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(Slate)   New gag order in Fark's favorite state prevents doctors from warning patients about guns or asking them if they live in an unsafe environment where guns are present. And if those questions are asked, the doctors will lose their license   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Florida, medical licenses, swing states, National Rifle Association  
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2014-07-29 07:40:55 AM  
Just for a moment, put aside gun politics (yeah, I know how impossible that sounds here on Fark) and ask yourself if it might not be okay for a pediatrician who hears a depressed teenager mention that they've thought about shooting themselves to ask if there are any guns in their home, or suggest that the kid's parents might want to get them out of the home or secure them so the kid might not be able to carry that thought into action while they aren't thinking clearly.  Is that really so different from passing laws forbidding doctors to ask about, or advise parents about, keeping cats in the home where the kid has a serious allergy to cats to prevent PETA from taking away our freedom?  Will the chemical industry get to ban warning parents to store toxic chemicals where your kids can't get to them and poison themselves to stop the radical environmentalist agenda?

I've studied the Constitution for years and I have yet to find any protection of  the right to remain ignorant. I've seen where the right to remain silent comes from. but not to remain ignorant.  Someone must be distributing copies with a misprint in it.
 
2014-07-29 07:43:22 AM  
we need campaign finance reform so farking badly.
 
2014-07-29 07:45:03 AM  
But don't you dare let government get between a doctor and his patient.
 
2014-07-29 08:03:39 AM  
This is another one of those waste of money laws because it'll be automatically overturned.
 
2014-07-29 08:05:28 AM  
Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-07-29 08:12:06 AM  

stan unusual: Just for a moment, put aside gun politics (yeah, I know how impossible that sounds here on Fark) and ask yourself if it might not be okay for a pediatrician who hears a depressed teenager mention that they've thought about shooting themselves to ask if there are any guns in their home, or suggest that the kid's parents might want to get them out of the home or secure them so the kid might not be able to carry that thought into action while they aren't thinking clearly.  Is that really so different from passing laws forbidding doctors to ask about, or advise parents about, keeping cats in the home where the kid has a serious allergy to cats to prevent PETA from taking away our freedom?  Will the chemical industry get to ban warning parents to store toxic chemicals where your kids can't get to them and poison themselves to stop the radical environmentalist agenda?

I've studied the Constitution for years and I have yet to find any protection of  the right to remain ignorant. I've seen where the right to remain silent comes from. but not to remain ignorant.  Someone must be distributing copies with a misprint in it.


You need to read the Tea Party constitution.  Ignorance is not only a right, it's mandatory.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-07-29 08:13:32 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


Any time a patient is depressed, has violent urges or anything like that would be the obvious examples.
.
 
2014-07-29 08:13:58 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.
 
2014-07-29 08:17:45 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: This is another one of those waste of money laws because it'll be automatically overturned.


You must not have read down to the part where this has already been upheld by a federal appeals court.

I expect it will be reviewed en banc, but its far from certain the courts will strike the law down.
 
2014-07-29 08:20:07 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.


I'm not "deciding" anything. I don't care what a doctor and patient choose to talk about.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-07-29 08:24:24 AM  

gilgigamesh: cameroncrazy1984: This is another one of those waste of money laws because it'll be automatically overturned.

You must not have read down to the part where this has already been upheld by a federal appeals court.

I expect it will be reviewed en banc, but its far from certain the courts will strike the law down.


Judges are as partisan as anyone else.
 
2014-07-29 08:40:58 AM  

NutWrench: cameroncrazy1984: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.

I'm not "deciding" anything. I don't care what a doctor and patient choose to talk about.


Then why ask such a loaded questin?
 
2014-07-29 08:41:33 AM  
Question. Jeez!
 
2014-07-29 08:41:59 AM  
Wait, there are gun owners in Florida who DON'T tell everyone they meet about their guns?
 
2014-07-29 08:53:01 AM  

Speaker2Animals: NutWrench: cameroncrazy1984: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.

I'm not "deciding" anything. I don't care what a doctor and patient choose to talk about.

Then why ask such a loaded questin?


Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.
 
2014-07-29 08:57:09 AM  

NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.


