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(Politico)   "The Common Core PR War" If you draw this line, at one end is where we started, the other is where we want to go. Currently, you've stuck us somewhere beyond where we started with all your obtuse questions   (politico.com) divider line 56
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954 clicks; posted to Politics » on 29 Jul 2014 at 12:00 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-29 10:16:31 AM  
CORE WARS!

;redcode-94nop
;name Myrmidon
;author Roy van Rijn
;strategy Bombing oneshot
;assert 1
ptr     dat     0,     sScan-7
        dat     0,      0
        dat     0,      0
sw      dat     1,      14
g2      spl     #24,    14
        dat     0,      0
        dat     0,      0
clr     spl     #sStep, sStep
        mov     *sw,    >ptr
        mov     *sw,    >ptr
        djn.f   -2,     }g2
for     15
        dat     0,      0
rof
sOff    equ     4202
sStep   equ     32
sDiff   equ     4021
sGo     add.f   clr,    sScan
        mov     sBomb,  *1
sScan   sne     *sOff,  >(sOff+sDiff)-7
        djn.f   sGo,    @-1
        add.b   sScan,  ptr
        jmp     clr,    <2533
for     5
        dat     0,      0
rof
sBomb   mov     sDiff,  1
end sGo

 
2014-07-29 11:05:05 AM  
Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.
 
2014-07-29 11:17:07 AM  
DAMN OBAMA AND HIS SOCIALIST CURICULUM!
 
2014-07-29 11:27:58 AM  

Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.


I wrote most of this this in the last thread on Common Core. I've updated it to reflect the passage of time and more recent experience.s

My son recently finished first grade at a school where they've adopted Common Core. They also have a big honking smart media board at the front of the classroom, which my son insists that they use to watch videos at least 10 minutes out of every hour..

Instead of spending their math lessons actually learning addition and subtraction, by writing numbers, they take most of their time filling in boxes with different colors. My son learned to count when he was 3 and could add single-digit numbers to form two-digit numbers when he was 4. We stopped practicing with him when he started his school lessons at age 6, and he actually forgot the simple addition because of all the distractions.

We now have him do math exercises at home for a half-hour every evening and his performance is back to where it was when he was 4.

Common Core is a set of standards and methods. Major elements of these methods are total bullshiat and not conducive to learning basic math and reading.
 
2014-07-29 11:35:20 AM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.

I wrote most of this this in the last thread on Common Core. I've updated it to reflect the passage of time and more recent experience.s

My son recently finished first grade at a school where they've adopted Common Core. They also have a big honking smart media board at the front of the classroom, which my son insists that they use to watch videos at least 10 minutes out of every hour..

Instead of spending their math lessons actually learning addition and subtraction, by writing numbers, they take most of their time filling in boxes with different colors. My son learned to count when he was 3 and could add single-digit numbers to form two-digit numbers when he was 4. We stopped practicing with him when he started his school lessons at age 6, and he actually forgot the simple addition because of all the distractions.

We now have him do math exercises at home for a half-hour every evening and his performance is back to where it was when he was 4.

Common Core is a set of standards and methods. Major elements of these methods are total bullshiat and not conducive to learning basic math and reading.


So why does the official website for Common Core bluntly state that "These Standards do not dictate curriculum or teaching methods" (emphasis mine)? Are they lying through their teeth?
 
2014-07-29 11:37:47 AM  

Shostie: DAMN OBAMA AND HIS SOCIALIST CURICULUM!


...because NCLB just worked out so well, and if it was good enough to give foreigners a leg up in admissions to our schools, then it should be good enough for the global economy hippies today.

Boils down to it: some schools fear the standards, because it means that they might have scrutiny to how much Jesus they throw in, how much "gheys are bad" and "America has won every war its ever been in, because in Vietnam we just advanced to the rear and Korea lost itself, and we just made sure that people were safe from the Red Chinese." It boils down to fears of centralized control over their schools, because common standards are a feature within all states, but mandated by the states, and this, for them, appears to be a Federalizing of their schools, because as we all know, if the Fed gets control of roads, or mail, or parks, they inevitably make sure that it has equal access, and that is just bad for local businesses. Because. Jesus.

