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(KSBW Monterey)   California restaurant: Your kids are welcome if they don't use a stroller, high chair or booster seat. And they keep their mouth shut   (ksbw.com) divider line 134
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868 clicks; posted to Business » on 31 Jul 2014 at 7:42 AM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-31 06:22:59 AM  
Ban them from the Vegas strip as well.
 
2014-07-31 07:46:59 AM  
I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?
 
2014-07-31 08:00:43 AM  
Free association. Fine by me.

/parent
//no, I will not bring my 8-month-old to a restaurant, neither of us would have a good time
 
2014-07-31 08:02:31 AM  

47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?


To keep out the kids. I bet there's some law preventing outright discrimination.

That said, as a parent of two young children, I am totally fine with this. Yeah, my kids know how to behave on a restaurant and I'll happily remove them if they're being loud but if a restaurant wants to be exclusively an adult establishment, by all means, go ahead. There's always a family friendly place we can go to.
 
2014-07-31 08:05:00 AM  

47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?


I suppose because kids that need such things dont know any better and cant be reasoned with if they start to cause a disturbance.

Kids should learn restaurant behavior at Dennys and other such places where expectations for the dining experience are low to begin with.
 
2014-07-31 08:06:39 AM  

TomD9938: 47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?

I suppose because kids that need such things dont know any better and cant be reasoned with if they start to cause a disturbance.

Kids should learn restaurant behavior at Dennys and other such places where expectations for the dining experience are low to begin with.


Exactly. There are plenty of cheap places out there where a young child would be happily welcomed. And the kid would probably have a better time and more enjoyable meal anyway.
 
2014-07-31 08:17:47 AM  
What if you're an adult that needs a booster seat? Why discriminate against the diminutive?
 
2014-07-31 08:19:58 AM  
They should extend this to include larger kids who can't sit through a meal without watching loud videos on a tablet through the whole thing as well.
 
2014-07-31 08:20:17 AM  
Do they prohibit wheelchairs as well? Appears that their beef with strollers is that "they take up too much space."

If I were enterprising and still lived in the Bay Area, I would rent wheelchairs to people with kids who wanted to eat here. I highly doubt that the place is going to kick out any child that's in a wheelchair.
 
2014-07-31 08:23:31 AM  

The restaurant's owner, Chris Shake, said if customers don't like the rules, they can go somewhere else for dinner.

Shake added that he isn't backing down.

"If a place has the rules, that's what the rules are," Shake said. "You go in and abide by the rules or you find a place more suitable for you."


I would happily buy Mr. Shake a beverage for these statements alone.
 
2014-07-31 08:31:43 AM  

gadian: What if you're an adult that needs a booster seat? Why discriminate against the diminutive?


Because it's easier to pick on people who aren't your own size? Duh...

DaCheeze.EXE: They should extend this to include larger kids who can't sit through a meal without watching loud videos on a tablet through the whole thing as well.


Or play noisy games on mom's phone with the volume turned all the way up the whole time because apparently that keeps them "occupied" so they don't act up and bother other diners... yea. Right.

It really is amazing that so many parents are so completely clueless as to just how much of their child's annoying behavior they've managed to just simply filter out. I have no doubt that many parents honestly believe their kid isn't really that bad, but I assure those parents, they are not only "that bad" but MUCH WORSE. Kids are dumb and annoying, that's why they need parents. There aren't really very many exceptions to that rule because it's how human development works. You didn't hit the behavioral jackpot, you've just learned how to screen out your stupid kids.
 
2014-07-31 08:38:18 AM  
"I think it's ridiculous," tourist Teresa Colombani said. "I think kids need to know how to behave in restaurants, and if you, don't take them to them, they don't know how to behave and they shouldn't be kept hidden away, so I think it's ridiculous. Kids should be allowed in restaurants."

Excessive punctuation detected.
 
2014-07-31 08:40:04 AM  
I can't believe the amount of people that willingly turn away money.   All it's going to take is a law that says you can't discriminate against children unless it's an establishment that mainly sales alcohol and all the pretentious chefs can go stick it.
 
2014-07-31 08:41:11 AM  

YixilTesiphon: Free association. Fine by me.

