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(BBC)   Scientists separate a particle from one of its physical properties creating a "quantum Cheshire Cat"   (bbc.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, quantum, magnetic moments, quoted-printable, Schrodinger, quantum superpositions, Vienna University of Technology, Chapman University, interferometry  
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2338 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jul 2014 at 4:33 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-07-30 01:25:54 AM  
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2014-07-30 06:06:12 AM  
These Cat Facts are getting out of hand.
 
2014-07-30 06:10:31 AM  
So I can claim that my TF got seperated from my account. How would you prove that I'm a non-quantum filthy lying liter?
 
2014-07-30 06:24:49 AM  
Mjau?
 
2014-07-30 06:28:59 AM  
Neutrons have a magnetic moment?
 
2014-07-30 06:32:08 AM  
Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment, like passengers and their baggage at airport security.

Yes, I'm sure it's just like that.
 
2014-07-30 07:03:47 AM  

dionysusaur: Neutrons have a magnetic moment?


They're net-netural, but they have non-neutral substructure and do interact with a magnetic field:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_magnetic_moment
 
2014-07-30 07:12:53 AM  

Delta1212: Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment, like passengers and their baggage at airport security.

Yes, I'm sure it's just like that.


I hate it when MSM uses moronic analogies.  Baggage isn't even a property of a passenger.  A better analogy would be: Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment like passengers and their dignity at airport security.
 
2014-07-30 07:19:39 AM  

profplump: dionysusaur: Neutrons have a magnetic moment?

They're net-netural, but they have non-neutral substructure and do interact with a magnetic field:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_magnetic_moment


First sentence of the wiki article starts "The neutron magnetic moment is the magnetic moment of the neutron." and, for me, goes down hill from there

Anyone care to have a better shot at "magnetic moment"? I get "magnetic", but why "moment"?
 
2014-07-30 07:40:46 AM  
Me dum. Me no understand. Sum1 xplain in dum-dum words, please?
 
2014-07-30 07:56:11 AM  

jamspoon: profplump: dionysusaur: Neutrons have a magnetic moment?

They're net-netural, but they have non-neutral substructure and do interact with a magnetic field:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_magnetic_moment

First sentence of the wiki article starts "The neutron magnetic moment is the magnetic moment of the neutron." and, for me, goes down hill from there

Anyone care to have a better shot at "magnetic moment"? I get "magnetic", but why "moment"?


It's a thingy that makes magnets spin because of magnetism.
 
2014-07-30 07:57:51 AM  
Neutron magnetic moment.

You can't explain that.
 
2014-07-30 08:29:38 AM  

jamspoon: Anyone care to have a better shot at "magnetic moment"? I get "magnetic", but why "moment"?


Roughly speaking, you put something, anything into magnetic field, that "something" will start to rotate (dislaimer: gross simplification, not valid as an answer in physics class). The strength with which it rotates (simplfication!) is called "moment", which is the shorthand for "moment of force". It is called "moment" probably because it is measured at any "moment" of time; you get the picture.

In American, laymen sometimes replace "moment"  with "torque" (do not confuse with actual physical "torque" which is a bit different.)
 
2014-07-30 08:30:29 AM  

jamspoon: profplump: dionysusaur: Neutrons have a magnetic moment?

They're net-netural, but they have non-neutral substructure and do interact with a magnetic field:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron_magnetic_moment

First sentence of the wiki article starts "The neutron magnetic moment is the magnetic moment of the neutron." and, for me, goes down hill from there

Anyone care to have a better shot at "magnetic moment"? I get "magnetic", but why "moment"?


Moment relates to the distance between the pole (by way of momentum).

As a poor analogy, a vehicle with a shorter moment of inertia (mid engine vs. front or rear) can turn quicker.
 
2014-07-30 08:36:09 AM  
Twas brillig, and the slithy toves,
did gyre and gimble in the wabe,
all mimsy, were the borogoves,
and the mome raths, outgrabe.....

