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(io9)   Remember Bruce Willis' apartment in "Fifth Element"? Well, the future is here now...and looks pretty cool, actually   (io9.com) divider line 50
    More: Interesting, rotors  
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6445 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jul 2014 at 10:01 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-30 08:02:20 AM  
I have often thought about what it would be like to design an apartment based on living on a boat. I think it has already been done by a few different people in New York and London though.

/I wonder where I would put my piles of dirty laundry and junk mail.
 
2014-07-30 08:49:09 AM  
diractev.com
 
2014-07-30 09:05:05 AM  

dittybopper: [diractev.com image 616x270]


That's what I came to say.  My work here is done.
 
2014-07-30 09:12:39 AM  
On the more serious side, if I were living by myself, I could easily downsize into an indoor living space in the neighborhood of 200 square feet, *IF* I had some outdoor breathing space.

I'm not planning to do so, because I've got a wife, a child, and a conventional house, but I could live in an "off the grid" cabin relatively easily.  A small wood stove for heating/cooking/boiling drinking water, a deep cycle battery to run the LED lighting and radio equipment*, charged with solar panels and perhaps a couple of other alternate means like thermocouples attached to the stove, a manual crank charger, small windmill, small water mill, etc., that sort of thing as appropriate to the area.

Small composting camp toilet for bodily functions.  If I'm being extra fastidious, perhaps in an outhouse, otherwise a curtained off area (in case of guests) of the cabin would be fine.

Water from some local river or lake, or just melt the snow that you have to shovel for a path anyway in the winter.

It would probably even be healthier for me:  The work associated with living like that (chopping wood, hauling water, etc.) means I'd get more exercise than I do now.

*I'm not giving up ham radio.
 
2014-07-30 09:20:30 AM  
 I am a meat popsicle
 
2014-07-30 09:48:11 AM  
Finally, a place where I can store all my.....CDs.
 
2014-07-30 10:09:27 AM  
I live in a "studio" roughly 75% that size and I could never work with that system. All those moving parts would require me to keep everything organised, which is my 4th greatest weakness.
 
2014-07-30 10:12:14 AM  
Not to be Debbie Downer, but this article has shown up repeatedly on Fark for years now.

"I live in an apartment so small, I have to step outside to change my mind!"
 
2014-07-30 10:14:07 AM  
My father in law suggested converting a house to run mostly on RV appliances with LEDs for lighting. Don't those things have a much shorter operational lifespan though?
 
2014-07-30 10:19:26 AM  

DerAppie: I live in a "studio" roughly 75% that size and I could never work with that system. All those moving parts would require me to keep everything organised, which is my 4th greatest weakness.


Sooo....  You have three *greater* weaknesses...  My race will find this information very useful indeed!   MWAHAHAHHAhahaha!
 
2014-07-30 10:22:50 AM  
Looks like an RV more than a house.

Also, none of them come equipped with a Milla Jovovich as a standard feature.
 
2014-07-30 10:25:07 AM  
No thanks. I don't really want to essentially rearrange the furniture, no matter how simple it is, every time I want to use the space for something different. Having guests for a weekend would be next to impossible too. I'll stick with my conventional house.
 
2014-07-30 10:29:10 AM  
Looks like luxury compared to some Japanese apartments I've lived in.


en.leopalace21.com
 
2014-07-30 10:30:52 AM  
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-07-30 10:38:42 AM  

dittybopper: On the more serious side, if I were living by myself, I could easily downsize into an indoor living space in the neighborhood of 200 square feet, *IF* I had some outdoor breathing space.


I think you're underestimating just how small that space is.

I once had a ~350 sf studio in NYC, and that was already really small. Certainly manageable, but after 2 years I had my fill.

And what's really deceptive about articles like this, is that all of the storage and appliances are built into the walls freeing up floor space -- you're only going to find this if you build it yourself, and you'll end up shrinking a 500 sf apartment down to 350.