The boobies nailed a completely plausible scenario. Patient: "I'm feeling very depressed, like shooting myself", Doctor: "Could you please tell me you're feeling like stabbing yourself instead so I can inquire about your knives?"
 
2014-07-29 09:05:27 AM  
cameroncrazy1984:
See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.

So much THIS.  People with no medical training whatsoever need to stop trying to tell doctors how to do their jobs.
 
2014-07-29 09:12:39 AM  
You can't trust doctors anyway.  They're all a bunch of elitists.  They think that their "training" and "education" and "credentials" allows them to dispense medical advice.

o.onionstatic.com
 
2014-07-29 09:12:41 AM  

flucto: NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.

The boobies nailed a completely plausible scenario. Patient: "I'm feeling very depressed, like shooting myself", Doctor: "Could you please tell me you're feeling like stabbing yourself instead so I can inquire about your knives?"


Except that scenario isn't covered by the law.

If the doctor has a reason to think the person might be danger to themselves or others, they can still bring up the subject.  What the law forbids is a general, routine, non-specific query.

From the law itself:

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.aspx?FileNa me =_h0155er.docx&DocumentType=Bill&BillNumber=0155&Session=2011

62 (2) A health care practitioner licensed under chapter 456 
63 or a health care facility licensed under chapter 395 shall 
64 respect a patient's right to privacy and should refrain from 
65 making a written inquiry or asking questions concerning the 
66 ownership of a firearm or ammunition by the patient or by a 
67 family member of the patient, or the presence of a firearm in a 
68 private home or other domicile of the patient or a family member 
69 of the patient. Notwithstanding this provision, a health care 
70 practitioner or health care facility that in good faith believes 
71 that this information is relevant to the patient's medical care 
72 or safety, or the safety of others, may make such a verbal or 
73 written inquiry.


I bolded the exception that covers your scenario.

 So if the doctor has some particularized concern due to things like depression, thoughts of suicide, etc., it's still perfectly kosher for them to ask.
 
2014-07-29 09:13:01 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


Treatment for depression perhaps ?
 
2014-07-29 09:14:09 AM  
A gun is NOT part of my body and has NOTHING to do with a doctor visit.
Does your mechanic ask questions about lawn care or indoor plumbing? NO!
 
2014-07-29 09:14:15 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


Maybe someone has seizures or other medical issues that might prevent them from safely handling a firearm?
 
2014-07-29 09:15:30 AM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

Treatment for depression perhaps ?


See my post above.  The law says that if there is a reason to think the person might be a danger to themselves or others, the doctors can ask about guns and ammunition and recommend courses of action.
 
2014-07-29 09:16:33 AM  
Correct me if I'm wrong but arn't Doctors licensed by a private entity?
 
2014-07-29 09:16:44 AM  

stan unusual: Just for a moment, put aside gun politics (yeah, I know how impossible that sounds here on Fark) and ask yourself if it might not be okay for a pediatrician who hears a depressed teenager mention that they've thought about shooting themselves to ask if there are any guns in their home, or suggest that the kid's parents might want to get them out of the home or secure them so the kid might not be able to carry that thought into action while they aren't thinking clearly.  Is that really so different from passing laws forbidding doctors to ask about, or advise parents about, keeping cats in the home where the kid has a serious allergy to cats to prevent PETA from taking away our freedom?  Will the chemical industry get to ban warning parents to store toxic chemicals where your kids can't get to them and poison themselves to stop the radical environmentalist agenda?

I've studied the Constitution for years and I have yet to find any protection of  the right to remain ignorant. I've seen where the right to remain silent comes from. but not to remain ignorant.  Someone must be distributing copies with a misprint in it.


I will grant you that, but where I see an actual problem is doctors asking a five year old, hearing there are guns, and sending the cops over only to find a toy on the carpet.   And then this happening over and over.   There should certainly be an exception where mental health is in question though.

I was actually the most surprised at the "extremely high number" of accidental shootings nationwide, which when I clicked the link said it was 259 since 1999.  That seems way lower than I thought.
 
2014-07-29 09:16:47 AM  

NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.