It comes down to the reforms that have been on the backburner since the Clinton years, and which were derailed by NCLB, and simply put, Common Core is about preparing students for college or work, and when people rail against these standards it comes down to either posturing to be that guy, or realization that their tiny little slice of school is NOT going to be able to continue to force feed students malarky and call it education. Yes, I'm looking at you schools that teach about cavemen riding dinosaurs and Noah saving all the animals except the ones that were particularly wicked which is why the dinosaurs died out, trapped under all that mud, which is why we find them in rocks today.

Common Core is just about standards that all schools should work for in math skills, reading, writing, and basic skills. There IS some debate about the standards, and if they are going to be agile enough in application, and there is some discussion about adding more higher order thinking skills to the program. It is about being able to compete in a global economy, and the sad thing is, while there IS some good reason to debate the skills sets and content, it tends to devolve into "the gub'ment is going to teach mah babies evolution and multiculturalisms!" When we let idiots and the folks who profit from idiots a'skeered for their babies learnin' that demon science and reading all them high tone books written by wimminfolk and darkies, then we have issues like we see in the debates on Common Core. It's long past time to get the idiots out of the debate, much like we need to get profiteering testing companies out of the business of education, because oddly enough, when you have testing companies in on the discussion, invariably, MOAR TESTING magically becomes the mantra.
 
2014-07-29 11:39:45 AM  
Essentially, yes. They provide a variety of curriculum elements and teaching methods, but very few of them conform to the standard tests that measure student aptitude under the Common Core program. So teachers either have to use the methods that are employed in the tests or watch their salaries drop as the kids don't score as well on the tests as others, because they haven't been taught their methodology.
 
2014-07-29 11:47:23 AM  
Common Core lost once a bunch of 34-year-olds with preschoolers saw that Facebook math problem they said was too hard for first graders and freaked out. Idiots.
 
2014-07-29 11:55:14 AM  

hubiestubert: Shostie: DAMN OBAMA AND HIS SOCIALIST CURICULUM!

...because NCLB just worked out so well, and if it was good enough to give foreigners a leg up in admissions to our schools, then it should be good enough for the global economy hippies today.

Boils down to it: some schools fear the standards, because it means that they might have scrutiny to how much Jesus they throw in, how much "gheys are bad" and "America has won every war its ever been in, because in Vietnam we just advanced to the rear and Korea lost itself, and we just made sure that people were safe from the Red Chinese." It boils down to fears of centralized control over their schools, because common standards are a feature within all states, but mandated by the states, and this, for them, appears to be a Federalizing of their schools, because as we all know, if the Fed gets control of roads, or mail, or parks, they inevitably make sure that it has equal access, and that is just bad for local businesses. Because. Jesus.

It comes down to the reforms that have been on the backburner since the Clinton years, and which were derailed by NCLB, and simply put, Common Core is about preparing students for college or work, and when people rail against these standards it comes down to either posturing to be that guy, or realization that their tiny little slice of school is NOT going to be able to continue to force feed students malarky and call it education. Yes, I'm looking at you schools that teach about cavemen riding dinosaurs and Noah saving all the animals except the ones that were particularly wicked which is why the dinosaurs died out, trapped under all that mud, which is why we find them in rocks today.

Common Core is just about standards that all schools should work for in math skills, reading, writing, and basic skills. There IS some debate about the standards, and if they are going to be agile enough in application, and there is some discussion about adding more higher order thinking skills to the progra ...


I'd just like to point out that you just spent nearly 500 words responding to a throwaway joke post.
 
2014-07-29 12:00:40 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Essentially, yes. They provide a variety of curriculum elements and teaching methods, but very few of them conform to the standard tests that measure student aptitude under the Common Core program. So teachers either have to use the methods that are employed in the tests or watch their salaries drop as the kids don't score as well on the tests as others, because they haven't been taught their methodology.


Ten minutes of video or more every hour? Every day? I know it's been decades since I was in elementary school, but I don't remember that ever happening during my education. I think the more likely explanation for your kid's regression is that your son's teacher is terrible at their job.
 
2014-07-29 12:03:22 PM  
I'm all for using a national education guidelines to break the hold of the Texas school board on book content and create a target for all schools. I'm not okay with tying it unfairly to teacher performance, more testing, and continuing to treat technology as a silver bullet.

