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(Salon)   Five of the dumbest and most persistent consumer conspiracy theories debunked, including why you don't need a hazmat team to clean up a broken compact fluorescent light bulb and proof there is no 300 mpg car   ( salon.com) divider line
    More: Obvious  
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4746 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 Jul 2014 at 11:55 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-30 09:22:19 AM  
1. Microwave ovens kill the nutrients in food. NOT A CONSPIRACY THEORY
3. New light bulbs must be cleaned up by hazmat crews. NOT A CONSPIRACY THEORY

/Bob The Angry Flower needs a strip for people who can't figure out what conspiracy theories are.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-30 09:23:51 AM  
Slate does not contradict the CFL cleanup story. They say the quantity of mercury in an Obamabulb(*) is less than the quantity of mercury in another object that will trigger a full scale environmental freakout if broken. They don't say what form it takes. Liquid mercury is safe. A vapor containing mercury, less safe. A vapor containing a mercury compound like methyl mercury, you'd better start writing your will before it hits your nervous system.

(*) If you want to get all technical on me, the mandate was enacted before Obama's presidency. If he didn't want his name used as a prefix he should have chosen one that didn't end in a vowel sound.
 
2014-07-30 09:34:34 AM  
The Proctor and Gamble logo is NOT a "satanic symbol"
 
2014-07-30 09:34:43 AM  

ZAZ: They say the quantity of mercury in an Obamabulb(*) is less than the quantity of mercury in another object that will trigger a full scale environmental freakout if broken.


Full-scale, environmental freakouts occur when one cracks open a can of tuna?  Maybe if your cats are wearing adorable, cat-sized hazmat costumes.
 
2014-07-30 09:46:01 AM  
What about that crazy one that says if you throw batteries in the trash can you will destroy the environment, so you need to take them to a battery recycling center. Some places even say it's the law and you will be arrested if you do it. Some even say taking them to a battery recycling center isn't good enough and you need to take them to a "Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event for safe disposal."

I throw them right in the trash! Take that mother nature and the law!

/lookout, we've got a badass over here
 
2014-07-30 09:50:35 AM  

Walker: I throw them right in the trash! Take that mother nature and the law!


Alkaline batteries used to contain heavy metals that made them a poor choice for household trash disposal.  Now they don't, so it is fine to toss dead ones.

Lithium, Ni-Cad, NiMH, and of course SLA batteries should be taken to a recycler (if your county/city doesn't take them, I know that Batteries Plus stores do).
 
2014-07-30 12:03:15 PM  
I would LOVE a plug-in hybrid diesel car.  120MPG on a bad day?   Yes, please.
 
zez
2014-07-30 12:07:54 PM  
depletedcranium.com
 
2014-07-30 12:08:25 PM  
Salon:Ooh, there's more mercury in a can of tuna, you wimps!

The Environmental Protection Agency:

Before Cleanup
Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (H&AC) system, if you have one.
Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
Stiff paper or cardboard
Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)

Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming
The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the H&AC system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
After vacuuming is completed, keep the H&AC system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.


So yeah, Salon it technically not incorrect.  You don't need an actual hazmat team.
 
2014-07-30 12:13:43 PM  
 LED bulbs are cheaper now.  Get them, no mercury worry.  Now, where is my tunafish sandwich for lunch?

And while fluoride is not a mind control agent and excessive exposure (i.e. no where near what is in our water) can cause issues, I can see why some people object to the wholesale medication of a population.  Tooth decay though, while it can be deadly, isn't contagious; unlike measles or mumps or polio.
 
2014-07-30 12:22:20 PM  
The solution to high MPG is to haul less 'car' around with you. It takes a lot of energy to stop and start a heavy steel frame, an air conditioner, a dozen different airbags and seatbelt tensioners, anti-lock brake controllers, a lead-acid battery, and your own fat ass.

This:
i.imgur.com
gets 901 MPG.
 
2014-07-30 12:22:46 PM  
Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.