I think it's part of American Medical Association or American Pediatrics association standard questions, which generally ask about more medically relevant things. The act of asking reflects the politicization of those organizations, because they don't ask about swimming pools- something significantly more deadly. (going by the stats.)

That being said, I wouldn't support this law in my state, because of the reasons you state, and I have no problem telling the nurse/doctor 'no comment', and my wife has no problem just lying to them.
 
2014-07-29 09:17:33 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


Because people die as a result of an act involving a firearm pretty frequently. Accidents are one of the top ways kids die; many of those are the result of the accidental/negligent discharge of a firearm. Homicide is another of the top ways kids die; more than six in seven of these are the result of the discharge of a firearm. Suicide is another of the top ways kids die; about half of these are the result of the discharge of a firearm. Doctors, especially pediatricians, are trying to stop kids from dying.
 
2014-07-29 09:19:04 AM  
As a healthcare provider who is also an NRA member and all around gun-nutter, I can say that it is entirely appropriate to ask if guns are locked and out of reach of children in a medical encounter.  The genesis of the law is that the Am Pediatric Assoc position is that professionals should counsel patient's to get rid of guns, not lock them appropriately.  In other words the APA position is to use the bully-pulpit of the medical profession to politicize a medical visit as anti-gun.
 
2014-07-29 09:19:05 AM  

vpb: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

Any time a patient is depressed, has violent urges or anything like that would be the obvious examples.
.


Perhaps I might point out that your GP or pediatrician isn't trained/licensed as a mental health professional.    If you or someone you know is acting depressed or has violent urges, they need to see a LPC or a psychologist/psychiatrist.
 
2014-07-29 09:19:08 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

Maybe someone has seizures or other medical issues that might prevent them from safely handling a firearm?


See my post above.  The law says that if there is a reason to think the person might be a danger to themselves or others, the doctors can ask about guns and ammunition and recommend courses of action.

There is another scenario I can think of:  Person goes to the doctor, and blood work shows excessive levels of lead.  So the doctor inquires, finds out the guy molds his own bullets, and he does it inside in a room with poor ventilation.  Doctor would be fine under the law recommending that he either stop molding bullets, or do it outside or in an area with adequate ventilation (and that he wash his hands after handling the bullets and scrap lead).
 
2014-07-29 09:19:33 AM  

dittybopper: flucto: NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.

The boobies nailed a completely plausible scenario. Patient: "I'm feeling very depressed, like shooting myself", Doctor: "Could you please tell me you're feeling like stabbing yourself instead so I can inquire about your knives?"

Except that scenario isn't covered by the law.

If the doctor has a reason to think the person might be danger to themselves or others, they can still bring up the subject.  What the law forbids is a general, routine, non-specific query.

From the law itself:

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.aspx?FileNa me =_h0155er.docx&DocumentType=Bill&BillNumber=0155&Session=2011

62 (2) A health care practitioner licensed under chapter 456 
63 or a health care facility licensed under chapter 395 shall 
64 respect a patient's right to privacy and should refrain from 
65 making a written inquiry or asking questions concerning the 
66 ownership of a firearm or ammunition by the patient or by a 
67 family member of the patient, or the presence of a firearm in a 
68 private home or other domicile of the patient or a family member 
69 of the patient. Notwithstanding this provision, a health care 
70 practitioner or health care facility that in good faith believes 
71 that this information is relevant to the patient's medical care 
72 or safety, or the safety of others, may make such a verbal or 
73 written inquiry.

I bolded the exception that covers your scenario.

 So if the doctor has some particularized concern due to things like depression, thoughts of suicide, etc., it's still perfectly kosher for them to ask.


Sixty-four says they should refrain form inquiry. So does that's ban discussion about guns or does it mean they would like you to not mention them
 
2014-07-29 09:20:22 AM  

cameroncrazy1984: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

See the above mention. And who are YOU to decide what a doctor gets to ask a patient? You're not a physician OR a board of physicians. Neither is the Florida legislature.



And what harm is this trying to prevent?  If you're a gun nut already, you're free to be offended because reasons if your doctor asks you about guns, and then find a different, freedom loving doctor.  It's one of the most farking absurd laws I've ever heard of.
 