Bezos and Gates do some great philanthropy but I feel their buy into the tech world version of meritocracy is misguided and even if true doesn't map to schools. A coder has a clear log of what code they checked in and out, they can see who introduced bugs and theoretically have the same tools as everyone else working on the code. A teacher has a kid for at most 40 hours a week of 168 hours, is resource limited by local property taxes, and factors well outside their control. If a kid is living on their uncles couch cause their mom is working to save up enough to move into an apt and has to skip meals to get by is it the teachers fault the kid is not concentrating in class? The only testing standard I would support is one that tests kids twice year, start of school and end of school and judges the teachers based on a personalized metric of their students. Trying to tell a teacher in Compton to compete with a teacher in Thousand Oaks or on the South Side of Chicago with Wilmette is just unfair, to tie their pay or job security to that is even worse.

Common Core will ended up being a further boom to which ever publishing company can push their books the most, scan-trons and blue books, it will do no more to help kids then any other metric based education system we have been pushing for the last 30 years. And teachers are no less the product of the system then the students, the issues are much further up stream
 
2014-07-29 12:04:12 PM  
I feel our Marines should be held to a high standard.
 
2014-07-29 12:07:10 PM  
I have 15 advanced maths degrees and I cant understond my kid's homework now.

Thanks Obummer
 
2014-07-29 12:08:05 PM  
...the common core teacher was albert einstein!
 
GBB
2014-07-29 12:09:37 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.

I wrote most of this this in the last thread on Common Core. I've updated it to reflect the passage of time and more recent experience.s

My son recently finished first grade at a school where they've adopted Common Core. They also have a big honking smart media board at the front of the classroom, which my son insists that they use to watch videos at least 10 minutes out of every hour..

Instead of spending their math lessons actually learning addition and subtraction, by writing numbers, they take most of their time filling in boxes with different colors. My son learned to count when he was 3 and could add single-digit numbers to form two-digit numbers when he was 4. We stopped practicing with him when he started his school lessons at age 6, and he actually forgot the simple addition because of all the distractions.

We now have him do math exercises at home for a half-hour every evening and his performance is back to where it was when he was 4.

Common Core is a set of standards and methods. Major elements of these methods are total bullshiat and not conducive to learning basic math and reading.

  
And this is why I'm already planning out how I will be supplementing my unborn son's public school education with some at-home help.  My father did this with me and I did much better than my peers to the point he tried to get me to skip grades.  The only problem with that was that I was (am) socially retarded and didn't do well being an outcast.  Hopefully, I can learn from that lesson and do better for my son.
 
2014-07-29 12:10:55 PM  
Common Core invaded my home, raped my wife, and lit all of our books on fire, leaving only The Audacity of Hope and Rules for Radicals.
 
2014-07-29 12:13:32 PM  
I know that when it comes to my children's education, I primarily seek input from people who anonymously argue politics on the internet all day long.
 
2014-07-29 12:13:52 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.

I wrote most of this this in the last thread on Common Core. I've updated it to reflect the passage of time and more recent experience.s

My son recently finished first grade at a school where they've adopted Common Core. They also have a big honking smart media board at the front of the classroom, which my son insists that they use to watch videos at least 10 minutes out of every hour..

Instead of spending their math lessons actually learning addition and subtraction, by writing numbers, they take most of their time filling in boxes with different colors. My son learned to count when he was 3 and could add single-digit numbers to form two-digit numbers when he was 4. We stopped practicing with him when he started his school lessons at age 6, and he actually forgot the simple addition because of all the distractions.

We now have him do math exercises at home for a half-hour every evening and his performance is back to where it was when he was 4.

Common Core is a set of standards and methods. Major elements of these methods are total bullshiat and not conducive to learning basic math and reading.


I think the issue here might be that individual school districts (or states) come up with bullshiat methods to meet Common Core standards.  Those methods are not actually part of the Common Core standards, however, and other school districts/states would use completely different methods.
 
2014-07-29 12:15:06 PM  

Serious Black: Two Dogs Farking: Essentially, yes. They provide a variety of curriculum elements and teaching methods, but very few of them conform to the standard tests that measure student aptitude under the Common Core program. So teachers either have to use the methods that are employed in the tests or watch their salaries drop as the kids don't score as well on the tests as others, because they haven't been taught their methodology.

Ten minutes of video or more every hour? Every day? I know it's been decades since I was in elementary school, but I don't remember that ever happening during my education. I think the more likely explanation for your kid's regression is that your son's teacher is terrible at their job.


