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(io9)   Scientists decide to find out if rats on drugs enjoy listening to Miles Davis as much as scientists on drugs do   (io9.com) divider line 41
    More: Interesting, saline, musical cue, enclosures  
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813 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jul 2014 at 2:19 PM (12 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-29 11:56:22 AM  
'biatches Brew' on the turn table would have made this experiment a LOT more interesting...
 
2014-07-29 12:24:30 PM  
 
2014-07-29 01:08:25 PM  
www.michaelspornanimation.com
 
2014-07-29 02:36:10 PM  
Brought to you by the same scientists who have spent decades researching the perfect movie to sync to Dark Side of the Moon.
 
2014-07-29 02:36:19 PM  
can't think of a funny comment so here's an obscure* reference:

bargeek.files.wordpress.com

*not actually obscure
 
2014-07-29 02:37:32 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

musictosuperscienceto.com

musictosuperscienceto.com

As long as they don't enter a Floyd Hole, those rats are perfectly safe
 
2014-07-29 02:43:09 PM  
FTA: (Now if the next experiment gets the rats to respond physically and behaviorally to John Cage's 4'33", I'd be very impressed.)

Didn't you just say that the rats preferred silence? Now your contradicting yourself.
 
2014-07-29 03:11:37 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-29 03:16:35 PM  
Ornette Coleman

For the flashbacks...
 
2014-07-29 03:24:19 PM  
I dunno, do the rats have pants to pee in?
 
2014-07-29 03:31:07 PM  
If you are trying to find jazz that you have to be "high" to appreciate, I doubt that Miles Davis will
be that effective.  (On the other hand, anything labeled as "acid jazz" might help; why do you think
it's called "acid" jazz?)
 
2014-07-29 03:35:25 PM  
There was an experiment conducted, I think at the Philadelphia Zoo, in the 1940s which involved
chimpanzees and Tommy Dorsey's band.  When Dorsey's band played a song that was very loud,
the chimps were scared to death and freaked out; some tried to run away; one even tried to swipe
Tommy Dorsey's trombone out of his hands.  When the band switched to a song that was quiet,
the chimps calmed down and even watched with some interest.  It's likely that other species would
have similar reactions.
 
2014-07-29 04:37:49 PM  

Tax Boy: As long as they don't enter a Floyd Hole, those rats are perfectly safe


Would playing King Crimson turn them into Pinky and the Brain?
 
2014-07-29 04:40:37 PM  

Li'l Robbie: If you are trying to find jazz that you have to be "high" to appreciate, I doubt that Miles Davis will
be that effective.  (On the other hand, anything labeled as "acid jazz" might help; why do you think
it's called "acid" jazz?)


Because "acid" was popular word at the time?
 
2014-07-29 04:44:54 PM  
Hey. You ever been a rat on coke... on weed?
 
2014-07-29 04:46:39 PM  
For their next experiment these researches are asking for Grateful Dead concert bootlegs.
 
2014-07-29 04:48:14 PM  
Miles Davis and Kenny G:

i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-29 04:49:07 PM  

Li'l Robbie: If you are trying to find jazz that you have to be "high" to appreciate, I doubt that Miles Davis will
be that effective.  (On the other hand, anything labeled as "acid jazz" might help; why do you think
it's called "acid" jazz?)


why not? jazz and drugs have gone hand in hand since the 1920s, maybe even earlier. i would surmise that miles davis' heroin habit probably had quite a bit to do with how his music sounds .

'acid jazz' was mainly dj's exploring jazz in the 80s and 90s, either by sampling it or adding beats to live jazz playing, and doesn't necessarily have anything particularly specific to do with drugs, i think mainly the name was borrowed from acid house which was also gaining popularity at the time (and probably does have a more specifically related etymology as hallucinogens were widely used in the club scene at the time.. but consider the trademark 303 sound and filtering-based composition that identifies acid house is not really found in acid jazz at all)
 
2014-07-29 04:56:28 PM  

T.rex: Miles Davis and Kenny G:

[i.imgur.com image 600x425]


img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-29 05:10:53 PM  
High hats for Algernon.
 
2014-07-29 05:15:15 PM  
 
2014-07-29 05:19:05 PM  
I thought scientists on drugs preferred Rush?
 
2014-07-29 05:45:03 PM  

BATMANATEE: I thought scientists on drugs preferred Rush?


I've only experimented with scientists on booze, but metal was very popular.
 
2014-07-29 05:47:12 PM  
I've done research using animal models of drug addiction so I'm getting a kick...

For the cocaine study, the researchers used a variant of a conditioned place preference (CPP) test. After initially determining the baseline preference of each rat (by measuring the amount of time spent in the side playing Miles Davis' "Four" vs. the side playing Beethoven's "Fur Elise"), they then paired cocaine with the music least preferred at baseline (18/20 preferred Beethoven over Davis; in a separate group, 12/16 preferred silence over Beethoven). Unsurprisingly, cocaine produced a preference for the cocaine-paired environmental stimuli, as would be predicted by over 3000 previous studies using CPP.