/we're all mad here
//You may have noticed, I'm not all there myself
 
2014-07-30 09:08:26 AM  
So...... I'm wondering.....   If a group or set of particles could be simultaneously separated from their "magnetic moments", does this mean they will (or would ) be un affected by gravity (would that include acceleration) ?

or does it more likely mean that they would become detached from each other? or both?

anyone care to take a shot?
 
2014-07-30 09:14:28 AM  

Strik3r: So...... I'm wondering.....   If a group or set of particles could be simultaneously separated from their "magnetic moments", does this mean they will (or would ) be un affected by gravity (would that include acceleration) ?


No.

If, at any moment after separating particles from their properties there would be a situation where the quantum wave would collapse (if, for example, gravity would influence the set of particles) those properties will immediately reunite with particles and interaction would happen as if they never were separated.

Any "separation" is valid only for "weak observation" events (and even that is controversial) and not for actual real-world events.

Disclaimer: as always, it's a gross simplification, but it's not exactly possible to give non-simplified answer here, is it?
 
2014-07-30 10:08:56 AM  
This is preposterous!  How can you have a spin without a particle?!  Next you'll be telling me imaginary numbers and fourth dimensional objects are a thing!  Everything's gone to pot since they started teaching non-Euclidian mathematics in the schools!
 
2014-07-30 10:13:30 AM  

baronbloodbath: /we're all mad here
//You may have noticed, I'm not all there myself


Clearly neutrons are buggy. No electric charge, but have a magnetic moment?! Personally, I think it has to do with the inferior building products; quarks. Who designed these things?

And if you don't believe in neutrons hard enough, they decay? So, the entire basis of the nuclear weak force is Faith-based. Super.

/Hint to nuke physicists: use this approach to get funding. :-)
 
2014-07-30 12:56:13 PM  
Neutron having a magnetic moment is just similar how physicists describe some particles as massless. They actually don't mean it literally, the mass is there, but it too minuscule to have any effect in quantum mechanics.

Neutrons as whole do not interact with magnetic field, but still their substructures have a charge which interact with magnetic field thus magnetic moment.
 
2014-07-30 02:52:06 PM  

Grahor: Strik3r: So...... I'm wondering.....   If a group or set of particles could be simultaneously separated from their "magnetic moments", does this mean they will (or would ) be un affected by gravity (would that include acceleration) ?

No.

If, at any moment after separating particles from their properties there would be a situation where the quantum wave would collapse (if, for example, gravity would influence the set of particles) those properties will immediately reunite with particles and interaction would happen as if they never were separated.

Any "separation" is valid only for "weak observation" events (and even that is controversial) and not for actual real-world events.

Disclaimer: as always, it's a gross simplification, but it's not exactly possible to give non-simplified answer here, is it?


understood, but appreciated nonetheless.

so then, what's the point?

I guess I'll try reading the article again........
 
2014-07-30 02:55:31 PM  
hmmmm ..... ok... answered in TFA....

"The Cheshire Cat effect might lead to a technology which allows one to separate the unwanted magnetic moment to a region where it causes no disturbance to the high-precision measurement of the other property."
 
2014-07-30 04:11:59 PM  

Warmnight: Neutron having a magnetic moment is just similar how physicists describe some particles as massless. They actually don't mean it literally, the mass is there, but it too minuscule to have any effect in quantum mechanics.


examples please?

The photon is most definitely massless. The gluon mass is experimentally at most a few MeV/c2 but is almost certainly massless (as would be required by unbroken gauge invariance, a fundamental local symmetry of nature).
The neutrino was once thought to be massless, but now we know that it must have mass - a very very small mass, but non-zero.
 
2014-07-30 05:49:13 PM  

Delta1212: Researchers took a beam of neutrons and separated them from their magnetic moment, like passengers and their baggage at airport security.

Yes, I'm sure it's just like that.


Once they figure out how to make the neutrons pay fifty bucks a pop, they've got it made.
 
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