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(When On Earth)   Make no bones about it, the "Killing Caves" of the Khmer Rouge is an emotionally powerful tourist destination   (whenonearth.net) divider line 54
    More: Sad, Khmer Rouge, Pol Pot, Cambodia  
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6832 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Aug 2014 at 8:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-08-02 03:48:52 AM  
I've been to Cambodia twice, and seen exhibits, including the Killing Fields. But I didn't know about the caves.

I remember when I read the news in 1978, it was like "You will never believe what happened in Cambodia in the last 3 years while they didn't allow any reporters in". Then proceeded to tell a story just like the holocaust, but instead of Jews being evacuated from cities and ghettos by cattle cars to the concentration camps, it was ALL of Phnom Penh evacuated by walking. And the first reports of murders of anyone involved with education, of having any education, of speaking any foreign language, of wearing glasses, etc.

Unlike the holocaust, it was an auto-genocide, with a quarter of the population slaughtered.
 
2014-08-02 08:28:44 AM  
That was a great read. It was clearly not written by some content generating hack. It certainly isn't a mad scramble in spots to string together enough drivel to satisfy the minimum word count. It is also obvious that the author actually traveled to this place.
 
2014-08-02 08:30:07 AM  
I've been to the one on Battambang it was raw.  The guide told me of how they would cut open pregnant women's stomachs tear the baby out chuck it down a 40 foot hole (to where that cave Buddha is) then push the still living woman through.
 
2014-08-02 08:30:08 AM  
You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.
 
2014-08-02 08:35:12 AM  
And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER
 
2014-08-02 08:36:31 AM  
Their leader, Pol Pot, believed that the best lifestyle for individuals and for the national as a while was a simple agrarian one, free of religion or education.
 
2014-08-02 08:39:51 AM  
When Cambodian communists rebelled in the eastern zone in May 1978 Pol Pot's armies could not crush them quickly. On May 10 his radio broadcast a call not only to 'exterminate the 50 million Vietnamese' but also to 'purify the masses of the people' of Cambodia. Of 1.5 million easterners, branded as 'Khmer bodies with Vietnamese minds', at least 100,000 were exterminated in six months.

"Yes. You understand exactly. You and I, Mollari, we will turn Centauri Prime into an inauguration pyre to commemorate my ascension into godhood. The fire of our world will light my way. Yes! You see it, don't you? If I become a god, how will our world survive without me? I cannot just abandon it. That would be cruel! And anyone who followed me would obviously be inferior. Best to put them out of their misery. I will take it all with me in spirit. Don't send the ships. Let it burn, Mollari! Let it all end in fire!"
 
2014-08-02 08:47:10 AM  

Kevin72: I've been to Cambodia twice, and seen exhibits, including the Killing Fields. But I didn't know about the caves.

I remember when I read the news in 1978, it was like "You will never believe what happened in Cambodia in the last 3 years while they didn't allow any reporters in". Then proceeded to tell a story just like the holocaust, but instead of Jews being evacuated from cities and ghettos by cattle cars to the concentration camps, it was ALL of Phnom Penh evacuated by walking. And the first reports of murders of anyone involved with education, of having any education, of speaking any foreign language, of wearing glasses, etc.

Unlike the holocaust, it was an auto-genocide, with a quarter of the population slaughtered.


So you went on holiday in Cambodia - twice?

It's not the last place in the world I'd visit, but it's pretty far down my list of places I want to see.

In the past year, I've seen a documentary about stuff that happened under Pol Pot.  Some of the people who did the killings were still walking around that country free as birds.  I'm not sure I'd have the stomach to watch the Killing Fields.
 
2014-08-02 08:52:45 AM  
It is quite astounding that only a few people have heard of this regime's atrocious legacy

GTFO.
 
2014-08-02 09:00:54 AM  

blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.


Always? No, just mostly. Ans the killing fields are more the fault of Rousseau than atheism, as far as philosophies go.
 
2014-08-02 09:01:10 AM  
There's nothing wrong with the "Killing Caves". They just have a bad name, that's all. Everyone would love them if they had a cute name like "Elf Caves".
 
2014-08-02 09:04:18 AM  

blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.