/parent
//no, I will not bring my 8-month-old to a restaurant, neither of us would have a good time


Some of us are in the position of "babysitter, OR restaurant." Need less to say, we very, very very, VERY RARELY go out. We both know our marriage sucks solely because of finances and until I finish my (second) stupid degree and compete with the other 13 million STEMS for the 6.3 million STEM jobs, there's nothing we can do about it.
 
2014-07-31 08:54:06 AM  
Hero tag have reservations somewhere else?
 
2014-07-31 09:03:27 AM  

TNel: I can't believe the amount of people that willingly turn away money.


Do you honestly believe there isn't a market for food establishments that are free of small children? My wife and I frequent a number of establishments like that - not by mandate, simply because people don't take kids to them - and they're all doing very well. In fact, the only place I can think of that we eat which regularly has children in it is the local diner.
 
2014-07-31 09:06:32 AM  

TNel: I can't believe the amount of people that willingly turn away money.   All it's going to take is a law that says you can't discriminate against children unless it's an establishment that mainly sales alcohol and all the pretentious chefs can go stick it.


What if they make more money from people that don't like loud children? Then this sign would boost business, wouldn't it?
 
2014-07-31 09:07:12 AM  
Shake said that Shake said.

/Wait, Shake said what?
//All this shaking is going to give me Parkinson's
 
2014-07-31 09:09:44 AM  
As someone soon to have 3 kids under 4, I'm fine with this.
 
2014-07-31 09:15:19 AM  

meanmutton: That said, as a parent of two young children, I am totally fine with this. Yeah, my kids know how to behave on a restaurant and I'll happily remove them if they're being loud but if a restaurant wants to be exclusively an adult establishment, by all means, go ahead. There's always a family friendly place we can go to.


We were in an English style pub on Sunday and when we went in, the waiter said something about sitting us "away from the noise." We didn't realize immediately (or would have gone elsewhere) that some idiots had a brood with them.  A loud, crying, unhappy brood. It was really just two of them as far as we could tell, but the place was not Chuck E. Cheese and you could tell the waitstaff/head of house was pissed off because it's a new place and they don't want a bad reputation as a family-friendly restaurant (which it obviously isn't).  And the truth is? I can't see myself going back there. The staff tried, but I associate the place with two howling brats, crappy parenting who refused to leave, and an unpleasant experience.  That's unfortunate for them, since we all know what happens to any establishment who puts all their customers before the self-entitled parents who showed up.

The pendulum can only swing so far; the past few years of "kids can and should be anywhere the parents want because god forbid they change their life in any way after having kids" is going to, albeit slowly, reversed.  We're going to Yonkers, NY to Alamo Drafthouse for movies now after learning nobody under 18 is allowed except at kids shows. Score.
 
2014-07-31 09:17:14 AM  

skozlaw: TNel: I can't believe the amount of people that willingly turn away money.

Do you honestly believe there isn't a market for food establishments that are free of small children? My wife and I frequent a number of establishments like that - not by mandate, simply because people don't take kids to them - and they're all doing very well. In fact, the only place I can think of that we eat which regularly has children in it is the local diner.


I've never seen a place say no kids other than a bar or club.  Is the only place the diner because you are looking for them?  They are probably there but you don't notice them unless you go out of your way to spot them.  It's like getting a new car and then all of a sudden you see that there are a lot of the same model as yours because you are then looking for it.

No I can't see there being much of a market for a "No kids" food establishment.  Maybe if you are looking for fine dining but most people don't daily go to a fine dining place.

bangmaid: What if they make more money from people that don't like loud children? Then this sign would boost business, wouldn't it?


You really think people in a touristy area that don't have kids are going to flock to it now?  Plus they didn't say no kids they just said if they make noise they will be asked to leave.  The stroller to wheelchair comparison is interesting and might be a fun one for a person with deep pockets.  It is a necessary item for a person that can not walk on their own just like wheelchairs.
 
hej
2014-07-31 09:23:49 AM  

47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?


Because those kids are almost certain to be loud, as well as making a mess that the restaurant staff probably doesn't want to clean up.
 
2014-07-31 09:31:56 AM  

47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?


Circumventing age discrimination issues. Younger children - babies, toddlers, etc - require those items. And I'm all for it. So damned tired of watching uncaring, entitled parents bring their squalling crotchfruit into places clearly not meant for crotchfruit, and then pulling provocative shiat when asked to leave, either by other patrons or the establishment itself.
 