2014-07-29 09:21:17 AM  
What if the patient comes in wearing this t-shirt?...

i1.cpcache.com

/a hot item?
 
2014-07-29 09:21:30 AM  

dittybopper: If the doctor has a reason to think the person might be danger to themselves or others, they can still bring up the subject. What the law forbids is a general, routine, non-specific query.

From the law itself:

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.aspx?FileNa me =_h0155er.docx&DocumentType=Bill&BillNumber=0155&Session=2011

62 (2) A health care practitioner licensed under chapter 456
63 or a health care facility licensed under chapter 395 shall
64 respect a patient's right to privacy and should refrain from
65 making a written inquiry or asking questions concerning the
66 ownership of a firearm or ammunition by the patient or by a
67 family member of the patient, or the presence of a firearm in a
68 private home or other domicile of the patient or a family member
69 of the patient. Notwithstanding this provision, a health care
70 practitioner or health care facility that in good faith believes
71 that this information is relevant to the patient's medical care
72 or safety, or the safety of others, may make such a verbal or
73 written inquiry.

I bolded the exception that covers your scenario.

So if the doctor has some particularized concern due to things like depression, thoughts of suicide, etc., it's still perfectly kosher for them to ask.


OK, so my scenario is wrong. But you're not defending this moronic law are you? You know it will never stand right?
 
2014-07-29 09:21:52 AM  

jehovahs witness protection: A gun is NOT part of my body and has NOTHING to do with a doctor visit.
Does your mechanic ask questions about lawn care or indoor plumbing? NO!



So you think there should be a law that if a mechanic asks a customer about lawn care or indoor plumbing, he loses his license?  That is the retarded argument you are making.
 
2014-07-29 09:22:41 AM  
AMURIKAAAAAAAAAAAA
 
2014-07-29 09:22:44 AM  

jehovahs witness protection: A gun is NOT part of my body and has NOTHING to do with a doctor visit.


Congratulations, you have won the price for saying the stupidest thing on Fark ever coontil someone else comes along in the next 5 minutes).

I wonder what your conversation with your doctor looks like when you have a foreign object stuck, say, a knife, stuck in your leg.
 
2014-07-29 09:22:45 AM  
So much for the conservative Free Market, Small Business stance and Corporations are People!
 
2014-07-29 09:24:08 AM  

dittybopper: flucto: NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.

The boobies nailed a completely plausible scenario. Patient: "I'm feeling very depressed, like shooting myself", Doctor: "Could you please tell me you're feeling like stabbing yourself instead so I can inquire about your knives?"

Except that scenario isn't covered by the law.

If the doctor has a reason to think the person might be danger to themselves or others, they can still bring up the subject.  What the law forbids is a general, routine, non-specific query.

From the law itself:

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.aspx?FileNa me =_h0155er.docx&DocumentType=Bill&BillNumber=0155&Session=2011

62 (2) A health care practitioner licensed under chapter 456 
63 or a health care facility licensed under chapter 395 shall 
64 respect a patient's right to privacy and should refrain from 
65 making a written inquiry or asking questions concerning the 
66 ownership of a firearm or ammunition by the patient or by a 
67 family member of the patient, or the presence of a firearm in a 
68 private home or other domicile of the patient or a family member 
69 of the patient. Notwithstanding this provision, a health care 
70 practitioner or health care facility that in good faith believes 
71 that this information is relevant to the patient's medical care 
72 or safety, or the safety of others, may make such a verbal or 
73 written inquiry.

I bolded the exception that covers your scenario.

 So if the doctor has some particularized concern due to things like depression, thoughts of suic ...



You still haven't explained how or why this law is at all necessary or appropriate.

For a group of people that are absolutely terrified of government overreaching, the gun nuts sure do love it when the government overreaches on behalf of the NRA.
 