I came myself to stir the pot in just this way, with a dash of blaming America as well.
 
ecl
2014-08-02 09:18:30 AM  

blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.



Cry harrrrrrrrrrrrd.
 
2014-08-02 09:20:28 AM  
If you're not willing to travel to Cambodia, but would like to bone up on the subject of skulls and bones, you can take a trip through Europe to the churches constructed mostly of bones.
 
2014-08-02 09:21:21 AM  
This blog reads like it was written by a 12-year-old.
 
2014-08-02 09:24:04 AM  
The streets got so much soul.
 
2014-08-02 09:25:47 AM  
Does it still smell like napalm in the morning?
 
2014-08-02 09:54:16 AM  
When on Earth?  More like Why on Earth

I'm not one for sitting on a beach doing nothing on a vacation, I like to explore.  But this just sounds terrible.
 
2014-08-02 09:57:54 AM  

gfid: Kevin72: I've been to Cambodia twice, and seen exhibits, including the Killing Fields. But I didn't know about the caves.

I remember when I read the news in 1978, it was like "You will never believe what happened in Cambodia in the last 3 years while they didn't allow any reporters in". Then proceeded to tell a story just like the holocaust, but instead of Jews being evacuated from cities and ghettos by cattle cars to the concentration camps, it was ALL of Phnom Penh evacuated by walking. And the first reports of murders of anyone involved with education, of having any education, of speaking any foreign language, of wearing glasses, etc.

Unlike the holocaust, it was an auto-genocide, with a quarter of the population slaughtered.

So you went on holiday in Cambodia - twice?

It's not the last place in the world I'd visit, but it's pretty far down my list of places I want to see.

In the past year, I've seen a documentary about stuff that happened under Pol Pot.  Some of the people who did the killings were still walking around that country free as birds.  I'm not sure I'd have the stomach to watch the Killing Fields.


Take it in gradual doses in a "logical" progession via an excellent book called "First they killed my father" I don't know the authoress. She was 5,6 when living through it and recounts what it took to survive.

Both trips to Cambodia combined with trip to 'Nam.
 
2014-08-02 10:01:16 AM  

SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER


Are we still talking about Cambodia?
 
2014-08-02 10:03:55 AM  

blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.


Perhaps it was the influence of Cambodian Tea Party. Or the fear of brown people AKA Moooslims.
I am told this is the cause of 99.99% of all historical conflicts and global warming.
 
2014-08-02 10:06:38 AM  
Outside if Siem Reap (Angkor Wat). Cambodia is not much more than a dirty hole with one of the worst deforestations (70%-3% jungle coverage) in the last 30 years or so.  Muh of the tourism industry only has the nightmarish temples to sell as destinations.  Same in Vietnam,  the biggest tourist thing in Ha Tien I saw today was a mountain cave where thousands of VietnCong were killed by bombs and napalm...I was spat towards and yelled at by the Vietnamese for visiting.
 
2014-08-02 10:15:22 AM  
I have a friend who escaped that as a kid.

Those farkers were more evil than the Nazis.
 
2014-08-02 10:15:32 AM  

Resident Muslim: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

Are we still talking about Cambodia?


Henry Kissinger ordered the "secret bombings" in Cambodia that destroyed their economy and the Cambodian Government collapsed under the pressure. The Khmer Rouge were there to fill the power vacuum that resulted, and their entire program was based on ridding Cambodia of everything that could be remotely construed as being western influenced. That meant anyone who could read or write, anyone that wore eyeglasses, anyone that could speak a foreign language. Doctors, mathematicians, writers, poets, artists, local politicians and administrators etc. Anyone with education.

Literally anyone who had their lives somehow influenced by "western values" was either exterminated or forced to labor on farms with their bare hands. Pol Pot spoke repeatedly of his intention to teach the Cambodian people a harsh lesson and to force them to become a single people under a united central government, even if he had to systematically butcher half the population to do it.

Henry Kissinger and the Nixon Administration did a lot to cause it with their destruction of the primary trading routes Cambodia had with Laos, Thailand and Vietnam, then withdrawing support from the King and then pushing him out when he protested his Nation being bombed when they were not even fighting a war. Sihanouk was forced out by the direct action of the Nixon Administration after he protested to the United Nations about his people being bombed out of their villages by American aircraft.
 