2014-07-31 09:34:55 AM  
As somebody who took his older parents and others to a nice restaurant last night and had it wrecked by a large party with 4+ loud, unrestrained toddlers I am not CSB'n.

What do you do?  Nowhere to move - tables all full.   Debating whether to send note to restaurant noting this but what does that accomplish?
 
hej
2014-07-31 09:36:20 AM  

one of Ripley's Bad Guys: As somebody who took his older parents and others to a nice restaurant last night and had it wrecked by a large party with 4+ loud, unrestrained toddlers I am not CSB'n.

What do you do?  Nowhere to move - tables all full.   Debating whether to send note to restaurant noting this but what does that accomplish?


Kick over the table and punch the parents in the face.
 
2014-07-31 09:45:01 AM  

hej: one of Ripley's Bad Guys: As somebody who took his older parents and others to a nice restaurant last night and had it wrecked by a large party with 4+ loud, unrestrained toddlers I am not CSB'n.

What do you do?  Nowhere to move - tables all full.   Debating whether to send note to restaurant noting this but what does that accomplish?

Kick over the table and punch the parents in the face.


Too many legal issues.

I view this as at least half the restaurant's fault - a quiet word from a manager may have done wonders.
 
2014-07-31 09:46:22 AM  

TNel: I've never seen a place say no kids other than a bar or club. Is the only place the diner because you are looking for them? They are probably there but you don't notice them unless you go out of your way to spot them. It's like getting a new car and then all of a sudden you see that there are a lot of the same model as yours because you are then looking for it.


Nope. There's two places we regularly visit that have kids more than "infrequently": the diner, for obvious reasons, and a little bar that has really great wings, but even that place doesn't have too many most of the time because it's a little on the seedy side. Or at least looks that way, it's not really as bad as it appears from the outside.

The steak house around the corner from us generally only has kids when they're in a large group. There's a place we go that's a restaurant attached to a golf course that almost never has kids in it. The sports bar usually has maybe two or three tables with kids in the "lounge" area, but that's out of dozens of tables.

Pretty much the only time we see them at anything more than one table here or there is if we go to a chain restaurant, which we don't do very often since our town has a lot of good local joints, or go to the diner. We don't really do 'fine dining', either, it's mostly just local steak joints or pub type places.

There are lots of people who don't want to have to deal with children when they go out. People without kids (the group I fall into), people with kids they left with sitters, people who had kids that moved out.

It's not a deal breaker for me either way, but all other things being the same, if I can choose a location that's unlikely to have kids - or outright bans them - I'm going with the "no kids" joint every time. And obviously I'm actively avoiding anything that kids are going to frequent, since I have none of my own.

There's plenty of places that parents can take their kids to eat. There's nothing wrong with having places where people can be free of kids too and to think that people wouldn't want to actively seek out a quiet, adult setting to eat is a bit silly.
 
jvl
2014-07-31 09:50:07 AM  

Englebert Slaptyback: I would happily buy Mr. Shake a beverage for these statements alone.


Normally I would agree. But Mr. Shake has a business on a tourist wharf visited almost entirely by families. It's a stupid location for a non-family friendly restaurant. Given that the tourists have to walk a fair ways to get there, banning strollers is also pretty stupid. The only thing I agree with is the notion that parents should control their kids volume.

I don't have young ones anymore. Next time I'm at the wharf (and I like that wharf), there is no way in hell I'm eating at his restaurant.
 
2014-07-31 09:51:04 AM  

one of Ripley's Bad Guys: What do you do? Nowhere to move - tables all full.


You should have complained to the management. It's their job to manage the experience for ALL their patrons, not just the stupid ones that can't control their children. I got comped appetizers and drinks once when I complained about the idiots behind us who were just ignoring a baby that was just repeatedly letting out those awful, high-pitched screeches that they do for no goddamn reason.

But that's what I get for going to Applebees in the first place, I suppose...
 
2014-07-31 09:52:43 AM  

skozlaw: I got comped appetizers and drinks once when I complained about the idiots behind us who were just ignoring a baby that was just repeatedly letting out those awful, high-pitched screeches that they do for no goddamn reason.


Too passive aggressive to ask the parents directly to help quiet the child?
 
2014-07-31 09:53:52 AM  

movieactors.com


"I got a wonderful window seat for your two pixies."