And speaking of batteries?  I often wonder what impact the batteries in so-called electric vehicles are going to have on the environment when THEY have to be disposed of.  Batteries don't last forever, ya know.  And the average cost of a replacement is roughly 2K.
 
2014-07-30 12:31:51 PM  

Triumph: 1. Microwave ovens kill the nutrients in food. NOT A CONSPIRACY THEORY
3. New light bulbs must be cleaned up by hazmat crews. NOT A CONSPIRACY THEORY

/Bob The Angry Flower needs a strip for people who can't figure out what conspiracy theories are.


Give them a break, they had to fill up  FIVE-ITEM LIST.
 
2014-07-30 12:32:59 PM  
A friend of mine is averaging 1245 miles per gallon in his Chevy Volt.
 
2014-07-30 12:36:33 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.

And speaking of batteries?  I often wonder what impact the batteries in so-called electric vehicles are going to have on the environment when THEY have to be disposed of.  Batteries don't last forever, ya know.  And the average cost of a replacement is roughly 2K.


I hardly ever change light bulbs anymore, after getting rid of all my old-style ones.  The new ones use 1/5th the electricity and seem to never burn out, which is why there is such a campaign against them.
 
2014-07-30 12:44:19 PM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.

And speaking of batteries?  I often wonder what impact the batteries in so-called electric vehicles are going to have on the environment when THEY have to be disposed of.  Batteries don't last forever, ya know.  And the average cost of a replacement is roughly 2K.

I hardly ever change light bulbs anymore, after getting rid of all my old-style ones.  The new ones use 1/5th the electricity and seem to never burn out, which is why there is such a campaign against them.


Maybe the freebies were defects?  I dunno.  Noticed you didn't address what's to be done with all the HUGE spent battery-packs shipped with electric/hybrid vehicles when they've reached end of service.
 
2014-07-30 12:52:32 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: I often wonder what impact the batteries in so-called electric vehicles are going to have on the environment when THEY have to be disposed of.


I would guess that it's less than the impact of all the gasoline a regular car burns during its lifetime, assuming that the batteries are disposed of at a recycling center and not just dumped into the trash.
 
2014-07-30 12:56:24 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.

And speaking of batteries?  I often wonder what impact the batteries in so-called electric vehicles are going to have on the environment when THEY have to be disposed of.  Batteries don't last forever, ya know.  And the average cost of a replacement is roughly 2K.

I hardly ever change light bulbs anymore, after getting rid of all my old-style ones.  The new ones use 1/5th the electricity and seem to never burn out, which is why there is such a campaign against them.

Maybe the freebies were defects?  I dunno.  Noticed you didn't address what's to be done with all the HUGE spent battery-packs shipped with electric/hybrid vehicles when they've reached end of service.


The cheaper early CFLs died on me occasionally, but I haven't had to replace one for a few years now, but I've started replacing the existing incandescent bulbs that wouldn't fit the spiral bulb (enclosed space) with the LEDs that can go in enclosed spaces.  What I really need to do is rewire the garage and rip out the 8ft fluorescent fixtures (that need ballasts replaced anyways) that no one accepts the 8ft bulbs for recycling around here.

As for the batteries reuse as stationary storage batteries as well as recycle them

//Article does include some caveats because of manufacturing differences....
 
2014-07-30 12:58:38 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.


So, incandescents last just as long as CFLs, No reason to doubt that... no reason, except for the validated, repeatable tests of every major consumer organization, major bulb manufacturer, and the US government.

Hey everybody, its "that guy", no thread that even tangentially mentions lightbulbs isn't complete without "that guy"
 
2014-07-30 01:41:53 PM  
A penny: 2.5 grams
Too much salt in one day's food: 1 gram plus
Microgram: 1 millioneth of a gram
0.07 micrograms: 7 parts in 100,000,000 of a gram

Translation:  You can probably get more mercury from licking the dust off of a lightbulb than eating one.

The real conspiracy is the conservative, libertarian, fascist, and corporate FUD-mongering against any attempt to protect people with health and safety, product, or environemental regulations.

