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(National Geographic)   New study indicates that our sister galaxy, Andromeda, is actually twice as massive as the Milky Way, making our galaxy the hot sister   (newswatch.nationalgeographic.com) divider line 58
    More: Interesting, Milky Way Galaxy, Andromeda Galaxy, Spiral Galaxy, dark matter, Astronomical Society, gravitational binding energy, light-years, astronomers  
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995 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jul 2014 at 1:45 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-31 01:38:23 AM  

DubtodaIll: Anyone have a handle on the percentage of stars to see at night that are in our galaxy vs. those "stars" we see that are other galaxies or stars in other galaxies?  If the milky way band we can see when it's dark enough is mostly stars from our galaxy, why are they all so fuzzy if they're relatively closer than the rest of the stars we can see?


An Issac Asimov essay I read as a teen said Andromeda is the most distant object we can see with the naked eye. I recall the quote, "So if anyone asks you how far you can see, tell them 2.5 million light years."
 
2014-07-31 04:10:05 AM  

Beowoolfie: Andromeda is the most distant object we can see with the naked eye.


I don't know where you can see it unaided. The rest of us live in cities. Sirius is about the most distant object in the night sky.
 
2014-07-31 05:30:19 AM  

doglover: Beowoolfie: Andromeda is the most distant object we can see with the naked eye.

I don't know where you can see it unaided. The rest of us live in cities. Sirius is about the most distant object in the night sky.


In the open field behind my house, rural Kentucky, 1974. But it sure didn't look like that picture! All I could see was a dim little fuzzy blob.
 
2014-07-31 05:41:25 AM  
Nonrepeating Rotating Binary
2014-07-30 01:51:49 PM


Did I miss something?
Did I slide in from a parallel dimension?

I thought we already knew this.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Yes, you did, like almost everyone else.
no, it just looks that way from here

No, we don't know anything about this, its a theory

To wit:
The air we breathe has a density of approximately 10 to the 19th power molecules per cubic centimeter. (One cubic centimeter = 1 milliliter = 1/1000 liter).

By contrast, the lowest density regions of interstellar space contains approximately 0.1 atoms per cubic centimeter.

The remaining 1% of the interstellar medium consists of dust. That's right, dust -- like the stuff that accumulates on your bookshelves and under your bed.

The properties of interstellar dust:

Composition: carbon, metals, silicates, and ice
Size of grains: 500 nanometers or less in diameter (1 nanometer = 1 billionth of a meter)
Number density of grains: 1 per million cubic meters

(That density, by the way, is equivalent to having a few dust motes floating around in Ohio Stadium.)
The properties of interstellar dust:

----- of course, even that small concentration is magnified into an opaque solid when considering the postulated number of particles in 1000 light yrs worth of dust and atoms, ions, etc.

If Andromeda were actually 2.6 -Million light years away, it would be absolutely invisible [see above]
In order for light to cohesively pass through just 1000 light years, space would have to be a lot more empty than it is.
do the math

It is far more likely that once interstellar space frontier is crossed,
there are no distances as gravity/time/space bound mammals perceive distance.
Fleshly life is not possible without Gravity/space/time.

That would account for the likelihood that Voyager can never appear to have crossed that boundary, it will linger there forever since at the boundary, distance [space] time/gravity no longer exists.
Similar to the black hole horizon theory.

Scientists still don't know if most of what they see as stars & galaxies are or are not reflections of each other, nor do they know how much is and always will be impossible to detect.

One may read ancient philosophers to get a conceptual handle on a Universe which is Infinite...

Be assured, however, the distances and sizes postulated have nothing to do with reality.

Once you're in the Blue Canoe, you will get a better view....
you won't need no food nor water,
no, you won't even remember your name.
and its a very short trip, by the way.
 
2014-07-31 06:40:20 AM  
Da Jebusfark is all that shiat?
 
2014-07-31 06:48:57 AM  

Barfmaker: And in about 4.5 billion years we're going to get a real nice up close look at it because IT'S COMING RIGHT FOR US!!!


t1.gstatic.com
 
2014-07-31 10:56:04 AM  

AdrienVeidt: Da Jebusfark is all that shiat?


Just back away slowly, don't make eye contact.
 
2014-07-31 11:34:01 PM  

doglover: Beowoolfie: Andromeda is the most distant object we can see with the naked eye.

I don't know where you can see it unaided. The rest of us live in cities. Sirius is about the most distant object in the night sky.


Sirius is 8.6 light-years away.  Canopus, the second-brightest star in our skies, is 74 light-years away.  Rigel, the 7th-brightest star in the sky (and visible even from downtown Chicago), is 1400 light-years away.  In fact, of the 26 brightest stars as seen from Earth, only Alpha Centauri is closer than Sirius.

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way easily seen from Rio de Janeiro, is about 163,000 light-years away.

Sirius isn't even close to being the most distant object visible to the unaided eye, even from a major city.

\I think you were being sarcastic
 
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