 
2014-07-31 09:58:03 AM  
Those of you who are cheering this sort of thing on, here are the problems:

# Assumes that all kids are equally disruptive
# What's the cutoff age? You're going to be putting every single server on the spot to enforce a subjective decision
# Older kids can be disruptive, too. Also, teenagers and adults.
# If more restaurants follow suit, imagine being a family looking for a place to eat. Finding a suitable place already has lots of "friction".
# "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.
# People using wheelchairs also take up space, will restaurants ban them too? (Obviously, no)
# People return to the restaurants they liked, these restaurants aren't just losing current customers, but also the repeat business.
# Do we really want a society where we are comfortable with businesses banning certain "types" of people? Because tomorrow it could be a group that includes you.
 
2014-07-31 10:01:50 AM  

47 is the new 42: I can understand the no loud kids, but why no high chairs or booster seats?


I'm the latter reduces the likelihood of the former.
 
2014-07-31 10:08:50 AM  

jvl


Englebert Slaptyback: I would happily buy Mr. Shake a beverage for these statements alone.

Normally I would agree. But Mr. Shake has a business on a tourist wharf visited almost entirely by families. It's a stupid location for a non-family friendly restaurant.


Counterpoint #1: as you acknowledged, not all of the tourists are families so why should every single establishment in that area be family-friendly?

Counterpoint #2: business at this place is quite good, which puts a sizable hole in your "stupid location" theory.
 
2014-07-31 10:12:31 AM  

StopLurkListen: Those of you who are cheering this sort of thing on, here are the problems:

# Assumes that all kids are equally disruptive
# What's the cutoff age? You're going to be putting every single server on the spot to enforce a subjective decision
# Older kids can be disruptive, too. Also, teenagers and adults.
# If more restaurants follow suit, imagine being a family looking for a place to eat. Finding a suitable place already has lots of "friction".
# "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.
# People using wheelchairs also take up space, will restaurants ban them too? (Obviously, no)
# People return to the restaurants they liked, these restaurants aren't just losing current customers, but also the repeat business.
# Do we really want a society where we are comfortable with businesses banning certain "types" of people? Because tomorrow it could be a group that includes you.


#Don't care.
#As old as possible.
#See previous.
#Definitely don't farking care
#Not applicable to discussion
#Not applicable to discussion
#And gaining more business and repeat business from us.
#Don't care.

Keep your farking kids in check and we will start cutting you some slack. Until then, keep the little rat bastards locked in the basement at home.
 
2014-07-31 10:18:50 AM  

StopLurkListen: Those of you who are cheering this sort of thing on, here are the problems:

# Assumes that all kids are equally disruptive
# What's the cutoff age? You're going to be putting every single server on the spot to enforce a subjective decision
# Older kids can be disruptive, too. Also, teenagers and adults.
# If more restaurants follow suit, imagine being a family looking for a place to eat. Finding a suitable place already has lots of "friction".
# "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.
# People using wheelchairs also take up space, will restaurants ban them too? (Obviously, no)
# People return to the restaurants they liked, these restaurants aren't just losing current customers, but also the repeat business.
# Do we really want a society where we are comfortable with businesses banning certain "types" of people? Because tomorrow it could be a group that includes you.


Counterpoint: People should be able to run their business any damn way they please. "We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service" sound familiar?
 
hej
2014-07-31 10:22:41 AM  

one of Ripley's Bad Guys: Too many legal issues.


I don't see the legal issue with this.  Stand your ground laws should apply.
 
2014-07-31 10:25:41 AM  

umad: StopLurkListen: Those of you who are cheering this sort of thing on, here are the problems:

# Assumes that all kids are equally disruptive
# What's the cutoff age? You're going to be putting every single server on the spot to enforce a subjective decision
# Older kids can be disruptive, too. Also, teenagers and adults.
# If more restaurants follow suit, imagine being a family looking for a place to eat. Finding a suitable place already has lots of "friction".
# "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.
# People using wheelchairs also take up space, will restaurants ban them too? (Obviously, no)
# People return to the restaurants they liked, these restaurants aren't just losing current customers, but also the repeat business.
# Do we really want a society where we are comfortable with businesses banning certain "types" of people? Because tomorrow it could be a group that includes you.

