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(TreeHugger)   Before the Buy Fair Trade Coffee movement, enjoying a morning cup of coffee wasn't so complicated   (treehugger.com) divider line 70
    More: Obvious, cargo bikes, tree huggers, Rainforest Alliance, sustainable agriculture, San, gender inequality, labour standards, fertile soil  
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2577 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Aug 2014 at 10:59 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



70 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-08-02 09:56:35 AM  
That's funny, Frank never has a conscience at home.
 
2014-08-02 11:03:18 AM  
Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.
 
2014-08-02 11:03:41 AM  
It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.
 
2014-08-02 11:04:16 AM  
It still isn't complicated. Most of the really good coffee these days is fair trade anyway.
If you don't care about quality for your caffeine fix, it's even less complicated.
 
2014-08-02 11:05:18 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


Now we know where Pocket Ninja really lives... or says he does.
 
2014-08-02 11:05:33 AM  
That article made me want to waterboard a hippy.
 
2014-08-02 11:06:15 AM  
I don't care
 
2014-08-02 11:13:04 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


You beat me to it, parts of it read like an Onion article.
 
2014-08-02 11:14:45 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


I think he's trying to become the Hipster King. But he'll only wear the crown ironically, of course.
 
2014-08-02 11:15:46 AM  
I like my coffee and my diamonds how I like my steak: bloody
 
2014-08-02 11:16:29 AM  
The cost of really good coffee is not a big deal when you calculate it by the cup; even the very best bean will cost less than a crappy Keurig or Nespresso pod. it's one area where you can afford to go a bit wild.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike. It feels good and tastes better. I am sure there are similar operations in other cities; leave a note in comments if you know of any.


How is that an example of 'how far you can go' when you didn't say how much you get or how much it costs?

Oh, and...

media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com

You can still brew your fair trade stuff in the Keurig.
 
2014-08-02 11:17:16 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


Yeah, I was with the article until I read that.  Then I thought "fark, this guy sounds like a douchebag."
 
2014-08-02 11:19:15 AM  

El_Swino: JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.

Yeah, I was with the article until I read that.  Then I thought "fark, this guy sounds like a douchebag."


When I saw it was a Treehugger linkk, I thought "fark, subby sounds like a douchebag".
 
2014-08-02 11:20:44 AM  
This quote isn't getting enough love:

I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike. It feels good and tastes better.
 
2014-08-02 11:22:40 AM  
My morning coffee routine is still very easy and quick. A few spoonfuls of Folgers in my French press, some boiling water from the tea kettle, soak for a few minutes, push the plunger and drink.
 
2014-08-02 11:27:38 AM  

rebelyell2006: My morning coffee routine is still very easy and quick. A few spoonfuls of Folgers in my French press, some boiling water from the tea kettle, soak for a few minutes, push the plunger and drink.


I'm torn between my admiration for you using a French press and my disdain for putting Folgers in it.
 
2014-08-02 11:28:55 AM  
CC BY 2.0 My morning shade grown bird friendly organic coffee delivered in mason jars by cargo bike.

stoppedreadingthere.jpg
 
2014-08-02 11:29:31 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


My first thought was "Which one of you farkers that writes shiat like this in the beer snob threads wrote this?"
 
2014-08-02 11:29:42 AM  
I'm in the "don't buy coffee" movement.
 
2014-08-02 11:30:17 AM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


Dear God, why would they do that?  There is absolutely NO WAY that distribution method is more efficient than standard trucks (biodesiel if you must).  The ONLY way this is practical is that they sell so little in Toronto (you know, one of the largest markets in Canada) that they only need the capacity of a Prius.

I googled and an F150 gets 23 mpg and has to have at least double the capacity of a Prius.  So, with Prius' 48 mpg it is at best a tie.  I am of course assuming optimal fuel efficiency, which neither will get under full load, but I'd bet the pickup will get closer to optimal mpg than the prius simply because it's designed for hauling and you could probably get the mileage a little lower with a cover, which is probably good for the coffee anyway.

AngryDragon: That article made me want to waterboard a hippy.


I just like this sentiment.
 
2014-08-02 11:34:30 AM  

MemeSlave: Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.


this.  Free trade is fair trade.
 
2014-08-02 11:34:37 AM  

Fuggin Bizzy: This quote isn't getting enough love:

I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike. It feels good and tastes better.


Yes, but it can only be really sustainable if the coffee is roasted in some kind of solar-powered oven.


Gotta go.
 
2014-08-02 11:36:09 AM  
Blood coffee. Fill it to the rim.
 
2014-08-02 11:40:06 AM  

NewWorldDan: MemeSlave: Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.

this.  Free trade is fair trade.


