAVE to go through a tower that is itself subject to damage and is completely dependent on a constant supply of electricity.

And even if SOME infrastructure is hardened, city water and emergency response systems often are not. Heck even point-of-sales systems in your supermarket are highly vulnerable. A couple of years ago my local supermarket suffered a power outage while I was inside. Even though the lights came back on within seconds, the computers failed and the store could not continue sales. They couldn't even take cash since the scanners and registers didn't work.

The good news is that every time a minor flare screws things up here, SOME improvement is made, but the cautionary note is 1) not quickly enough, and 2) not against Carrington-scale events. Meanwhile, society just gets more and more dependent on the very systems most vulnerable.
 
2014-08-02 03:33:16 PM  

Spectrum: NASA scientists say Carrington-level event happens every 150 years with the next one currently five years overdue.

So it's on a fairly regular schedule then? I didn't think it worked that way, but then I'm no science writer.


Neither is anyone at the Express, apparently. Also, by their, um, reasoning, since a Carrington-level event just missed Earth two years ago, we should be safe for another 148 years or so.
 
2014-08-02 03:41:07 PM  
I like the professionalism that this paper presents.
 
2014-08-02 03:44:38 PM  
Stone Meadow:
NOAA disagrees with your conclusions:

NASA disagrees with your conclusions:

Proving my point again, Quebec was out of power for...wait for it, this is really devastating stuff here: 9 WHOLE HOURS! MY GOD! THE HUMANITY!

That's about the worst Lanzerotti was worried about, by his own admission, in the article you just cited.

The American Academy for the Advancement of Science, the USAF and industry experts disagree with your conclusions:  .

And here's why, from the article:

Finally comes a coronal mass ejection, or CME, a slower moving cloud of charged particles that can take several days to reach Earth's atmosphere. When a CME hits, the solar particles can interact with Earth's magnetic field to produce powerful electromagnetic fluctuations.

Because he knows that. We have eyes on the sun now, we'd see it coming from a mile away. We can power off the satellites and our powergrid for the hour or so that we'd be passing through the CME. And we already have plans in place to do exactly that.

Quit buying into the fearmongering, that's all those articles are meant to do is inspire fear.
 
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