The videos they watch are ostensibly related to the current lessons, but it really just gives the teacher a 10-minute break every hour.

What really bugs me is that have no actual first-hand experience with Common Core, but still feel qualified to criticize others that do.

/Asshole-like typing detected
 
2014-07-29 12:18:22 PM  
And while all of the debate about common core in schools rages on, mostly by people who have never spent a single minute in a common core classroom to see what really goes on, ETS has managed to fark the next generation of teachers with a bait and switch on THEIR testing as well.  /CSB -- I took the Praxis I last fall, in anticipation of pursuing a MAT this coming fall...only to find out over the summer that the Praxis I test I took is no longer acceptable and now I have to take the Praxis I CORE (which, by the way is the SAME test with the SAME format as the old Praxis I) at the cost of another $135, just to prove I can read and do basic math well enough to enter an Alternative License Program in the fall.  The 3.64 GPA in my BA program, the prior Praxis I score that far exceeded the state minimum, the MAT test that far exceeded the minimum, and the Praxis II test that far exceeded the minimum mean nothing.  I have to prove yet again that I can read, write, and do basic mathematics just to get INTO a teaching program, at my own expense.  I do not know who on the Dept of Education standards board in my state is also a major shareholder at ETS, but I hope he or she dies of anal cancer soon.  No farking wonder they have trouble finding Highly Qualified Teachers, the lunatics are running the asylum!
 
2014-07-29 12:18:46 PM  
"firestorm"

I must have missed it.
 
2014-07-29 12:19:06 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Two Dogs Farking: Essentially, yes. They provide a variety of curriculum elements and teaching methods, but very few of them conform to the standard tests that measure student aptitude under the Common Core program. So teachers either have to use the methods that are employed in the tests or watch their salaries drop as the kids don't score as well on the tests as others, because they haven't been taught their methodology.

Ten minutes of video or more every hour? Every day? I know it's been decades since I was in elementary school, but I don't remember that ever happening during my education. I think the more likely explanation for your kid's regression is that your son's teacher is terrible at their job.

The videos they watch are ostensibly related to the current lessons, but it really just gives the teacher a 10-minute break every hour.

What really bugs me is that have no actual first-hand experience with Common Core, but still feel qualified to criticize others that do.

/Asshole-like typing detected


I'm assuming that you've spent a reasonable amount of time in your son's classroom observing this yourself.  After all, it would be pretty strange to take a seven year old child's opinion on the actions of his teacher at face value.  Almost as strange as repeatedly stating that something is what it isn't (ie. Common Core as a methodology and assessment tool).
 
2014-07-29 12:20:09 PM  

JerseyTim: Common Core lost once a bunch of 34-year-olds with preschoolers saw that Facebook math problem they said was too hard for first graders and freaked out. Idiots.


I'd say it lost when they pushed it on high school kids that had been trained to pass one test in their life and parents freaked out because it was different than they did and some states (like Oregon) have increased graduation requirements and made the tests harder.

It would be better if the states had slowed down the implementation a bit, introduced it in Kindergarten, then as that first Kindergarten class moved up through the grades Common Core would follow them.  It would probably breakdown once those kids reached High School and started mixing with other grade levels a bit more in the classroom.

I know I balked at some of what my kids were doing in math, but I got the hang of it after I read the standards and adopted a method of asking my children what they are trying to do when they get stuck.  They get part way through explaining it to me, get a look of realization on their faces and say "Oh!  Never mind, I got it".

Their estimation stuff bogged me down briefly because I wanted the exact answer because I misread the question.

My favorite Common Core complaints come from English teachers though that demonstrate a lack of reading comprehension, thinking skills, and imagination when they dump Shakespeare and add in the reading materials exactly as given in the Common Core standards as examples for reading materials for science or social studies classroom.
 
2014-07-29 12:22:04 PM  

Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.


Requiring students to explain basic mathematical functions instead of only requiring them to correctly execute those functions is farking ridiculous, a waste of time, and is going to be a huge impediment to children as they work their way up to more complex higher maths.
 
2014-07-29 12:23:06 PM  
I'm reading H. G. Wells "Experiment in Autobiography". Back in the 1880s he was working for a company that taught people how to pass certification exams; he wrote several textbooks which contained nothing except information that appeared on the exams; all the while decrying the poor education people were receiving.
 