And you are free to buy it from other producers. Not a single law of supply and demand is being broken.
 
2014-08-02 11:40:15 AM  
My complaint is that there used to be coffee dust (pre-ground) and whole bean.  Now all I can find is coffee dust and little plastic cups of over-priced coffee dust.

Just ordered 10 lbs of beans off of the internet.
 
2014-08-02 11:40:40 AM  

theknuckler_33: The cost of really good coffee is not a big deal when you calculate it by the cup; even the very best bean will cost less than a crappy Keurig or Nespresso pod. it's one area where you can afford to go a bit wild.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike. It feels good and tastes better. I am sure there are similar operations in other cities; leave a note in comments if you know of any.

How is that an example of 'how far you can go' when you didn't say how much you get or how much it costs?

Oh, and...

[media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com image 500x489]

You can still brew your fair trade stuff in the Keurig.


But you still have to use a Keurig. It is an acceptable compromise to use the one at work. Buying one, however, is always a waste of money. It doesn't do anything a regular coffee maker or kettle can't do. what it can do is make one small cup of coffee at a time. No fun if you have a big mug or guests. When I have guests, I fill the coffee maker and can serve coffee much faster than a Keurig can brew it.
 
2014-08-02 11:41:43 AM  
The cheaper the coffee, the lighter the roast, the better it tastes. IMHO the best is a refill of Casey's General Store Classic for $0.69 (plus tax) in my travel mug. Far superior to anything from Starbucks or that filtered-through-a-jockstrap swill from Java House.
 
2014-08-02 11:44:48 AM  

NewWorldDan: MemeSlave: Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.

this.  Free trade is fair trade.


There are some problems with the coffee business.  Mainly the consolidation of the coffee roasters.  I don't think fair trade really addresses this, though.
 
2014-08-02 11:45:42 AM  

Tobin_Lam: theknuckler_33: The cost of really good coffee is not a big deal when you calculate it by the cup; even the very best bean will cost less than a crappy Keurig or Nespresso pod. it's one area where you can afford to go a bit wild.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike. It feels good and tastes better. I am sure there are similar operations in other cities; leave a note in comments if you know of any.

How is that an example of 'how far you can go' when you didn't say how much you get or how much it costs?

Oh, and...

[media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com image 500x489]

You can still brew your fair trade stuff in the Keurig.

But you still have to use a Keurig. It is an acceptable compromise to use the one at work. Buying one, however, is always a waste of money. It doesn't do anything a regular coffee maker or kettle can't do. what it can do is make one small cup of coffee at a time. No fun if you have a big mug or guests. When I have guests, I fill the coffee maker and can serve coffee much faster than a Keurig can brew it.


They're pretty much required for any modern workplace, where most people just want a cup of their own preferred coffee blend.
 
2014-08-02 11:45:47 AM  
As a coffee lover for several decades, I have to say nothing beats 100% Kona. More expensive than any other kind I've had, but worth it. Kona Joe is one of the better ones and they have several varieties and roasts to choose from. If you order it, be sure to get whole bean. It ships from HI so it takes >1 week to get to you, but you won't regret it.
 
2014-08-02 11:46:27 AM  

BafflerMeal: NewWorldDan: MemeSlave: Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.

this.  Free trade is fair trade.

And you are free to buy it from other producers. Not a single law of supply and demand is being broken.


Apparently it's communism if you buy something that isn't advertised on TV.
 
2014-08-02 11:50:09 AM  
I get a hot cuppa joe in the morning, a hippy gets a punch in the snout. Fair trade. I love you Juan Valdez.
 
2014-08-02 11:50:40 AM  

Plant Rights Activist: NewWorldDan: MemeSlave: Failtrade.   It breaks the fundamental law of supply and demand.

this.  Free trade is fair trade.

There are some problems with the coffee business.  Mainly the consolidation of the coffee roasters.  I don't think fair trade really addresses this, though.


Economies of scale - also fine provided there's no coercion on either side.
 
2014-08-02 11:50:51 AM  

rebelyell2006: My morning coffee routine is still very easy and quick. A few spoonfuls of Folgers in my French press, some boiling water from the tea kettle, soak for a few minutes, push the plunger and drink.


The very best way to make coffee, using the worst possible coffee. Nice job.
 
2014-08-02 11:52:20 AM  

Tobin_Lam: But you still have to use a Keurig. It is an acceptable compromise to use the one at work. Buying one, however, is always a waste of money. It doesn't do anything a regular coffee maker or kettle can't do. what it can do is make one small cup of coffee at a time. No fun if you have a big mug or guests. When I have guests, I fill the coffee maker and can serve coffee much faster than a Keurig can brew it.