Further, with storage they only take into account the most basic things, like clothes and books. For example, in my apt I still had to have a vacuum cleaner; my closet wasn't large enough for it and my clothes, so it sat out in a corner. And I had a number of kitchen appliances that also had to be left out in the open, such as a bread maker. Finally, my building didn't have storage for my bike, so that also had to be put in the apartment.
 
2014-07-30 10:41:28 AM  
The future was here years ago. That first apartment in Hong Kong probably doesn't exist anymore it's so old. I've also seen the one in Barcelona before, and not recently.
 
2014-07-30 10:46:26 AM  
My ex and I lived in a 200 square foot apartment or years.  It's perfectly fine if you are one of those outgoing people that likes to go out and treats your home as a place to crash and relax.  It is kind of liberating to pare down your possessions to the simplest elements, keeping only the things that you need.  We tried to entertain ONCE and after about fifteen minutes we all just agreed to just go out.
 
2014-07-30 10:47:50 AM  
Murphy beds are cool design wise but out of the four or five I've seen in my life only one was functional AND comfortable.  They also tend to be one of those design features that is wildly expensive.
 
2014-07-30 10:55:03 AM  

brap: Murphy beds are cool design wise but out of the four or five I've seen in my life only one was functional AND comfortable.  They also tend to be one of those design features that is wildly expensive.


Which is funny considering how utilitarian they used to be.
 
2014-07-30 10:57:04 AM  
Where is my multipass?
 
2014-07-30 10:57:54 AM  

ArkPanda: Looks like an RV more than a house.

Also, none of them come equipped with a Milla Jovovich as a standard feature.


media1.giphy.com

It's an after-market shower.
 
2014-07-30 11:02:35 AM  
I'd be okay with a place that,
with just room enough for me and a cat.
I'd spend hour after hour,
with Leeloo in the shower,
then greet a neighbor with a nice hat.

/Muuuulllteeeeeepaaaaass.
 
2014-07-30 11:17:33 AM  
So eventually the trailer park with turn into a high rise. I like having a lot of space. I have a two car garage and it's still too small.
 
2014-07-30 11:21:03 AM  
Pete and Repeat just went in to an infinite recursive loop, this news is so old, oft repeated.
 
2014-07-30 11:24:52 AM  
www.tboake.com
Really think this is a good idea?
 
2014-07-30 12:18:40 PM  
No, I do not.
/All I remember is the chick and the flying cars.
 
2014-07-30 12:23:52 PM  
I have an 840 square foot trailer home on 20 acres up in New Hampshire. Currently trying to get the power company to run a line out to it.

I'll be turning the 12X12 master bedroom into my combination bedroom, office and main engineering (there will be comm gear, computer work station, controls/indicators for the back up power systems, security systems, weather station, etc.) It will done Star Trek style, just like my current bedroom. My current bedroom is done Enterprise D style (black/beige), the new place will be done Enterprise NX-01 style (light/dark gray, brushed metal).

The key design feature will be storage space. Not one cubic foot will be wasted. Storage over and under the bed and in every unused space.  I'm even going to install airline style overhead storage bins on the ceiling. The wall between the bedroom and master bath is 2X4's with paneling on both sides. I'm removing the bedroom side panel and installing tie racks and charging stations for personal electronics and anything else I can think of in that 3 inch thick space....
 
2014-07-30 12:28:04 PM  

dittybopper: [diractev.com image 616x270]


Wrong answer
 
2014-07-30 12:36:10 PM  
you're a monster, zorg.
 
2014-07-30 01:22:22 PM  

Hal5423: I have often thought about what it would be like to design an apartment based on living on a boat.

Yup, the "tiny house" movement has long relied on items and ideas taken from sailboats.

10 feet wide at its largest and 32 feet from end-to-end, in reality, due to shape, less than 200 sq.ft inside. Technically can sleep 7, but 4 is comfortable. This will be my home for the next two months or so: It has an oven, range, microwave, 9,000 btu propane "fireplace," toilet, shower, two sinks, trash bin, couple wardrobes, dining table, couch, loveseat, desk, TV/DVD, surround sound, separate refrigerator & ice chest. 50 gallons of fresh water, batteries, solar panels, 28 gallons of fuel, 18 gallon toilet holding tank, etc.