2014-07-29 12:26:58 PM  
I'be always hated math and I'm really bad at math but for some reason I can't understand why they are teaching math that way! It doesn't make sense! I need to go on Facebook and complain about the commoncore math not making sense.
 
2014-07-29 12:27:07 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Two Dogs Farking: Essentially, yes. They provide a variety of curriculum elements and teaching methods, but very few of them conform to the standard tests that measure student aptitude under the Common Core program. So teachers either have to use the methods that are employed in the tests or watch their salaries drop as the kids don't score as well on the tests as others, because they haven't been taught their methodology.

Ten minutes of video or more every hour? Every day? I know it's been decades since I was in elementary school, but I don't remember that ever happening during my education. I think the more likely explanation for your kid's regression is that your son's teacher is terrible at their job.

The videos they watch are ostensibly related to the current lessons, but it really just gives the teacher a 10-minute break every hour.

What really bugs me is that have no actual first-hand experience with Common Core, but still feel qualified to criticize others that do.

/Asshole-like typing detected


Yes. I'm an asshole. You don't like it? Tough shiat.

As for the bolded comment, tons of people criticize others on issues regardless of a lack of experience. How many people here criticize someone's views on foreign policy when they themselves have not served overseas in the Departments of Defense or State? How many people criticize someone's views on health care policy when they themselves have never been employed as a doctor, a nurse, or in any part of the health care sector? How many people criticize business strategies when they themselves have never been the owner and/or CEO of a business? Are all of those people completely unqualified to make judgments in those arenas? I don't think so. Practical experience can be useful, but it's not a vaccine against criticism from others who aren't already invested.
 
2014-07-29 12:30:11 PM  
They shot themselves in the foot right off the bat.

Look, there were a lot of good ideas in the Common core.  But they stupidly decided to do things like change terminology for no reason.

Deciding to replace the word 'equation' with the descriptive  'math sentence',  made them look like incompetent morons trying to paint an old car and call it new.

As a result their parents feel stupid when they try to answer simple math questions that are part of the common core, even if the parents actually know the answers, they can't understand the question.
 
2014-07-29 12:33:50 PM  

Serious Black: Yes. I'm an asshole. You don't like it? Tough shiat.

As for the bolded comment, tons of people criticize others on issues regardless of a lack of experience. How many people here criticize someone's views on foreign policy when they themselves have not served overseas in the Departments of Defense or State? How many people criticize someone's views on health care policy when they themselves have never been employed as a doctor, a nurse, or in any part of the health care sector? How many people criticize business strategies when they themselves have never been the owner and/or CEO of a business? Are all of those people completely unqualified to make judgments in those arenas? I don't think so. Practical experience can be useful, but it's not a vaccine against criticism from others who aren't already invested.


Do you think you'll sway anyone by being belligerent because they don't agree with you? Or do you just enjoy belittling people on the internet?
 
2014-07-29 12:35:26 PM  

tarkin1: They shot themselves in the foot right off the bat.

Look, there were a lot of good ideas in the Common core.  But they stupidly decided to do things like change terminology for no reason.

Deciding to replace the word 'equation' with the descriptive  'math sentence',  made them look like incompetent morons trying to paint an old car and call it new.

As a result their parents feel stupid when they try to answer simple math questions that are part of the common core, even if the parents actually know the answers, they can't understand the question.


And that is why I recommend reading the standards for yourself.  Yes, they did some repainting of old cars.

Does it really matter if they call it an equation, or a math sentence, or a happy, hoppy, math bunny?  The question is "Do the standards work?".
 
2014-07-29 12:39:54 PM  
Don't farking care, we homeschool.  Common core doesn't matter.

/no we're not religious.
 
2014-07-29 12:41:18 PM  

Nabb1: Serious Black: Yes. I'm an asshole. You don't like it? Tough shiat.

As for the bolded comment, tons of people criticize others on issues regardless of a lack of experience. How many people here criticize someone's views on foreign policy when they themselves have not served overseas in the Departments of Defense or State? How many people criticize someone's views on health care policy when they themselves have never been employed as a doctor, a nurse, or in any part of the health care sector? How many people criticize business strategies when they themselves have never been the owner and/or CEO of a business? Are all of those people completely unqualified to make judgments in those arenas? I don't think so. Practical experience can be useful, but it's not a vaccine against criticism from others who aren't already invested.

