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(Major League Baseball)   Giants get a double play...on a walk   (m.mlb.com) divider line 28
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2562 clicks; posted to Sports » on 30 Jul 2014 at 11:08 PM (7 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-30 07:41:11 PM
It's hard to see, but in the second half they show a top-down view which is easier to follow...

Travis Snider at second base thought the bases were loaded and started to trot to third on the walk.  When the throw went to second, Gaby Sanchez at third broke for home hoping Snider would stay in the rundown long enough to allow him to score.

Just your typical 1-6-1-5 Little League double play.
 
2014-07-30 07:54:00 PM
Go Giants!
 
2014-07-30 08:33:47 PM
LOL Pirates
 
2014-07-30 10:30:33 PM
Dammit Buccos!
 
2014-07-30 10:55:55 PM
That... was terrible. Way to not know that first base was open.
 
2014-07-30 11:13:03 PM
Pirates weren't doing too bad today until suddenly.... clownshoes. Clownshoes for everyone.
 
2014-07-30 11:13:06 PM

JerkyMeat: Go Giants!


WTF Indeed: LOL Pirates


Those^
 
2014-07-30 11:52:54 PM

haemaker: It's hard to see, but in the second half they show a top-down view which is easier to follow...

Travis Snider at second base thought the bases were loaded and started to trot to third on the walk.  When the throw went to second, Gaby Sanchez at third broke for home hoping Snider would stay in the rundown long enough to allow him to score.

Just your typical 1-6-1-5 Little League double play.


I pulled two bone headed moves in high school; once in right field I Thought I seen the scoreboard saying two outs; next up was a routine fly ball and I almost trotted in; the runner on third broke home and I threw the ball 30 feet over home plate; catcher backed it up and the pitcher got his arm sliced wide open from the metal cleats - to make matters worst I am sitting there wondering wtf is going on; I see its still TWO outs on the score board; turns out the shiathead running the thing lost count himself; showing one out then two outs when I was taken out of the bullpen and went to right field; I seen two outs myself; so did the umpire; however the third base runner was the only one who knew the correct outs.

Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.
 
2014-07-31 12:33:36 AM

haemaker: It's hard to see, but in the second half they show a top-down view which is easier to follow...

Travis Snider at second base thought the bases were loaded and started to trot to third on the walk.  When the throw went to second, Gaby Sanchez at third broke for home hoping Snider would stay in the rundown long enough to allow him to score.

Just your typical 1-6-1-5 Little League double play.


Yeah, Snider = moran on that play.
 
2014-07-31 01:02:25 AM

Misconduc: Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.


That's weird twice over. First, because the rule in the major leagues for short fences (irrelevant, but still on the books) is that any "home run" of less than 250 feet is a double, not 280. How far you hit it over the fence wouldn't matter, but it's odd that the high school limit should be higher then the MLB one.

And second, because the ball should have been dead and the umpire should have grabbed you by the shoulders and parked you at second base if necessary. It's not an appeal play.
 
2014-07-31 01:40:16 AM
TOOTBLAN
 
2014-07-31 01:40:32 AM

WTF Indeed: LOL Pirates


This pretty much summed it up for me before even hitting 'play'
 
2014-07-31 02:34:29 AM

Misconduc: I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out".


Once it got to the projects it was certainly a dead ball and the umpires at your game sucked.
 
2014-07-31 07:22:08 AM
Hey.... you just don't overcome 20 years of futility overnight. You gotta ween yourself off stupid.

/go bucs
 
2014-07-31 07:27:34 AM
Looked like little league.
 
2014-07-31 08:53:40 AM

semiotix: Misconduc: Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.

That's weird twice over. First, because the rule in the major leagues for short fences (irrelevant, but still on the books) is that any "home run" of less than 250 feet is a double, not 280. How far you hit it over the fence wouldn't matter, but it's odd that the high school limit should be higher then the MLB one.


I just tried to find a photo of the field to show how screwed up it is; however I guess they redesigned the park to be a little longer (Taking out the parking lot) because right field is now 320 feet. I guess the high school playoffs that year might of screwed up a few things.
 
2014-07-31 10:18:10 AM
What is it about Giant's park that inspires such bad base running?
 
2014-07-31 10:57:46 AM

Misconduc: semiotix: Misconduc: Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.

That's weird twice over. First, because the rule in the major leagues for short fences (irrelevant, but still on the books) is that any "home run" of less than 250 feet is a double, not 280. How far you hit it over the fence wouldn't matter, but it's odd that the high school limit should be higher then the MLB one.

I just tried to find a photo of the field to show how screwed up it is; however I guess they redesigned the park to be a little longer (Taking out the parking lot) because right field is now 320 feet. I guess the high school playoffs that year might of screwed up a few things.


I'm still confused; forgive me. How can you hit a ball out of the field, over/past all that shiat, and it's not a home run? Is all that stuff in the field? Furthermore, if it went that far, how did they get the ball to third before you got there?
 
2014-07-31 11:01:00 AM
While Snider not knowing there was no one on first was a mega fail, I think Sanchez leaving third was the bigger blunder.  There was almost no way based on how that rundown was going that he was going to make it home.  Stay at 3rd and let Snider get out, maybe get the guy who walked to 2nd.
 
2014-07-31 11:30:06 AM

skrame: Misconduc: semiotix: Misconduc: Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.

That's weird twice over. First, because the rule in the major leagues for short fences (irrelevant, but still on the books) is that any "home run" of less than 250 feet is a double, not 280. How far you hit it over the fence wouldn't matter, but it's odd that the high school limit should be higher then the MLB one.