This is great scientific work if you want lay press attention, but it barely qualifies as an incremental advance within the field. Ugh.
 
2014-07-29 06:35:44 PM  

BATMANATEE: I thought scientists on drugs preferred Rush?


They prefer blues, baby, blues.
 
2014-07-29 06:51:33 PM  
Next experiment?

userserve-ak.last.fm

/I've got my suit on
//It's razor sharp
 
2014-07-29 07:19:06 PM  
fc09.deviantart.net
 
2014-07-29 08:31:06 PM  
Well, they'd already seen what the spiders would do on drugs, so I guess rats were the next logical conclusion...


/for more information about the crack spider's biatch...
 
2014-07-29 09:43:16 PM  
Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?
 
2014-07-29 10:06:24 PM  

MessyDwarf: [fc09.deviantart.net image 800x1066]


Was waiting for this, leaving satisfied.

/Cage and Alice, a love (of cocaine) story for the ages.
 
2014-07-29 10:13:45 PM  

John Buck 41: Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?


Some have told me this is true......though I would not know myself.
 
2014-07-29 10:14:37 PM  

TabASlotB: I've done research using animal models of drug addiction so I'm getting a kick...

For the cocaine study, the researchers used a variant of a conditioned place preference (CPP) test. After initially determining the baseline preference of each rat (by measuring the amount of time spent in the side playing Miles Davis' "Four" vs. the side playing Beethoven's "Fur Elise"), they then paired cocaine with the music least preferred at baseline (18/20 preferred Beethoven over Davis; in a separate group, 12/16 preferred silence over Beethoven). Unsurprisingly, cocaine produced a preference for the cocaine-paired environmental stimuli, as would be predicted by over 3000 previous studies using CPP.

This is great scientific work if you want lay press attention, but it barely qualifies as an incremental advance within the field. Ugh.


Who is the granting body that's taking money away from legitimate basket weaving studies to pay for that shiat
 
2014-07-30 12:51:29 AM  

John Buck 41: Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?


This. I cannot figure out what people love about Miles Davis. Must be a white person thing.

I'm not a huge jazz fan in general, admittedly, but I'd rather listen to Al DiMeola or John Pattitucci and call it a day.
 
2014-07-30 01:58:48 AM  

Fonaibung: John Buck 41: Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?

This. I cannot figure out what people love about Miles Davis. Must be a white person thing.

I'm not a huge jazz fan in general, admittedly, but I'd rather listen to Al DiMeola or John Pattitucci and call it a day.


Friday Night in San Francisco is farking brilliant!
 
2014-07-30 02:50:40 AM  

ChubbyTiger: BATMANATEE: I thought scientists on drugs preferred Rush?

I've only experimented with scientists on booze, but metal was very popular.


... I find this oddly disturbing, so a couple follow-up questions, if you would:

1. What kind of metal?
2. What kind of scientists?
 
2014-07-30 05:44:01 AM  

findthefish: John Buck 41: Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?

Some have told me this is true......though I would not know myself.


Yeah, who wants to waste a nice buzz on some drugs listening to shiat music? That's a recipe for a hard comedown.
 
2014-07-30 08:16:27 AM  

Tax Boy: As long as they don't enter a Floyd Hole, those rats are perfectly safe


But no air drumming this time. Bruford can change the timing up so fast you could snap your wrist.
 
2014-07-30 08:29:01 AM  

Fonaibung: John Buck 41: Isn't all crappy music better when listened to while on drugs?

This. I cannot figure out what people love about Miles Davis. Must be a white person thing.

I'm not a huge jazz fan in general, admittedly, but I'd rather listen to Al DiMeola or John Pattitucci and call it a day.


I think it's the notion that Miles Davis has casual name recognition, among white persons.
 
2014-07-30 11:10:07 AM  
"The scientists then injected cocaine into the drugs"

Yeah I think I know where all the coke actually went.
 
2014-07-30 12:22:39 PM  

with great power comes great insanity: TabASlotB: I've done research using animal models of drug addiction so I'm getting a kick...

For the cocaine study, the researchers used a variant of a conditioned place preference (CPP) test. After initially determining the baseline preference of each rat (by measuring the amount of time spent in the side playing Miles Davis' "Four" vs. the side playing Beethoven's "Fur Elise"), they then paired cocaine with the music least preferred at baseline (18/20 preferred Beethoven over Davis; in a separate group, 12/16 preferred silence over Beethoven). Unsurprisingly, cocaine produced a preference for the cocaine-paired environmental stimuli, as would be predicted by over 3000 previous studies using CPP.

This is great scientific work if you want lay press attention, but it barely qualifies as an incremental advance within the field. Ugh.

Who is the granting body that's taking money away from legitimate basket weaving studies to pay for that shiat


Actual answer: it's a side project--it looks like it was a grad student's project--that was funded by this grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Given the equipment & animal numbers used, it was a cheap study. Your grant renewal to continue valued basket weaving research is likely not threatened...
 
2014-07-30 08:58:38 PM  
img.fark.net
 
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