Do you think you'll sway anyone by being belligerent because they don't agree with you? Or do you just enjoy belittling people on the internet?


I do have a giant boner right now.
 
2014-07-29 12:55:02 PM  

Two Dogs Farking: Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.

I wrote most of this this in the last thread on Common Core. I've updated it to reflect the passage of time and more recent experience.s

My son recently finished first grade at a school where they've adopted Common Core. They also have a big honking smart media board at the front of the classroom, which my son insists that they use to watch videos at least 10 minutes out of every hour..

Instead of spending their math lessons actually learning addition and subtraction, by writing numbers, they take most of their time filling in boxes with different colors. My son learned to count when he was 3 and could add single-digit numbers to form two-digit numbers when he was 4. We stopped practicing with him when he started his school lessons at age 6, and he actually forgot the simple addition because of all the distractions.

We now have him do math exercises at home for a half-hour every evening and his performance is back to where it was when he was 4.

Common Core is a set of standards and methods. Major elements of these methods are total bullshiat and not conducive to learning basic math and reading.


Your son forgot how to do basic addition?

The problem might be your son.
 
2014-07-29 12:55:15 PM  

serfdood: Don't farking care, we homeschool.  Common core doesn't matter.

/no we're not religious.


If you have to pass the new state tests (and don't most homeschoolers have to pass the state tests?), it matters, because the tests use the new terminology, and you'll want them to know those terms.

Granted, I object to the whole notion of standardized testing, but that is a different issue.
 
2014-07-29 01:03:21 PM  
Am I correct in believing that most of the anti-common core momentum comes from the right who hate it because it requires that kids learn actual science?

I listen to right wing radio in the car and the usual gang of conservatives all hate it with a fiery passion.
 
2014-07-29 01:08:36 PM  

meat0918: serfdood: Don't farking care, we homeschool.  Common core doesn't matter.

/no we're not religious.

If you have to pass the new state tests (and don't most homeschoolers have to pass the state tests?), it matters, because the tests use the new terminology, and you'll want them to know those terms.

Granted, I object to the whole notion of standardized testing, but that is a different issue.

 
I'm not sure what the requirement is on "passing" (I guess it's implied), but we do test him every year.  NC is fairly lax and many homeschoolers don't bother.  The stae legislature is working on scrapping Common Core and putting their own standards in place.  I don't agree with that, I think Common Core can be a good thing.  It's apparently widely misunderstood and greatly mistrusted, particularly in Red states (here).  I think the execution at the local level needs much work.

/okay, so maybe common core matters a little
 
2014-07-29 01:19:45 PM  

serfdood: meat0918: serfdood: Don't farking care, we homeschool.  Common core doesn't matter.

/no we're not religious.

If you have to pass the new state tests (and don't most homeschoolers have to pass the state tests?), it matters, because the tests use the new terminology, and you'll want them to know those terms.

Granted, I object to the whole notion of standardized testing, but that is a different issue.
 
I'm not sure what the requirement is on "passing" (I guess it's implied), but we do test him every year.  NC is fairly lax and many homeschoolers don't bother.  The stae legislature is working on scrapping Common Core and putting their own standards in place.  I don't agree with that, I think Common Core can be a good thing.  It's apparently widely misunderstood and greatly mistrusted, particularly in Red states (here).  I think the execution at the local level needs much work.

/okay, so maybe common core matters a little


What's funny about it being hated in Red States is that it was endorsed as a successful venture of a joint state and private sourced solution (i.e. no federal involvement) and touted by many Republicans as a panacea for education woes, at least until Arne Duncan and Obama got behind it, as well as some realizing national science standards were going to be part of the package eventually.
 
2014-07-29 01:21:05 PM  

Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.


I hate Common Core because it legally requires teaching how to abort the Non-Muslim babies under Sharia law during the war on Christmas.

/I think we should be aborting the non-Muslim babies all year long
 
2014-07-29 01:21:58 PM  

jst3p: Am I correct in believing that most of the anti-common core momentum comes from the right who hate it because it requires that kids learn actual science?

I listen to right wing radio in the car and the usual gang of conservatives all hate it with a fiery passion.