I just tried to find a photo of the field to show how screwed up it is; however I guess they redesigned the park to be a little longer (Taking out the parking lot) because right field is now 320 feet. I guess the high school playoffs that year might of screwed up a few things.

I'm still confused; forgive me. How can you hit a ball out of the field, over/past all that shiat, and it's not a home run? Is all that stuff in the field? Furthermore, if it went that far, how did they get the ball to third before you got there?


It was considered a dead ball when I hit the double; in the confusion the umpire threw the pitcher a new ball; in my confusion of why it wasn't a home run; ran to third to talk to my coach to figure out what just happened. It should of been a "dead ball" however I was still called out.
 
2014-07-31 11:30:48 AM

skrame: Misconduc: semiotix: Misconduc: Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.

That's weird twice over. First, because the rule in the major leagues for short fences (irrelevant, but still on the books) is that any "home run" of less than 250 feet is a double, not 280. How far you hit it over the fence wouldn't matter, but it's odd that the high school limit should be higher then the MLB one.

I just tried to find a photo of the field to show how screwed up it is; however I guess they redesigned the park to be a little longer (Taking out the parking lot) because right field is now 320 feet. I guess the high school playoffs that year might of screwed up a few things.

I'm still confused; forgive me. How can you hit a ball out of the field, over/past all that shiat, and it's not a home run? Is all that stuff in the field? Furthermore, if it went that far, how did they get the ball to third before you got there?


I'm not a follower of baseball, so I'm very confused.

Over the short fence = ground rule double. But then the fielder goes over the tracks, into the projects, retrieves the ball, and gets to 3rd before you? What kind of preening home run trot did you take? Forget being called out, you're lucky if the pitcher didn't put a fast ball into the side of your helmet next at bat.

If you were tagged with a new ball from the ump, is it usual for a new ball to be introduced during play? Did your high school league have multi ball? Are you from the year 3000?
 
2014-07-31 03:00:10 PM
Keith Olbermann showed this on his show late last night.  He should have had the Benny Hill music playing in the background.
 
2014-07-31 04:01:06 PM
Sloppy base running, period.
 
2014-07-31 07:46:38 PM

mcmnky: I'm not a follower of baseball, so I'm very confused.

Over the short fence = ground rule double. But then the fielder goes over the tracks, into the projects, retrieves the ball, and gets to 3rd before you? What kind of preening home run trot did you take? Forget being called out, you're lucky if the pitcher didn't put a fast ball into the side of your helmet next at bat.

If you were tagged with a new ball from the ump, is it usual for a new ball to be introduced during play? Did your high school league have multi ball? Are you from the year 3000?


Because it was considered a ground rule double, once he reached second base and then left the bag, he could legally be tagged out.  The umpire tossed a ball to the pitcher for the next batter, and it should have been a dead ball situation while he went to talk to his 3rd base coach to figure out what happened (and why it wasn't a home run), but the umpires considered it a live situation. The pitcher threw to the third baseman who tagged him, which the umps called as out because they hadn't called it a dead ball situation.
 
2014-07-31 08:19:55 PM

Misconduc: haemaker: It's hard to see, but in the second half they show a top-down view which is easier to follow...

Travis Snider at second base thought the bases were loaded and started to trot to third on the walk.  When the throw went to second, Gaby Sanchez at third broke for home hoping Snider would stay in the rundown long enough to allow him to score.

Just your typical 1-6-1-5 Little League double play.

I pulled two bone headed moves in high school; once in right field I Thought I seen the scoreboard saying two outs; next up was a routine fly ball and I almost trotted in; the runner on third broke home and I threw the ball 30 feet over home plate; catcher backed it up and the pitcher got his arm sliced wide open from the metal cleats - to make matters worst I am sitting there wondering wtf is going on; I see its still TWO outs on the score board; turns out the shiathead running the thing lost count himself; showing one out then two outs when I was taken out of the bullpen and went to right field; I seen two outs myself; so did the umpire; however the third base runner was the only one who knew the correct outs.

Second time was right before the high school world series; we played on a lopsided field that had a 280 marker in right field; apparently any ball hit from center to right field was a double - however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away, it should of been a "Home run" according to the rules; when I tried to trot around second base; the damn pitcher threw to third and I was called "out". We contested and won after the fact; pretty farking proud I hit a homerun that didn't count, the only one I did in high school.


It's a real testament to the interestingness of baseball that multiple interested parties have to expend sufficient mental effort to count to three... and still manage to fail.
 
2014-07-31 08:40:14 PM

Seat's Taken: While Snider not knowing there was no one on first was a mega fail, I think Sanchez leaving third was the bigger blunder.  There was almost no way based on how that rundown was going that he was going to make it home.  Stay at 3rd and let Snider get out, maybe get the guy who walked to 2nd.


^^^^^^^^^THIS

What the hell was the guy at third thinking?  He didn't exactly look like a Rickey Henderson burner out there.  Breaking to home was not a smart move.
 
2014-08-01 07:46:54 AM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: The umpire tossed a ball to the pitcher for the next batter, and it should have been a dead ball situation while he went to talk to his 3rd base coach to figure out what happened (and why it wasn't a home run), but the umpires considered it a live situation. The pitcher threw to the third baseman who tagged him, which the umps called as out because they hadn't called it a dead ball situation.


That is a strange combination of odd ground rules for the park and really bad umpiring.  When a pitcher receives a ball from an umpire the timeout is on Blue, and play should not commence until the runners are where they are supposed to be, the pitcher is on the mound, and Blue calls "Play!"
 
2014-08-01 10:49:03 AM

Misconduc: however considering I hit a home run that sailed OVER the parking lot; over the train tracks; into the projects almost 350 feet away


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjXZvcgHIXY
 
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