2014-08-02 10:23:33 AM  

Deathfrogg: This blog reads like it was written by a 12-year-old.


How is that different than any other blog?
 
2014-08-02 10:34:04 AM  

blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.


This appears to be the exception that proves the rule, so to speak.
Even though these atrocities were not committed in the name of atheism unlike the many, many religious genocides.
 
2014-08-02 10:36:28 AM  
The Khmer delved too greedily and too deep.
 
2014-08-02 10:36:44 AM  

Deathfrogg: Resident Muslim: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

Are we still talking about Cambodia?

Henry Kissinger ordered the "secret bombings" in Cambodia that destroyed their economy and the Cambodian Government collapsed under the pressure. The Khmer Rouge were there to fill the power vacuum that resulted, and their entire program was based on ridding Cambodia of everything that could be remotely construed as being western influenced. That meant anyone who could read or write, anyone that wore eyeglasses, anyone that could speak a foreign language. Doctors, mathematicians, writers, poets, artists, local politicians and administrators etc. Anyone with education.

Literally anyone who had their lives somehow influenced by "western values" was either exterminated or forced to labor on farms with their bare hands. Pol Pot spoke repeatedly of his intention to teach the Cambodian people a harsh lesson and to force them to become a single people under a united central government, even if he had to systematically butcher half the population to do it.

Henry Kissinger and the Nixon Administration did a lot to cause it with their destruction of the primary trading routes Cambodia had with Laos, Thailand and Vietnam, then withdrawing support from the King and then pushing him out when he protested his Nation being bombed when they were not even fighting a war. Sihanouk was forced out by the direct action of the Nixon Administration after he protested to the United Nations about his people being bombed out of their villages by American aircraft.


Yeah, but how is that America's fault. We're exceptional.
 
ecl
2014-08-02 10:50:26 AM  

Archie Goodwin: The Khmer delved too greedily and too deep.


They awoke the Vietnamese...
 
2014-08-02 10:57:18 AM  

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.

Perhaps it was the influence of Cambodian Tea Party. Or the fear of brown people AKA Moooslims.
I am told this is the cause of 99.99% of all historical conflicts and global warming.


You mean people that strongly believe in ancient religions, distrust modern science, fear/hate those that are different than themselves, and believe their views need to be forced on others?
 
2014-08-02 11:15:27 AM  

Deathfrogg: Resident Muslim: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

Are we still talking about Cambodia?

Henry Kissinger ordered the "secret bombings" in Cambodia that destroyed their economy and the Cambodian Government collapsed under the pressure. The Khmer Rouge were there to fill the power vacuum that resulted, and their entire program was based on ridding Cambodia of everything that could be remotely construed as being western influenced. That meant anyone who could read or write, anyone that wore eyeglasses, anyone that could speak a foreign language. Doctors, mathematicians, writers, poets, artists, local politicians and administrators etc. Anyone with education.

Literally anyone who had their lives somehow influenced by "western values" was either exterminated or forced to labor on farms with their bare hands. Pol Pot spoke repeatedly of his intention to teach the Cambodian people a harsh lesson and to force them to become a single people under a united central government, even if he had to systematically butcher half the population to do it.

Henry Kissinger and the Nixon Administration did a lot to cause it with their destruction of the primary trading routes Cambodia had with Laos, Thailand and Vietnam, then withdrawing support from the King and then pushing him out when he protested his Nation being bombed when they were not even fighting a war. Sihanouk was forced out by the direct action of the Nixon Administration after he protested to the United Nations about his people being bombed out of their villages by American aircraft.


It probably didn't help that North Vietnam was arming the Khmer Rouge and then invaded Cambodia and gave them a direct hand.
 
2014-08-02 11:15:36 AM  

UsikFark: The streets got so much soul.


Where you'll do what you're told
 
2014-08-02 11:15:40 AM  

squeeby: .I was spat towards and yelled at by the Vietnamese for visiting.


And I naively thought Vietnam had gotten over it and were friends with us now.  I guess it takes a long time to heal wounds from a war that I don't even fully comprehend why we fought in the first place.  That must have been a little uncomfortable.