FUD=Fear Uncertainty Denial. A formula invented by a tobacco industry executive for keeping the tobacco industry big and profitable.
 
2014-07-30 01:44:40 PM  

AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.


Chances are one or more of the following is true:

1. You are lying, or at least exaggerating.
2. The freebie bulbs were total crap.
3. The electrical system in your house is in need of repair.  You probably have various electrical appliances fail on a regular basis if this is the case.  CFLs seem to be more sensitive to a badly wired house than incandescent bulbs.
 
2014-07-30 01:48:05 PM  

ZAZ: Slate does not contradict ...


Slate does not do anything. The article was from AlterNet, and was reposted on Salon. Shouldn't the original article be linked to?
 
2014-07-30 01:49:54 PM  
2. Fluoride is a mind-control drug

Wrong. Everyone knows that fluoride doesn't prevent tooth decay!

It does render teeth detectable by spy satellite.
 
2014-07-30 02:02:42 PM  

Walker: What about that crazy one that says if you throw batteries in the trash can you will destroy the environment, so you need to take them to a battery recycling center. Some places even say it's the law and you will be arrested if you do it. Some even say taking them to a battery recycling center isn't good enough and you need to take them to a "Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event for safe disposal."

I throw them right in the trash! Take that mother nature and the law!

/lookout, we've got a badass over here


Hell yea, I do that too.

When we bought our house, we found the previous owners had left a bunch of old paint in a storage space. The local hazmat recycling place charges for services, so I said fark it. I dumped it into gallon jugs, sealed them up, wrapped it into trash bags, and threw them into my dumpster.

Why make it a hassle to get rid of this stuff?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-30 02:03:47 PM  
skrame

What's a five letter word beginning with S, the name of a liberal-leaning semi-newsy web site?

*bzzzt*

ZAZ fails.
 
2014-07-30 02:25:12 PM  

monoski: A friend of mine is averaging 1245 miles per gallon in his Chevy Volt.


I have a gas powered Nissan Rogue that is getting me 37 MPG. And I can actually put stuff inside it like groceries, average size people, sporting equipment.
 
2014-07-30 02:57:53 PM  
OBAMABULB? And you farking people wonder why no one takes you seriously?

Obamabulb, lololol
 
2014-07-30 02:58:23 PM  

dforkus: So, incandescents last just as long as CFLs, No reason to doubt that... no reason, except for the validated, repeatable tests of every major consumer organization, major bulb manufacturer, and the US government.

Hey everybody, its "that guy", no thread that even tangentially mentions lightbulbs isn't complete without "that guy"


He might not be bullshiatting, he might just live in an area with shiatty power, or has old warn out receptacles.  My parents live in the boonies, and electronics in general, but light bulbs in particular, don't last anywhere near as long as they should due to issues with bad power to the home.
 
2014-07-30 03:08:15 PM  

meat0918: LED bulbs are cheaper now.  Get them, no mercury worry.  Now, where is my tunafish sandwich for lunch?


CFL's were a crappy intermediate step that didn't need to exist. LEDs are where it's at. Good LED bulbs are like $4 now and truly do last forever, unlike CFL's which, despite their supposed lifetimes, seemed to die just as fast as incandescents. An LED bulb is also a lot more resilient to mechanical issues, like being hung upside down or installed in a ceiling fan.
 
2014-07-30 03:16:59 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: Salon:Ooh, there's more mercury in a can of tuna, you wimps!

The Environmental Protection Agency:

Before Cleanup
Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (H&AC) system, if you have one.
Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
Stiff paper or cardboard
Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)

Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming
The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the H&AC system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
After vacuuming is completed, keep the H&AC system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.

So yeah, Salon it technically not incorrect.  You don't need an actual hazmat team.


I used to work in a lab at a university. We used sand as a filter smetimes and you can buy heavily treated sand from chemical supply companies. You should have read the warnings. Use gloves and full body protection, abrasive, if you get it in your eyes you're DOOMED, DOOMED I TELL YA. Yet it was just extremely clean beach sand. If you had enough of it you would let your baby play in it.
 