2014-07-29 09:24:20 AM  

stan unusual: Just for a moment, put aside gun politics (yeah, I know how impossible that sounds here on Fark) and ask yourself if it might not be okay for a pediatrician who hears a depressed teenager mention that they've thought about shooting themselves to ask if there are any guns in their home, or suggest that the kid's parents might want to get them out of the home or secure them so the kid might not be able to carry that thought into action while they aren't thinking clearly.  Is that really so different from passing laws forbidding doctors to ask about, or advise parents about, keeping cats in the home where the kid has a serious allergy to cats to prevent PETA from taking away our freedom?  Will the chemical industry get to ban warning parents to store toxic chemicals where your kids can't get to them and poison themselves to stop the radical environmentalist agenda?

I've studied the Constitution for years and I have yet to find any protection of  the right to remain ignorant. I've seen where the right to remain silent comes from. but not to remain ignorant.  Someone must be distributing copies with a misprint in it.


A family acquaintance of ours wanted to quit smoking.  He was a very quiet, low key guy.  Very kind.  He got a prescription for a drug that helps the nicotine cravings.  One evening he had his brother over and came out of the bathroom very angry and his rants forced his brother and girlfriend out of the apartment.  About an hour later he shot himself.

I hear, "Ask your doctor about <insert drug name here>" on plenty of medicines advertised on TV that include "thoughts of suicide" as a side effect.  If "thoughts of suicide" is a side effect of a legitimate prescription medicine then it is reasonable for a doctor to discuss weapons with his patients.
 
2014-07-29 09:24:36 AM  

NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?


Because doctors are also concerned with preventing illness and injury.  This is why they ask about your lifestyle with questions about your diet, sexual health, wearing a seat belt when driving, etc.  If they find the patient lacks information, they can provide it.  They ask about guns in the home to help ensure that fewer people are accidentally injured or killed by them by providing safety information if it seems warranted.
 
2014-07-29 09:24:53 AM  
Here in the peoples republic of NY doctors force you to fill out a form when you take your kids in for a check-up.  They ask all kinds of non medical questions.  I see it similar to an accountant asking about your sex life.  I filled out only the parts where it had even the slightest bit to due with health.  The doctor came in to the exam room with the form 1/4 filled out and told me essentially that if I did not complete the form that it would flag a visit from social services.  I cant see how in America this is considered freedom.  I have been charged with no crime yet forced to answer to the state.  How liberals are for this is beyond my comprehension.
 
2014-07-29 09:24:53 AM  

CruJones: I will grant you that, but where I see an actual problem is doctors asking a five year old, hearing there are guns, and sending the cops over only to find a toy on the carpet.   And then this happening over and over.


Happening over and over? In that case, it must be really easy for you to cite two or three cases of this happening in Florida.

Because I'm sure this isn't a case of "the party of small government" writing a law to control the actions of private citizens (unless you're at the VA, the doctor is a private citizen in private practice) just because they like imposing their opinion with the full force of government.

Can't wait to see the cites (at least 2 from Florida should be easy since it keeps happening "over and over).

/It is Florida after all, maybe there is more than derp motivating this law
 
2014-07-29 09:25:38 AM  

dittybopper: flucto: NutWrench: Perhaps I've led a relatively sheltered life but I'm genuinely curious how a doctor would bring up the subject of *firearms* in the course of a normal encounter. Has this been a problem requiring legislation? I don't own guns myself because they're freaking dangerous. I also don't care about people who DO own guns as long as they use them responsibly. I also despise politicians who try to crowbar themselves into a confidential doctor-patient relationship.

The boobies nailed a completely plausible scenario. Patient: "I'm feeling very depressed, like shooting myself", Doctor: "Could you please tell me you're feeling like stabbing yourself instead so I can inquire about your knives?"

Except that scenario isn't covered by the law.

If the doctor has a reason to think the person might be danger to themselves or others, they can still bring up the subject.  What the law forbids is a general, routine, non-specific query.