To go off on a tangent I stumbled on an old interview with Robert Duvall last night.  He was talking about a deleted scene from Apocalypse Now where Kilgore saves an infant and how he didn't understand why it was deleted.  I can't find the clip now, but somehow I did last night and I had never seen it before despite having The Complete Dossier on DVD.

It's the scene where he orders the bombing of the tree line right before he says his famous "I love the smell of napalm in the morning" line.  A Vietnamese woman with a baby runs up to him and soldiers are trying to hold her back.  Kilgore gets the baby and its mother on a chopper to a hospital.  It's only a few seconds.  Duvall speculates that it was cut because it made Kilgore appear to have a shred of humanity.
 
2014-08-02 11:19:19 AM  
That kind of evil is back with a vengeance

Link is seriously NSFW or children
 
2014-08-02 11:20:56 AM  
CSB:  I've always been amazed at my high school education (graduated in 1999), I realized even then that our history education essentially stopped at WWII.  I learned about the founding fathers many times through different grades, and even the Civil War, but nothing ever got past the Moon Landing, and it rarely made it that far no matter how many times I had to rehear the old stuff.

My World History (still high school) class taught me again, about the Greeks, Romans, and Ancient Egyptians, not Asia, or the Middle east once Islam came in, or even the Dark Ages.

In college, I (as a political science major) would've gladly taken on a class about the U.S.'s involvement in Vietnam, and South East Asia in general, but I couldn't find one at either the small liberal arts school I started in or the large state university I went to later.  I was able to take a class on the ideology/philosophy of neo-conservatives, but it was entirely focused on post Reagan ideas (roughly 2002-4).

I'm rambling (and kinda not sober) now, but I remember being taught in the classroom, at least a little, about Teddy Roosevelt's rise/fall, the horrid trench warfare and stagnation of WWI, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Grapes of Wrath.  But otherwise my education barely mentioned the 20th century, and especially not the U.S. failures.

It was mostly "Hey we won WWII, all us, USA, USA," stuff growing up.  I've had to learn from pieces like this (and movies) how f-ing terrible we were in Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia/Korea/Iraq/Afghanistan to try to figure out the official narrative vs the reality.

Point is, and again sorry for rambling, S.Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, were just not taught to anyone and/or the classes were so small in college I couldn't sign up for them.  As a society we are trying to forget, I hate that.
 
2014-08-02 11:37:29 AM  
"Henry Kissinger"   Why is that evil littl;e Gnome still alive.  Fark him!

"Prodigal Sigh" So very much what you wrote.
 
2014-08-02 11:42:25 AM  

gfid: I can't find the clip now


Well, I found a really shiatty quality clip of it.   http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/859285/

Skip to 13:20.  Right after Kilgore says "Bomb it to the stone age, son".


ProdigalSigh: I've always been amazed at my high school education (graduated in 1999), I realized even then that our history education essentially stopped at WWII.


I'm a bit older than you, but the history classes I took in school basically ended around WWII as well.  They might have mentioned the Korean War, but I think they were still trying to figure out how to explain Vietnam.

I remember a line from a sitcom from the '70s or maybe early '80s.  "If it weren't for M*A*S*H I wouldn't even know about the Korean War."
 
2014-08-02 11:51:14 AM  

ProdigalSigh: CSB:  I've always been amazed at my high school education (graduated in 1999), I realized even then that our history education essentially stopped at WWII.  I learned about the founding fathers many times through different grades, and even the Civil War, but nothing ever got past the Moon Landing, and it rarely made it that far no matter how many times I had to rehear the old stuff.

My World History (still high school) class taught me again, about the Greeks, Romans, and Ancient Egyptians, not Asia, or the Middle east once Islam came in, or even the Dark Ages.

In college, I (as a political science major) would've gladly taken on a class about the U.S.'s involvement in Vietnam, and South East Asia in general, but I couldn't find one at either the small liberal arts school I started in or the large state university I went to later.  I was able to take a class on the ideology/philosophy of neo-conservatives, but it was entirely focused on post Reagan ideas (roughly 2002-4).

I'm rambling (and kinda not sober) now, but I remember being taught in the classroom, at least a little, about Teddy Roosevelt's rise/fall, the horrid trench warfare and stagnation of WWI, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Grapes of Wrath.  But otherwise my education barely mentioned the 20th century, and especially not the U.S. failures.