2014-07-30 03:18:53 PM  

brantgoose: You can probably get more mercury from licking the dust off of a lightbulb than eating one.

The real conspiracy is the conservative, libertarian, fascist, and corporate FUD-mongering against any attempt to protect people with health and safety, product, or environemental regulations.


The Environmental Protection Agency:

Before Cleanup
Have people and pets leave the room, and avoid the breakage area on the way out.
Open a window or door to the outdoors and leave the room for 5-10 minutes.
Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning (H&AC) system, if you have one.
Collect materials you will need to clean up the broken bulb:
Stiff paper or cardboard
Sticky tape (e.g., duct tape)
Damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes (for hard surfaces)
Glass jar with a metal lid (such as a canning jar) or a sealable plastic bag(s)

Cleanup Steps for Hard Surfaces
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes. Place the towels in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of hard surfaces during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available; and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Cleanup Steps for Carpeting or Rugs
Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using stiff paper or cardboard and place debris and paper/cardboard in a glass jar with a metal lid. If a glass jar is not available, use a sealable plastic bag. (NOTE: Since a plastic bag will not prevent the mercury vapor from escaping, remove the plastic bag(s) from the home after cleanup.)
Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any remaining small glass fragments and powder. Place the used tape in the glass jar or plastic bag.
Vacuuming of carpeting or rugs during cleanup is not recommended unless broken glass remains after all other cleanup steps have been taken. [NOTE: It is possible that vacuuming could spread mercury-containing powder or mercury vapor, although available information on this problem is limited.] If vacuuming is needed to ensure removal of all broken glass, keep the following tips in mind:
Keep a window or door to the outdoors open;
Vacuum the area where the bulb was broken using the vacuum hose, if available, and
Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the canister) and seal the bag/vacuum debris, and any materials used to clean the vacuum, in a plastic bag.
Promptly place all bulb debris and cleanup materials, including vacuum cleaner bags, outdoors in a trash container or protected area until materials can be disposed of.  Avoid leaving any bulb fragments or cleanup materials indoors.
Next, check with your local government about disposal requirements in your area, because some localities require fluorescent bulbs (broken or unbroken) be taken to a local recycling center. If there is no such requirement in your area, you can dispose of the materials with your household trash.
Wash your hands with soap and water after disposing of the jars or plastic bags containing bulb debris and cleanup materials.
Continue to air out the room where the bulb was broken and leave the H&AC system shut off, as practical, for several hours.
If you have further questions, please call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222.

Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the Room During and After Vacuuming
The next several times you vacuum the rug or carpet, shut off the H&AC system if you have one, close the doors to other rooms, and open a window or door to the outside before vacuuming. Change the vacuum bag after each use in this area.
After vacuuming is completed, keep the H&AC system shut off and the window or door to the outside open, as practical, for several hours.
 
2014-07-30 03:20:43 PM  

brantgoose: A penny: 2.5 grams
Too much salt in one day's food: 1 gram plus
Microgram: 1 millioneth of a gram
0.07 micrograms: 7 parts in 100,000,000 of a gram

Translation:  You can probably get more mercury from licking the dust off of a lightbulb than eating one.

The real conspiracy is the conservative, libertarian, fascist, and corporate FUD-mongering against any attempt to protect people with health and safety, product, or environemental regulations.

FUD=Fear Uncertainty Denial. A formula invented by a tobacco industry executive for keeping the tobacco industry big and profitable.


I thought it was fear uncertainty and doubt.
 
2014-07-30 03:23:43 PM  
Russ1642: I used to work in a lab at a university. We used sand as a filter smetimes and you can buy heavily treated sand from chemical supply companies. You should have read the warnings. Use gloves and full body protection, abrasive, if you get it in your eyes you're DOOMED, DOOMED I TELL YA. Yet it was just extremely clean beach sand. If you had enough of it you would let your baby play in it.

And yet, there's no EPA page on how to clean up beach sand. Or incandescent light bulbs or LED light bulbs.
 