From the law itself:

http://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Documents/loaddoc.aspx?FileNa me =_h0155er.docx&DocumentType=Bill&BillNumber=0155&Session=2011

62 (2) A health care practitioner licensed under chapter 456 
63 or a health care facility licensed under chapter 395 shall 
64 respect a patient's right to privacy and should refrain from 
65 making a written inquiry or asking questions concerning the 
66 ownership of a firearm or ammunition by the patient or by a 
67 family member of the patient, or the presence of a firearm in a 
68 private home or other domicile of the patient or a family member 
69 of the patient. Notwithstanding this provision, a health care 
70 practitioner or health care facility that in good faith believes 
71 that this information is relevant to the patient's medical care 
72 or safety, or the safety of others, may make such a verbal or 
73 written inquiry.

I bolded the exception that covers your scenario.

 So if the doctor has some particularized concern due to things like depression, thoughts of suic ...


Doesn't the part you bolded kind of make this legislation completely pointless? I'm interpreting it as "You can't do X, unless you think you should do X."
 
2014-07-29 09:26:18 AM  
I've never had my doctor mention a gun.  Seems like an odd thing; must have been something that was coming up often enough in Florida for the legislators to make a law about it.
 
2014-07-29 09:26:23 AM  

CruJones: I will grant you that, but where I see an actual problem is doctors asking a five year old, hearing there are guns, and sending the cops over only to find a toy on the carpet.


That would not happen due to HIPAA privacy laws.
 
2014-07-29 09:28:31 AM  

Muta: CruJones: I will grant you that, but where I see an actual problem is doctors asking a five year old, hearing there are guns, and sending the cops over only to find a toy on the carpet.

That would not happen due to HIPAA privacy laws.


LOLWUT? Disclosure to Law Enforcement Personnel is such a large HIPAA exception that it has its own section.

http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/faq/disclosures_for_law_enforce me nt_purposes/505.html
 
2014-07-29 09:28:47 AM  

Serious Black: NutWrench: Unless the patient's injury is gun-related, why should the topic of guns ever come up in a medical encounter?

Because people die as a result of an act involving a firearm pretty frequently. Accidents are one of the top ways kids die; many of those are the result of the accidental/negligent discharge of a firearm. Homicide is another of the top ways kids die; more than six in seven of these are the result of the discharge of a firearm. Suicide is another of the top ways kids die; about half of these are the result of the discharge of a firearm. Doctors, especially pediatricians, are trying to stop kids from dying.


Very, very few kids die as a result of firearms accidents in any one year.

According to the CDC, the number of kids under 12 who died in firearms accidents in 2011 (last year they have data online for) was 51 out of a population of almost 49 million.  That's literally "One in a Million" odds, or close enough.  Compare that to the 1,062 who died in motor vehicle related accidents that year, a rate that is 21 times higher.

I put the cut-off at under 12 because most states you can get a hunting license by then, which obviously increases the risk somewhat, but even then, if you go with 17 and under, the odds only go up to 1.4 per million (102 deaths in a population of nearly 74 million kids).  For the same population, the motor vehicle deaths were 2,571, and the rate 34.8 per million.

Source:   http://webappa.cdc.gov/sasweb/ncipc/mortrate10_us.html
 
2014-07-29 09:29:01 AM  

huckleberg: The genesis of the law is that the Am Pediatric Assoc position is that professionals should counsel patient's to get rid of guns, not lock them appropriately.  In other words the APA position is to use the bully-pulpit of the medical profession to politicize a medical visit as anti-gun.


So what? Doctors are private citizens in private practice. If you don't like your doctor, change doctors. It's farking Florida - if there was a big problem with anti-gun doctors I'd expect the NRA to roll out a certification program for 'friendlies'.

Why does the government have to roll in it's monopoly of force to gag a private citizen acting in performance of their duties? To look at the left side of things, pharmacists have been required to sell the morning after pill, but there is no law against them telling anyone buying it they'll go to hell.
 
2014-07-29 09:29:42 AM  

Muta: CruJones: I will grant you that, but where I see an actual problem is doctors asking a five year old, hearing there are guns, and sending the cops over only to find a toy on the carpet.

That would not happen due to HIPAA privacy laws.


OK, but what about a scenario where a kid talks about liking guns so Barack Hussein Obama personally straps on his jackboots and leads an armed raid by helicopter on my gun club and forcibly takes my guns all while cackling maniacally like he's better than me.

And then this happening over and over.
 
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