From what I've been reading for the last six months or so, the vast majority of the far-rightest who seem to complain the loudest and the hardest are convinced that Common Core was created as a way to introduce socialism to the kiddies and was funded and driven by George Soros and Bill Gates!  It's also another avenue for Obama to travel to force the federal govt onto the backs of the states and local school boards in another one of his massive power grabs!

The FACT that it was actually the creation of the National Governor's Association (with a predominantly Republican membership/leadership); along with the Council of Chief State School Officers and was a state/local driven effort is denied repeatedly by those "in the know" who have "studied it out."

I have discovered that it is impossible to convince them otherwise and that I am just a stupid dupe who can't see the conspiracy that is Common Core unfolding before my very eyes.  The fact the NGA's own website explains the reality of the situation has no impact on them, they are and will forever remain convinced that George Soros is hell-bent on immersing children in both a marxist and debil ridden system to turn all of our children into card carrying communists and to condemn them all to a life of serving Satan only to end up cast into the fiery lake on their deaths.

How can one even begin to have an intelligent conversation with people who are so convinced of such nonsense that no matter what evidence you can present to them they will find a way to ignore or dismiss it or in many cases claim it supports their version of reality?
 
2014-07-29 01:26:53 PM  

lawboy87: jst3p: Am I correct in believing that most of the anti-common core momentum comes from the right who hate it because it requires that kids learn actual science?

I listen to right wing radio in the car and the usual gang of conservatives all hate it with a fiery passion.

From what I've been reading for the last six months or so, the vast majority of the far-rightest who seem to complain the loudest and the hardest are convinced that Common Core was created as a way to introduce socialism to the kiddies and was funded and driven by George Soros and Bill Gates!  It's also another avenue for Obama to travel to force the federal govt onto the backs of the states and local school boards in another one of his massive power grabs!

The FACT that it was actually the creation of the National Governor's Association (with a predominantly Republican membership/leadership); along with the Council of Chief State School Officers and was a state/local driven effort is denied repeatedly by those "in the know" who have "studied it out."

I have discovered that it is impossible to convince them otherwise and that I am just a stupid dupe who can't see the conspiracy that is Common Core unfolding before my very eyes.  The fact the NGA's own website explains the reality of the situation has no impact on them, they are and will forever remain convinced that George Soros is hell-bent on immersing children in both a marxist and debil ridden system to turn all of our children into card carrying communists and to condemn them all to a life of serving Satan only to end up cast into the fiery lake on their deaths.

How can one even begin to have an intelligent conversation with people who are so convinced of such nonsense that no matter what evidence you can present to them they will find a way to ignore or dismiss it or in many cases claim it supports their version of reality?


www.theepochtimes.com

These might help.
 
2014-07-29 01:28:59 PM  
meat0918 it was endorsed as a successful venture of a joint state and private sourced solution (i.e. no federal involvement) and touted by many Republicans as a panacea for education woes,

That's the first bad sign.
 
2014-07-29 01:34:57 PM  

Ned Stark: meat0918 it was endorsed as a successful venture of a joint state and private sourced solution (i.e. no federal involvement) and touted by many Republicans as a panacea for education woes,

That's the first bad sign.


Normally I'd agree, but after reading the actual standards, aside from what I feel are silly nomenclature changes, they aren't bad standards.

Plus, the patchwork of education standards in this country is hurting our students.
 
2014-07-29 01:38:20 PM  

meat0918: Ned Stark: meat0918 it was endorsed as a successful venture of a joint state and private sourced solution (i.e. no federal involvement) and touted by many Republicans as a panacea for education woes,

That's the first bad sign.

Normally I'd agree, but after reading the actual standards, aside from what I feel are silly nomenclature changes, they aren't bad standards.

Plus, the patchwork of education standards in this country is hurting our students.


Bullshiat. Its "hurting" the bottom line of rich education industry vampires.
 
2014-07-29 01:39:24 PM  
I think you people are mistaking Common Core for Obamacore, which is what they are fighting in Alabama
 
2014-07-29 01:46:43 PM  

Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.


The Georgia Senate Race was a thing of joy on that front. Jack Kingston attacking David Perdue for supporting Obama's Common Core and Perdue firing back that he supported it back when it was simply a set of standards states set up among themselves but has since rejected and fought once Obama hijacked it and started using it to force big government propaganda down children's throats.
 