Yea, it's no good for more than a handful of people, but, at least for me, that's a rarity. It's just me, my wife, and daughter. With a regular automatic drip coffee maker, I never would drink the coffee it is was in the pot for more than about an hour, and since I never wanted to not have enough, I'd always end up making more than I needed. I estimate I wasted a good 10% of the coffee I made in an automatic drip maker. If I want a large mug, I just brew two small cups into it.

My only real beef with the one I have is the rare case where I have more guests than the Keurig can conveniently handle (I have a large percolator coffee maker for that, which actually makes a damned fine cup of coffee) and that I don't have much control over how strong/weak the coffee is. I can make a 'small' cup to get a bit stronger, but its a minor difference, and even the reusable filter thingy only holds so much coffee and you can't pack it in tight or it'll spill all over.
 
2014-08-02 12:07:39 PM  

Plissken: As a coffee lover for several decades, I have to say nothing beats 100% Kona. More expensive than any other kind I've had, but worth it. Kona Joe is one of the better ones and they have several varieties and roasts to choose from. If you order it, be sure to get whole bean. It ships from HI so it takes >1 week to get to you, but you won't regret it.


$69.95 for a pound of coffee? I think not...
 
2014-08-02 12:12:11 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: They're pretty much required for any modern workplace, where most people just want a cup of their own preferred coffee blend.


I am in charge of buying coffee at work.  The CFO demanded that we get a Keurig machine and couldn't understand why I fought her so hard on the issue.  We now have a Keurig and spend over $200 a month on coffee.  That cost used to be in the neighborhood of $20.  It's hard to tell because I'd buy a box of coffee and it would last for months.

She was the ONLY person who complained about the Bunn drip coffee maker with regular and decaf only. Now we have 2 kinds of dark roast, 2 kinds of medium roast, 2 flavors, decaf, Tea, and a light roast.  If we run out of any of it, I get complaints.  People drink way more coffee because it's convenient, but that means employees standing around waiting on coffee to brew and drinking coffee instead of working.  It also means about $1 a cup in cost.  That doesn't sound bad until you compare 8 O'Clock coffee was about $0.10 a cup.
 
2014-08-02 12:13:56 PM  
It's not complicated.

Got one of these years ago at a yard sale for $3 or so.

zibbet-production.s3.amazonaws.com


A stainless steel colander and a stainless steel strainer to pour the roasted beans back and forth in for cooling

A wooden spoon for stirring and blocking errant beans in the popper by laying on top of the open popper.

A small mason jar and plastic lid (left loose for 24 hours then tightened down) full of roasted beans stored in a dark place.

I don't drink a lot of coffee so the half cup of beans I roast at a time lasts a week or so. Plus I can just roast more often and store in a bigger jar but I like to use the roasted coffee up quickly.
 
2014-08-02 12:14:53 PM  
OOps. I forgot the Magic Bullet I had for years with its grinding head and smaller container for grinding the beans.
 
2014-08-02 12:30:04 PM  

JohnHall: It's hard to take the article seriously with this line.

As an example of how far you can go, I get my coffee in returnable mason jars, roasted weekly by Coffeecology in Hamilton, Ontario. It's organic, shade grown, Fair Trade and driven to Toronto in a Prius, and then delivered by Laurie Featherstone on her cargo bike

It sounds like a parody.


You forgot "bird friendly":  My morning shade grown bird friendly organic coffee delivered in mason jars by cargo bike.
 
2014-08-02 12:45:33 PM  

Billy Bathsalt: My complaint is that there used to be coffee dust (pre-ground) and whole bean.  Now all I can find is coffee dust and little plastic cups of over-priced coffee dust.

Just ordered 10 lbs of beans off of the internet.


You need to go to Costco.
 
2014-08-02 12:51:06 PM  

mike_d85: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: They're pretty much required for any modern workplace, where most people just want a cup of their own preferred coffee blend.

I am in charge of buying coffee at work.  The CFO demanded that we get a Keurig machine and couldn't understand why I fought her so hard on the issue.  We now have a Keurig and spend over $200 a month on coffee.  That cost used to be in the neighborhood of $20.  It's hard to tell because I'd buy a box of coffee and it would last for months.

She was the ONLY person who complained about the Bunn drip coffee maker with regular and decaf only. Now we have 2 kinds of dark roast, 2 kinds of medium roast, 2 flavors, decaf, Tea, and a light roast.  If we run out of any of it, I get complaints.  People drink way more coffee because it's convenient, but that means employees standing around waiting on coffee to brew and drinking coffee instead of working.  It also means about $1 a cup in cost.  That doesn't sound bad until you compare 8 O'Clock coffee was about $0.10 a cup.