A lot packed into a tight area, but quite efficient, and everything stays in place when tilted 30-degrees in any direction.
www.ayc.at
scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net
/I'm always dreaming of having a sailboat big enough to have its own washer/dryer - which is an option in some >38' long boats.
 
2014-07-30 01:35:30 PM  
It can't be that futuristic if it dedicates an area to a "CD rack". Precious little space in there to waste on easily damaged, outdated media.
 
2014-07-30 01:49:22 PM  

thornhill: dittybopper: On the more serious side, if I were living by myself, I could easily downsize into an indoor living space in the neighborhood of 200 square feet, *IF* I had some outdoor breathing space.


I think you're underestimating just how small that space is.

I once had a ~350 sf studio in NYC, and that was already really small. Certainly manageable, but after 2 years I had my fill.


I think you missed an important part of my post.

You don't have outdoor breathing space in NYC.  At least, not by my definition of it.  If I can store some things outside (wood for the stove, some tools, etc.), that frees up a lot of living space.
 
2014-07-30 01:49:42 PM  
The GF and I spent the first few months of our relationship sharing her 377 sqft studio before finally moving into a place with a decent sized bedroom, office, living room, and kitchen.

And after that, you know what?  fark your tiny house/apartment/studio living... It sucks balls.
 
2014-07-30 01:54:29 PM  

MrSteve007: Hal5423: I have often thought about what it would be like to design an apartment based on living on a boat.
Yup, the "tiny house" movement has long relied on items and ideas taken from sailboats.

10 feet wide at its largest and 32 feet from end-to-end, in reality, due to shape, less than 200 sq.ft inside. Technically can sleep 7, but 4 is comfortable. This will be my home for the next two months or so: It has an oven, range, microwave, 9,000 btu propane "fireplace," toilet, shower, two sinks, trash bin, couple wardrobes, dining table, couch, loveseat, desk, TV/DVD, surround sound, separate refrigerator & ice chest. 50 gallons of fresh water, batteries, solar panels, 28 gallons of fuel, 18 gallon toilet holding tank, etc.

A lot packed into a tight area, but quite efficient, and everything stays in place when tilted 30-degrees in any direction.
[www.ayc.at image 640x432]
[scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x401]
/I'm always dreaming of having a sailboat big enough to have its own washer/dryer - which is an option in some >38' long boats.


You should go the opposite direction:

http://microcruising.com/
 
2014-07-30 01:55:52 PM  

dittybopper: thornhill: dittybopper: On the more serious side, if I were living by myself, I could easily downsize into an indoor living space in the neighborhood of 200 square feet, *IF* I had some outdoor breathing space.


I think you're underestimating just how small that space is.

I once had a ~350 sf studio in NYC, and that was already really small. Certainly manageable, but after 2 years I had my fill.

I think you missed an important part of my post.

You don't have outdoor breathing space in NYC.  At least, not by my definition of it.  If I can store some things outside (wood for the stove, some tools, etc.), that frees up a lot of living space.


That's not an issue in NYC -- there is no shortage of things to do outside of your apartment. Tons of activities, park space, bars, cafés, etc.

Of course if you store things somewhere else that frees up space.
 
2014-07-30 02:09:46 PM  

thornhill: dittybopper: thornhill: dittybopper: On the more serious side, if I were living by myself, I could easily downsize into an indoor living space in the neighborhood of 200 square feet, *IF* I had some outdoor breathing space.


I think you're underestimating just how small that space is.

I once had a ~350 sf studio in NYC, and that was already really small. Certainly manageable, but after 2 years I had my fill.

I think you missed an important part of my post.

You don't have outdoor breathing space in NYC.  At least, not by my definition of it.  If I can store some things outside (wood for the stove, some tools, etc.), that frees up a lot of living space.

That's not an issue in NYC -- there is no shortage of things to do outside of your apartment. Tons of activities, park space, bars, cafés, etc.