2014-07-30 03:40:49 PM  
1) Sounds like the type of stuff that morons who use the term "natural" to describe their food would use. Microwave ovens are newer, therefor bad. To believe this one you would have to not know how a microwave works, which means you're an idiot who doesn't bother learning the basics of the world around him/her.

2) Yes, that is an actual conspiracy theory.

3) It says right on the box the bulbs come in not to throw them in landfill. So, not a hazmat team, but they DO contain mercury and should be disposed of properly. Though I just throw them in the trash because fark that.

4) Stupid, and old, conspiracy theory. The kind espoused by the guy I knew who thought mounting a wind turbine on the front of his car would let it run forever. Oh, and the real reason that car will never be sold here is a great example of how government regulation does fark with innovation.

5)  https://xkcd.com/radiation/
 
2014-07-30 03:46:55 PM  

monoski: A friend of mine is averaging 1245 miles per gallon in his Chevy Volt.


Your friend is either stealing his power, or he sucks at math.
 
2014-07-30 04:22:16 PM  

factoryconnection: ZAZ: They say the quantity of mercury in an Obamabulb(*) is less than the quantity of mercury in another object that will trigger a full scale environmental freakout if broken.

Full-scale, environmental freakouts occur when one cracks open a can of tuna?  Maybe if your cats are wearing adorable, cat-sized hazmat costumes.


Found one for a dog...
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-30 04:32:38 PM  
Tip: Don't use CFLs in humid environments, like bathrooms. I was replacing them about every two months, and switched back to incandescent.

Do the physics (stored energy vs. expended energy) even measure up for a 300 MPG car, assuming standard friction and stuff?
 
2014-07-30 04:36:51 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: And yet, there's no EPA page on how to clean up beach sand. Or incandescent light bulbs or LED light bulbs.


You posted that wall of text twice, but you didn't actually bother to link to where you got it from.
 
2014-07-30 04:47:29 PM  

Nexzus: Tip: Don't use CFLs in humid environments, like bathrooms. I was replacing them about every two months, and switched back to incandescent.


It depends on the bulb - I have a bunch of CFLs in my bathroom which have been fine for 3+ years. The ones which burn out tend to be in enclosed fixtures, probably getting hotter than whatever their power supplies are rated for.

Another tip: if you don't like LEDs, you can still buy halogen incandescents
 
2014-07-30 05:06:58 PM  

Geotpf: Manfred J. Hattan: And yet, there's no EPA page on how to clean up beach sand. Or incandescent light bulbs or LED light bulbs.

You posted that wall of text twice, but you didn't actually bother to link to where you got it from.


Well that's pretty damn embarrassing.  It came from the EPA page on how to clean up a broken CFL.;
 
2014-07-30 05:13:17 PM  

Geotpf: AllYourFarkAreBelongToMe: Some 'organization' hung bags containing 3 of those spiral shaped bulbs on everybody's door around here a while back.  So I used them.  Guess what?  They didn't last any longer than incandescent bulbs do.  So I threw them in the trash when they stopped working.

Chances are one or more of the following is true:

1. You are lying, or at least exaggerating.
2. The freebie bulbs were total crap.
3. The electrical system in your house is in need of repair.  You probably have various electrical appliances fail on a regular basis if this is the case.  CFLs seem to be more sensitive to a badly wired house than incandescent bulbs.


#3 was the case at my old apartment. CFLs were blowing out all the time there, and we actually had two wall sockets melt on us (we're lucky we didn't have a fire). Once we moved to a new place with better wiring we're seeing a lot better lifespan on our bulbs.
 
2014-07-30 05:39:15 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: Geotpf: Manfred J. Hattan: And yet, there's no EPA page on how to clean up beach sand. Or incandescent light bulbs or LED light bulbs.

You posted that wall of text twice, but you didn't actually bother to link to where you got it from.

Well that's pretty damn embarrassing.  It came from the EPA page on how to clean up a broken CFL.;


I note you left off this paragraph on that link:

What if I can't follow all the recommended steps? or I cleaned up a CFL but didn't do it properly?