It was mostly "Hey we won WWII, all us, USA, USA," stuff growing up.  I've had to learn from pieces like this (and movies) how f-ing terrible we were in Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia/Korea/Iraq/Afghanistan to try to figure out the official narrative vs the reality.

Point is, and again sorry for rambling, S.Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, were just not taught to anyone and/or the classes were so small in college I couldn't sign up for them.  As a society we are trying to forget, I hate that.


You can find an audio lecture "Utopia and Terror in the 20th Century". It covers all major 20th century atrocities. I believe it is produced by the Teaching Company.
 
2014-08-02 12:03:51 PM  
Cambodia is a great place to travel. Beaches, jungles and idyllic towns along the Mekong.
 
2014-08-02 12:52:58 PM  

ProdigalSigh: CSB:  I've always been amazed at my high school education (graduated in 1999), I realized even then that our history education essentially stopped at WWII.  I learned about the founding fathers many times through different grades, and even the Civil War, but nothing ever got past the Moon Landing, and it rarely made it that far no matter how many times I had to rehear the old stuff.

My World History (still high school) class taught me again, about the Greeks, Romans, and Ancient Egyptians, not Asia, or the Middle east once Islam came in, or even the Dark Ages.

In college, I (as a political science major) would've gladly taken on a class about the U.S.'s involvement in Vietnam, and South East Asia in general, but I couldn't find one at either the small liberal arts school I started in or the large state university I went to later.  I was able to take a class on the ideology/philosophy of neo-conservatives, but it was entirely focused on post Reagan ideas (roughly 2002-4).

I'm rambling (and kinda not sober) now, but I remember being taught in the classroom, at least a little, about Teddy Roosevelt's rise/fall, the horrid trench warfare and stagnation of WWI, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Grapes of Wrath.  But otherwise my education barely mentioned the 20th century, and especially not the U.S. failures.

It was mostly "Hey we won WWII, all us, USA, USA," stuff growing up.  I've had to learn from pieces like this (and movies) how f-ing terrible we were in Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia/Korea/Iraq/Afghanistan to try to figure out the official narrative vs the reality.

Point is, and again sorry for rambling, S.Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, were just not taught to anyone and/or the classes were so small in college I couldn't sign up for them.  As a society we are trying to forget, I hate that.


We covered a lot of 20th century US history in my high school (I graduated in '02). There was even a debate assignment on whether or not the Vietnam War was a good idea. I'm pretty sure we at least touched on Cambodia.

Some schools teach this stuff (and I didn't go to some hippie school either-this was a stereotypical suburban American high school).
 
2014-08-02 01:05:18 PM  
I've been to the tower of skulls and S21, and even got a talk from one of the two survivors of S21.

Those were horrific enough but the worst part was my local guide speaking about it... Young girl, maybe 30 at most. There's stuff you can talk about in public with tourists, (it's still a military junta) and then there's stuff you talk about on the bus. Everyone there has family that died there.

Even after seeing all the torture, the pictures and exhibits of violence in all the way a museum can describe the worst of us, even talking to a guy who had survived it. the absolute worst thing was seeing this poor girl who still couldn't figure out why it all happens. She had probably described it many times, but it was still tearing her up. I have never seen someone else that torn up.
 
2014-08-02 01:29:05 PM  
blacksho89: You must be mistaken. I am assured that war and mass murder is always the fault of organized religion. Perhaps you should fact-check your sources.

Oh for fark's sake...


Believing in one thing strongly allows all sorts of atrocities. States or Gods or whatever. Including Pol Pot's Bull hockey.

What is the common factor in all of this? Not believing things? Disbelief?
 
2014-08-02 01:39:00 PM  
Constantly amazed by the number of people who don't think faith is required to motivate a few million people to massacre a few million others.

Might not be your god, but it's the same behavior.
 
2014-08-02 01:52:56 PM  

Deathfrogg: Resident Muslim: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

Are we still talking about Cambodia?