Of course if you store things somewhere else that frees up space.


Well, the whole part of "living off the grid", using solar panels, windmill, and/or watermill, and a wood stove, should have been a bit of a clue.

Looking at it, I'd need a bed (well, a decent cot), a couple tables and a single chair, the wood stove, and some shelving for storage.  Might not even need the cot if I have a "loft" bedroom over the main living area, just a mattress of some sort on the floor would do, and that would also provide extra storage space.
 
2014-07-30 02:17:07 PM  

dittybopper: You should go the opposite direction:http://microcruising.com/

It's a neat idea, but frankly when dealing with the ocean and open seas, the size and displacement of a boat does matter, especially when it comes to speed and the amount of fresh water that can be carried. From the look of the routes on that website, the longest someone took a micro cruiser was 300 miles, with most trips in the 100 mile range. I'm leaving for a 1,000 mile trip.

Plus the simple fact that I get the crap beat out of me in 35 knot winds and 6' seas in my 32' boat (I was heading into a safe port before the 85 knot winds came in that night). Being out in those conditions in a 15' daysailor is simply asking for the sweet release of death.
 
2014-07-30 02:25:27 PM  

MrSteve007: dittybopper: You should go the opposite direction:http://microcruising.com/
It's a neat idea, but frankly when dealing with the ocean and open seas, the size and displacement of a boat does matter, especially when it comes to speed and the amount of fresh water that can be carried. From the look of the routes on that website, the longest someone took a micro cruiser was 300 miles, with most trips in the 100 mile range. I'm leaving for a 1,000 mile trip.

Plus the simple fact that I get the crap beat out of me in 35 knot winds and 6' seas in my 32' boat (I was heading into a safe port before the 85 knot winds came in that night). Being out in those conditions in a 15' daysailor is simply asking for the sweet release of death.


Pussy.  This dude sailed across the Atlantic in a 15' boat:

upload.wikimedia.org

www.wrhs.org

And he had essentially zero ocean sailing experience.
 
2014-07-30 02:30:25 PM  

dittybopper: Pussy. This dude sailed across the Atlantic in a 15' boat:

Heh, touché. Although I enjoy this quote from Wikipedia: "During the voyage Manry was knocked overboard by big waves, suffered from hallucinations, repaired a broken rudder in mid-ocean, and was woken up one morning by a surfacing submarine."

Sounds like he survived by the skin of his teeth.
 
2014-07-30 03:00:32 PM  
If it was 750 sq feet, then maybe, I have 1100 now and don't use but 750.
 
2014-07-30 03:59:26 PM  
I think I'd prefer the one in Cloud Atlas...
 
2014-07-30 04:00:50 PM  

BafflerMeal: DerAppie: I live in a "studio" roughly 75% that size and I could never work with that system. All those moving parts would require me to keep everything organised, which is my 4th greatest weakness.

Sooo....  You have three *greater* weaknesses...  My race will find this information very useful indeed!   MWAHAHAHHAhahaha!


My other weaknesses are ice cream, beer and cookies. Please don't use them against me.
 
2014-07-30 07:28:16 PM  

MrSteve007: dittybopper: Pussy. This dude sailed across the Atlantic in a 15' boat:
Heh, touché. Although I enjoy this quote from Wikipedia: "During the voyage Manry was knocked overboard by big waves, suffered from hallucinations, repaired a broken rudder in mid-ocean, and was woken up one morning by a surfacing submarine."

Sounds like he survived by the skin of his teeth.


It's a really interesting story, and he's a decent writer, so if you can find a copy of the book, I recommend reading it.
 
2014-07-30 08:11:04 PM  
pbs.twimg.com
 
2014-07-30 11:50:56 PM  

Chabash: My father in law suggested converting a house to run mostly on RV appliances with LEDs for lighting. Don't those things have a much shorter operational lifespan though?


I'm living in an RV and have been for almost a year.  I feel 111% comfortable saying, "That's a silly idea."