#Don't care.
#As old as possible.
#See previous.
#Definitely don't farking care
#Not applicable to discussion
#Not applicable to discussion
#And gaining more business and repeat business from us.
#Don't care.

Keep your farking kids in check and we will start cutting you some slack. Until then, keep the little rat bastards locked in the basement at home.


Actually, the wheelchair is applicable to the discussion. The reason that the owner gives for not allowing strollers or high chairs is that they create a problem for servers attempting to move about the restaurant. The same would apply also to wheelchairs. Yet, I seriously doubt that he would toss out a person in a wheelchair, as he'd have a very expensive lawsuit on his hands.
 
2014-07-31 10:26:46 AM  

StopLurkListen: "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.


This is the real issue at hand. TFA describes the restaurant in question as a romantic spot. So they clearly wouldn't want kids there to break that atmosphere. Yet they still had to put up signs to keep them out. The problem is parents who don't naturally filter themselves out.

I go to a pub that has this issue pop up from time to time. They play loud music every night, have a one page food menu and a ten page beer menu, and are in all ways clearly a pub. Yet every so often you'll see people in there with little kids or babies that are clearly unhappy to be in a dark, loud, crowded place that doesn't have any kid friendly food. It's annoying for the kids, annoying for the patrons who don't want to drink around kids, and annoying for the staff who generally don't have experience in handling kids.

It would be nice if all parents everywhere had the judgement to know exactly where kids would and would not be welcome but they don't. Thus, policies like this one.
 
2014-07-31 10:27:21 AM  

drewogatory: "We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service"


Then you won't mind when I open my restaurant catering only to Straight White Jewish Males under the age of 60 who were born in the Bronx borough of New York City. All others will be refused service.
 
2014-07-31 10:34:09 AM  

umad: StopLurkListen: Those of you who are cheering this sort of thing on, here are the problems:

# Assumes that all kids are equally disruptive
# What's the cutoff age? You're going to be putting every single server on the spot to enforce a subjective decision
# Older kids can be disruptive, too. Also, teenagers and adults.
# If more restaurants follow suit, imagine being a family looking for a place to eat. Finding a suitable place already has lots of "friction".
# "Expensive" restaurants already naturally filter out (most) families. Also: Bars/pubs/etc.
# People using wheelchairs also take up space, will restaurants ban them too? (Obviously, no)
# People return to the restaurants they liked, these restaurants aren't just losing current customers, but also the repeat business.
# Do we really want a society where we are comfortable with businesses banning certain "types" of people? Because tomorrow it could be a group that includes you.

#Don't care.
#As old as possible.
#See previous.
#Definitely don't farking care
#Not applicable to discussion
#Not applicable to discussion
#And gaining more business and repeat business from us.
#Don't care.

Keep your farking kids in check and we will start cutting you some slack. Until then, keep the little rat bastards locked in the basement at home.


I might have put it a bit more diplomatically, but ^^^THIS^^^.

Look, it's not the restaurant's responsibility to provide an air-conditioned comfort station for every family that walks by with their brood in tow, squalling or not. If your parenting skills are so poor you "entertain" your children to the point of exhaustion, that's not my problem. Take them back to the farking motel and stop off for Happy Meals on the way!

The sense of entitlement in this country, and in some of the (especially) latter posts in this thread is amazing. Bully for Mr Shank. I too would support his facility and buy him a drink.
 
2014-07-31 10:35:28 AM  

The_Six_Fingered_Man: drewogatory: "We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service"

Then you won't mind when I open my restaurant catering only to Straight White Jewish Males under the age of 60 who were born in the Bronx borough of New York City. All others will be refused service.


Entirely the same thing.  You've really exposed this injustice for what it is.

/God's work
 
2014-07-31 10:38:02 AM  
"Tourists on the wharf believe the signs are offensive."

I really wish people would learn the definition of this word. Just because you don't like something, does not mean it's offensive.
 
2014-07-31 10:42:46 AM  

The_Six_Fingered_Man: Too passive aggressive to ask the parents directly to help quiet the child?


It's almost as if, as a paying customer, I don't have to do things like that when I go out to eat. Crazy, huh?
 
2014-07-31 10:42:51 AM  
"offended some parents"

Tough shiat.  Your screaming kids and poor parenting skills are much more offensive.
 