Henry Kissinger ordered the "secret bombings" in Cambodia that destroyed their economy and the Cambodian Government collapsed under the pressure. The Khmer Rouge were there to fill the power vacuum that resulted, and their entire program was based on ridding Cambodia of everything that could be remotely construed as being western influenced. That meant anyone who could read or write, anyone that wore eyeglasses, anyone that could speak a foreign language. Doctors, mathematicians, writers, poets, artists, local politicians and administrators etc. Anyone with education.

Literally anyone who had their lives somehow influenced by "western values" was either exterminated or forced to labor on farms with their bare hands. Pol Pot spoke repeatedly of his intention to teach the Cambodian people a harsh lesson and to force them to become a single  cpeople under a united central government, even if he had to systematically butcher half the population to do it.

Henry Kissinger and the Nixon Administration did a lot to cause it with their destruction of the primary trading routes Cambodia had with Laos, Thailand and Vietnam, then withdrawing support from the King and then pushing him out when he protested his Nation being bombed when they were not even fighting a war. Sihanouk was forced out by the direct action of the Nixon Administration after he protested to the United Nations about his people being bombed out of their villages by American aircraft.


Kissinger wasn't in the military chain of command and didn't order any bombings.  This isn't to say, however, that he didn't convince Nixon to bomb Cambodia.
 
2014-08-02 01:53:01 PM  

optional: There was even a debate assignment on whether or not the Vietnam War was a good idea.


Was the debate about US involvement or over whether or not North Vietnam should have started the war?
 
2014-08-02 02:57:23 PM  

Deathfrogg: Resident Muslim: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

Are we still talking about Cambodia?

Henry Kissinger ordered the "secret bombings" in Cambodia that destroyed their economy and the Cambodian Government collapsed under the pressure. The Khmer Rouge were there to fill the power vacuum that resulted, and their entire program was based on ridding Cambodia of everything that could be remotely construed as being western influenced. That meant anyone who could read or write, anyone that wore eyeglasses, anyone that could speak a foreign language. Doctors, mathematicians, writers, poets, artists, local politicians and administrators etc. Anyone with education.

Literally anyone who had their lives somehow influenced by "western values" was either exterminated or forced to labor on farms with their bare hands. Pol Pot spoke repeatedly of his intention to teach the Cambodian people a harsh lesson and to force them to become a single people under a united central government, even if he had to systematically butcher half the population to do it.

Henry Kissinger and the Nixon Administration did a lot to cause it with their destruction of the primary trading routes Cambodia had with Laos, Thailand and Vietnam, then withdrawing support from the King and then pushing him out when he protested his Nation being bombed when they were not even fighting a war. Sihanouk was forced out by the direct action of the Nixon Administration after he protested to the United Nations about his people being bombed out of their villages by American aircraft.


Therefore, RM, I would answer your query by stating that YES we are still talking about Cambodia. Thank you to Deathfrogg for saving me the trouble of rooting up the obscene history.

Spent a pleasant evening in Phnom Penh while passing through in 1968. Purchased some twigs with shrivelled leaves from an old village woman squatting on the sidewalk. Smoked it up in the park, relaxing on a bench, as Dean Bishop, sitting stoned in the semi-darkness beside me, was the recipient of a quiet blowjob from another gentlemen.

Interesting times; sad era afterwards.
 
2014-08-02 03:47:57 PM  

leevis: optional: There was even a debate assignment on whether or not the Vietnam War was a good idea.

Was the debate about US involvement or over whether or not North Vietnam should have started the war?


It was over US involvement.
 
2014-08-02 04:34:44 PM  

SpeedyBB: Therefore, RM, I would answer your query by stating that YES we are still talking about Cambodia. Thank you to Deathfrogg for saving me the trouble of rooting up the obscene history.

Spent a pleasant evening in Phnom Penh while passing through in 1968. Purchased ...


And that "obscene history" will continue to be repeated, for as long as you refuse to learn from it.
 
2014-08-02 04:56:40 PM  

SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER


The day the Peace Prize died.
 
2014-08-02 07:18:09 PM  

Sliding Carp: SpeedyBB: And just in case, for those innocent readers who may have ignored history, or for those who may neglect to remember, on behalf of all the dead, we wish to send a big

THANK YOU HENRY KISSINGER

The day the Peace Prize died.


No, the day it died was when Gandhi was blackballed from it.
 
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