RV appliances have nothing to do with efficiency.  The fridge is generally a horrible bodge with multiple recall patches that make it shut down if you look at it sideways.  My favorite is the temperature-activated relay that blows a fuse if the outdoor temperature gets down to freezing.  Not joking about that.  The oven is a tiny joke that heats unevenly and unpredictably.  I've used it three times.  The microwave/convection oven is much more consistent.
 
2014-07-31 12:02:31 AM  

jtown: Chabash: My father in law suggested converting a house to run mostly on RV appliances with LEDs for lighting. Don't those things have a much shorter operational lifespan though?

I'm living in an RV and have been for almost a year.  I feel 111% comfortable saying, "That's a silly idea."

RV appliances have nothing to do with efficiency.  The fridge is generally a horrible bodge with multiple recall patches that make it shut down if you look at it sideways.  My favorite is the temperature-activated relay that blows a fuse if the outdoor temperature gets down to freezing.  Not joking about that.  The oven is a tiny joke that heats unevenly and unpredictably.  I've used it three times.  The microwave/convection oven is much more consistent.


What about gas powered ones? Are they more reliable?
 
2014-07-31 12:04:28 AM  

jtown: Chabash: My father in law suggested converting a house to run mostly on RV appliances with LEDs for lighting. Don't those things have a much shorter operational lifespan though?

I'm living in an RV and have been for almost a year.  I feel 111% comfortable saying, "That's a silly idea."

RV appliances have nothing to do with efficiency.  The fridge is generally a horrible bodge with multiple recall patches that make it shut down if you look at it sideways.  My favorite is the temperature-activated relay that blows a fuse if the outdoor temperature gets down to freezing.  Not joking about that.  The oven is a tiny joke that heats unevenly and unpredictably.  I've used it three times.  The microwave/convection oven is much more consistent.


Damnit, I brushed the trackpad and posted.

I was going to add that the fridge is as wide and tall as a conventional fridge but only 12 cubic feet because it's very shallow.  That's because of all the extra bits needed to make it run on both electricity and propane.  And it runs $2500 new.  Wait, no.  That's the old price from the last time I checked.  It's now $3000.  Oh, and it's unfinished on the sides and back because RV fridges are built into cabinets.  So you'll have to build a custom cabinet for it.

The water heater's only 6 gallons and, again, not particularly efficient.

The washer/dryer is tiny and takes about 3.5 hours to finish a wash/dry cycle.  You can fit about 2 days worth of clothes in it.  I have to wash my sheets one at a time so that's a 7 hour process.  And mine's better than most because it's actually an apartment model, not a regular RV unit.  Slightly bigger wash tub and it dries better than most ventless models.

Again, RV appliances (and RVs in general) have absolutely nothing to do with efficiency.  RV appliances are about being small, running off multiple power sources, and not falling apart after being bounced across tens of thousands of miles of washboard freeways.
 
2014-07-31 12:07:01 AM  

Chabash: jtown: Chabash: My father in law suggested converting a house to run mostly on RV appliances with LEDs for lighting. Don't those things have a much shorter operational lifespan though?

I'm living in an RV and have been for almost a year.  I feel 111% comfortable saying, "That's a silly idea."

RV appliances have nothing to do with efficiency.  The fridge is generally a horrible bodge with multiple recall patches that make it shut down if you look at it sideways.  My favorite is the temperature-activated relay that blows a fuse if the outdoor temperature gets down to freezing.  Not joking about that.  The oven is a tiny joke that heats unevenly and unpredictably.  I've used it three times.  The microwave/convection oven is much more consistent.

What about gas powered ones? Are they more reliable?


Gas-powered what?  I mentioned three things in that post.  RV appliances are not a solution for efficiency in a home.  They're just not.
 
2014-07-31 07:04:21 PM  
It sounds like the apartment is more like the Jetsons' home  (at the SkyPad Apartments in Orbit City)
than the Kramdens' (on Chauncey Street in Brooklyn).
 
rpl
2014-07-31 09:23:31 PM  
It is my sad duty to inform you of a four foot restriction on humanoid height.
 
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