My friends and family keep wanting me to like the Keurig so much. All I see is a far-too-small amount of end product in trade for absurdly increased trash production, all at a prohibitive cost increase.
"But there's so many different flavors! You can even make cider!"

Just leave me to my drip-brewed Cafe Du Monde or French Market, drunk a quart mason jar at a time. A tablespoon of stevia, a shot of 2% milk.
 
2014-08-02 12:56:42 PM  
I think I need to know the make and model of Laurie Featherstone's cargo bike before I make an informed decision.
 
2014-08-02 01:03:29 PM  

fight club: Billy Bathsalt: My complaint is that there used to be coffee dust (pre-ground) and whole bean.  Now all I can find is coffee dust and little plastic cups of over-priced coffee dust.

Just ordered 10 lbs of beans off of the internet.

You need to go to Costco.


You're right, they love me there!
 
2014-08-02 01:10:59 PM  
Despite being Colombian and my family at one point in time had huge coffee farms, I am not a big coffee fan.

When I do drink it I prefer darker roasts, Community being my favorite.

However, in Colombia everyone tends to drink Sello Rojo and it is even popular with the expats.  I have coffee snob pals in the states who I give it to when I come back from trips and they all love it.

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2014-08-02 01:42:21 PM  

PolyHatSnake: mike_d85: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: They're pretty much required for any modern workplace, where most people just want a cup of their own preferred coffee blend.

I am in charge of buying coffee at work.  The CFO demanded that we get a Keurig machine and couldn't understand why I fought her so hard on the issue.  We now have a Keurig and spend over $200 a month on coffee.  That cost used to be in the neighborhood of $20.  It's hard to tell because I'd buy a box of coffee and it would last for months.

She was the ONLY person who complained about the Bunn drip coffee maker with regular and decaf only. Now we have 2 kinds of dark roast, 2 kinds of medium roast, 2 flavors, decaf, Tea, and a light roast.  If we run out of any of it, I get complaints.  People drink way more coffee because it's convenient, but that means employees standing around waiting on coffee to brew and drinking coffee instead of working.  It also means about $1 a cup in cost.  That doesn't sound bad until you compare 8 O'Clock coffee was about $0.10 a cup.

My friends and family keep wanting me to like the Keurig so much. All I see is a far-too-small amount of end product in trade for absurdly increased trash production, all at a prohibitive cost increase.
"But there's so many different flavors! You can even make cider!"

Just leave me to my drip-brewed Cafe Du Monde or French Market, drunk a quart mason jar at a time. A tablespoon of stevia, a shot of 2% milk.


I had the same opinion as you about Keurig.  Then my office got one.  I caved a month later and bought one for my home.  It has everything against it except convenience and consistency.  I can also put a pint glass of ice into it and make ice coffee in 45 seconds.
 
2014-08-02 01:43:33 PM  
Wow. I've never really known what fair trade coffee really was until I read this article. I assumed it was along the lines of blood diamonds, and the fair trade label just meant the coffee wasn't produced, at a local level, by slave labor and such. Now that I know what it really is, I'm going to go with what I personally like again, instead of letting my conscience make the choice. Capitalism is back, baby! Screw fair trade.
 
2014-08-02 01:55:10 PM  

theflatline: When I do drink it I prefer darker roasts, Community being my favorite.



img.fark.net

Mmmm, Community.


/ still a pound . . . my ass!
 
2014-08-02 02:11:53 PM  

Billy Bathsalt: My complaint is that there used to be coffee dust (pre-ground) and whole bean.  Now all I can find is coffee dust and little plastic cups of over-priced coffee dust.

Just ordered 10 lbs of beans off of the internet.


Yeah, all the grocery stores where I shop have changed their coffee section to devote over 1/3 of the shelf space to K-cups. What they eliminated to make space was much of their whole bean inventory - including some damn good medium roasts that were among my favorites.

Although it's easy enough to walk a few more blocks to the coffee shop that sells them, they were cheaper at the grocery store and came in those 12oz bags that I prefer because it takes me to long to go through a whole pound and it gets a bit stale.
 
2014-08-02 02:19:51 PM  

maxx2112: theflatline: When I do drink it I prefer darker roasts, Community being my favorite.


[img.fark.net image 500x500]

Mmmm, Community.


/ still a pound . . . my ass!


I have the strangest heritage of being a Colombian coon ass.

When I was a kid and I use to go to the grocery store with my grandfather, Community had grinders in the store and you would grab a sack of beans and they would grind it fresh for you.

Fast forward to my teens and me partying too much in New Orleans and I was shipped off to Colombia during Escobar times I had to work on my Colombian familys coffee farm, and learn all about it.  Community is pretty near a roast as they drink it there.
 
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