Don't be alarmed; these steps are only precautions that reflect best practices for cleaning up a broken CFL. Keep in mind that CFLs contain a very small amount of mercury -- less than 1/100th of the amount in a mercury thermometer.
 
2014-07-30 05:46:39 PM  
Oh, I'm sure that language is also at the bottom of the pages for disposing for other kinds of light bulbs too, right?  Right?  I eagerly await your link on how to dispose of a broken LED or a broken incandescent.  I'm sure at the end of a wall of text there's a reassurance that it's just best practices, right?
 
2014-07-30 05:47:49 PM  
You know how I know there's no 300MPG car*?  Because I can't buy one.  If Evil Oil Company, Inc had a design for a 300MPG car, they would be falling all over themselves to get it to market.

* For any reasonable definition of "car".
 
2014-07-30 06:21:26 PM  

dukeblue219: CFL's were a crappy intermediate step that didn't need to exist. LEDs are where it's at. Good LED bulbs are like $4 now and truly do last forever, unlike CFL's which, despite their supposed lifetimes, seemed to die just as fast as incandescents. An LED bulb is also a lot more resilient to mechanical issues, like being hung upside down or installed in a ceiling fan.


Not too long ago, LEDs were $35 a pop and CFLs were $3.  CFLs weren't even commercially available back in 2001, when CFLs hit the market.  So for a good decade, it was either CFLs or incandescent.
 
2014-07-30 07:05:16 PM  
media.tumblr.com

"Bring something into this house that's gonna take all the nutrition out of our food and then light our house on fire? Thank God for me."
 
2014-07-30 07:17:32 PM  

Russ1642: brantgoose: A penny: 2.5 grams
Too much salt in one day's food: 1 gram plus
Microgram: 1 millioneth of a gram
0.07 micrograms: 7 parts in 100,000,000 of a gram

Translation:  You can probably get more mercury from licking the dust off of a lightbulb than eating one.

The real conspiracy is the conservative, libertarian, fascist, and corporate FUD-mongering against any attempt to protect people with health and safety, product, or environemental regulations.

FUD=Fear Uncertainty Denial. A formula invented by a tobacco industry executive for keeping the tobacco industry big and profitable.

I thought it was fear uncertainty and doubt.


No it isn't, now everyone's pointing at you and laughing. Aren't you uncertain and afraid you're wrong now?  You'll never live this down ... if only you had stuck with the known definition.

//walks away whistling innocently
 
2014-07-30 08:15:18 PM  
A couple of days ago I saw a reporter on RT casually mention in passing during an interview that we could have cars that run on water but 'they' won't let us have them. Putin is getting his money's worth with that crew.

/Would happily let Sophie Shevardnadze "interview" me
 
2014-07-30 08:17:35 PM  
I was folding a fitted sheet in the basement and happened to whack the CFC bulb in its socket with the back of my hand. It disintegrated like a dynamite-filled pineapple and I was left to find all the bits.

But my roommate sent into some kind of hysterics. He wanted me to start telephoning government agencies and insisted that he could "smell the mercury" several rooms and two flights of stairs away.

My roommate has some very weird opinions when it comes to lightbulbs; I can only assume his parents taught him at gunpoint to shut off the light when he leaves a room, because he's shut off the lights on the stairs while I'm on them, and killed the lights in the hall while I'm in the bathroom. Whatever energy he's saving is canceled out by the fact that, for personal use, he buys those big diesel-powered filament bulbs. CFC's clearly terrify him, and though I've brought up LED's he acts like he's never heard of them every time I mention them.

The only other people I know who follow such a weird pattern regarding new technology are his octogenarian parents.
 
2014-07-30 09:57:08 PM  
The "McDonalds burgers don't rot because of all the chemicals" is one that always seems to be going around. No, dipshiat, cook a homemade 100% beef burger the same size to well-done, keep it the same way, and see how dumb you are.
 
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