2014-07-31 10:44:31 AM  

lewismarktwo: The_Six_Fingered_Man: drewogatory: "We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service"

Then you won't mind when I open my restaurant catering only to Straight White Jewish Males under the age of 60 who were born in the Bronx borough of New York City. All others will be refused service.

Entirely the same thing.  You've really exposed this injustice for what it is.

/God's work


The person to which I replied that they were championing that phrase as the ability for "business owners to run their business any damn way they please."

If they don't want it to be conflated with invidious discrimination based on protected classes, then perhaps a more careful choice of words is in order.
 
2014-07-31 10:53:59 AM  

skozlaw: The_Six_Fingered_Man: Too passive aggressive to ask the parents directly to help quiet the child?

It's almost as if, as a paying customer, I don't have to do things like that when I go out to eat. Crazy, huh?


I know. It's crazy to expect that a person will attempt to resolve an issue that bothers them on their own with the interested parties before escalating the situation to the management, knowing full well that they will be compensated for the "distraction." It's a terrible human interaction that all of us should avoid at all costs when we are paying customers of an establishment.

You wanted some free stuff for no other reason than the hostess sat you next to a table with a child. A child that you found abhorrent to the point that you complained to the management instead of simply walking out or talking to the parents. You are even aware that this situation is prevalent at that establishment, yet you still found it prudent to not attempt to resolve the situation like an adult, but rather you ran and complained to management.

I have to ask, what was your expectation of what the manager would be able to do for you in that situation? Did you expect them to remove the family from your presence? Was the expectation that he would comp your apps and drinks? You even admit that the child was letting out high pitched screams that they do "for no...reason."

So the child, at a family friendly restaurant, does something that cannot be explained (and thus behavior not able to be corrected) and your first inclination is to complain to management about the parents? You realize that the child is screaming for no reason, so what did you expect the parents to do? I guess your perfect scenario would have been to have the family thrown out of farking Applebees, regardless of where they are in their meal (as they are paying customers as well), simply because you cannot be arsed to have a farking conversation with the parents.

Or get free stuff, which I imagine what the complaint was always about anyway. Considering you led with the fact that you were comped leads me to believe that it wasn't about the kid at all.
 
2014-07-31 10:58:47 AM  

skozlaw: The_Six_Fingered_Man: Too passive aggressive to ask the parents directly to help quiet the child?

It's almost as if, as a paying customer, I don't have to do things like that when I go out to eat. Crazy, huh?


Never mind that anyone who has ever tried that knows the parents will immediately get defensive and talk about how the kid isn't that bad, or we should grow up because "kids make noise" or ask what we want them to do... and it ends up with no resolution and a more crappy situation for all involved.

And sorry, parents, those of us without kids DO avoid your tables in restaurants. Lots of leave if we see/hear kids upon arrival. Servers and front of house know you are costing them business at times, they know they are going to have unhappy customers as a result of the wails your kids let out for whatever reason they do it, or because they are unhappy being in a dark, adult restaurant at 9:00+ when they should be in bed, so on and so forth. None of us here are going to Chuck E Cheese and saying "OMG THERE WERE KIDS THERE" - we're talking actual sit-down restaurants, pubs, bar and grills (not chains) and we're also not going on Saturday at 12:30pm. (We avoid most places at that time... the "church crowd" and the families with kids bullshiat is just awful at that time.)

I'll always choose the places I know to be not-kid friendly, or at least, historically not crawling with kids over any place I go to once that was crawling with them or where a kid/kids disturbed my time out.  We don't have endless amounts of time to go out and do things and I plan to have fun while I am doing those things.  It's bad enough what I have to deal with at laundromats, grocery stores, etc... but those are necessities for all and I wear headphones. I could almost guarantee any "no kids allowed" (or kids UNWELCOME) restaurant will not be short on business.
 
2014-07-31 11:04:58 AM  

The_Six_Fingered_Man: drewogatory: "We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service"

Then you won't mind when I open my restaurant catering only to Straight White Jewish Males under the age of 60 who were born in the Bronx borough of New York City. All others will be refused service.



I'll pretend not to give a damn, but I will secretly crave your bagels and lox.
 
2014-07-31 11:05:48 AM  

gadian: What if you're an adult that needs a booster seat? Why discriminate against the diminutive?


Short People
 
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  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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