2014-07-29 02:03:21 PM  

Ned Stark: meat0918: Ned Stark: meat0918 it was endorsed as a successful venture of a joint state and private sourced solution (i.e. no federal involvement) and touted by many Republicans as a panacea for education woes,

That's the first bad sign.

Normally I'd agree, but after reading the actual standards, aside from what I feel are silly nomenclature changes, they aren't bad standards.

Plus, the patchwork of education standards in this country is hurting our students.

Bullshiat. Its "hurting" the bottom line of rich education industry vampires.


When you've got kids coming out of public school believing Jesus rode dinosaurs and T-Rex ate veggies before Adam at the apple, as well as can't read very well or do basic math or even do the basics of critical thinking, it's a farking problem.

Eliminating or restructuring those tests to be one as a senior instead of having them in 3rd, 5th, 8th and 11th grades would be great, but holy hell, we've got some problems that won't be solved by just changing or eliminating a test and restricting that sweet cash flow to testing conglomerates.
 
2014-07-29 02:15:47 PM  

GBB: And this is why I'm already planning out how I will be supplementing my unborn son's public school education with some at-home help.  My father did this with me and I did much better than my peers to the point he tried to get me to skip grades.


You should really do that regardless of how good your kids school is or how much you like the curriculum. It's hard to overstate the importance of parental involvement in a child's education.

Serious Black: Ten minutes of video or more every hour? Every day? I know it's been decades since I was in elementary school, but I don't remember that ever happening during my education. I think the more likely explanation for your kid's regression is that your son's teacher is terrible at their job.


A lot of the complaints about Common Core seem to come from teachers making bungled attempts to meet the new standards or going the route of 'teach to the test', so although it doesn't require any particular teaching methods it ends up causing some teachers to adopt sub-optimal methods. This is then coupled with changes in terminology and some tweaks to how things like math are taught that makes it harder for parents to compensate when their kid's teacher might not be implementing the standards well.
 
2014-07-29 02:21:48 PM  

Shostie: I'd just like to point out that you just spent nearly 500 words responding to a throwaway joke post.

lh3.googleusercontent.com

Well, that and to maybe head off the more bone stoopid in the crowd...
 
2014-07-29 02:34:55 PM  

1derful: Serious Black: Oh, it's time for another "I have no idea what Common Core is but I'm against it" thread! Joy to the world! I'm betting it will be no more than ten comments before somebody mistakenly says Common Core is a curriculum even though it is quite clearly a set of standards for what students should be able to do.

Requiring students to explain basic mathematical functions instead of only requiring them to correctly execute those functions is farking ridiculous, a waste of time, and is going to be a huge impediment to children as they work their way up to more complex higher maths.


This post is fascinating to me because I can't tell if it's genuine or a joke. I can actually see someone say this sort of stuff with the logic of "if they can't execute basic arithmetic how will they ever do harder forms of math?" completely ignoring that these elements are added to enhance an understanding of computation and not as a substitute. Understanding a mathematical function conceptually enough to explain it provides you with familiarity with how and why math functions work the way they do.

It's like the backlash against the "New Math". Yes, a lot of the attempts to introduce more advanced mathematical elements at a young age were rolled back due to public outcry. However at the end of the day growing up in the 80's I could see a lot of the underlying shift to set theory, an emphasis on word problems, and the first basics of algebra right out the gate challenged me to use abstract thinking over rote memorization in handling problems. That helps a hell of a lot more in higher math disciplines.
 
2014-07-29 02:57:54 PM  

Grungehamster: Yes, a lot of the attempts to introduce more advanced mathematical elements at a young age were rolled back due to public outcry.


The parallels are actually even more depressing: the outcry against "new math" was led by parents who thought of themselves as mathematically literate when in reality all they could do was four-function arithmetic on paper. When their students started coming home with assignments asking "is this binary operation associative?", the parents went on the warpath because they felt threatened. Same thing happens today, because the parents think "I can do math" means "I can follow directions", and when they see a problem asking "explain why this answer is wrong", their brain short-circuits.

Seriously: set theory ain't hard stuff.[1] Kids cotton onto that shiat like teriyaki on rice, and when you properly integrate it into the curriculum and provide opportunities to use the language of sets when talking about real-world situations, all of a sudden neat things start happening in little brains. The problem comes about when certain big brains have had their neat-things-module amputated.

[1] At least the topics you'd see at a grade-school level. Large cardinals and forcing are definitely hard stuff.
 
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