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(CBS News)   Lawn chemicals can stay in the human body for decades. At least when you die you'll have a lush, weed free grave site   (cbsnews.com) divider line 54
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1644 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Jul 2014 at 11:14 AM (12 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-29 09:23:56 AM  
But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

"There are so many hundreds of things more dangerous in everyday life than this that it is not even worth thinking about," Bloom said.


I don't want to wade too deeply into the science, but those two statements are not equivalent.

"No risk" is not the same as "it could be worse."
 
2014-07-29 09:31:51 AM  
I don't really give a fark how long they stay until I know whether they're bad/how bad they are.
 
2014-07-29 09:36:39 AM  
The most common chemicals used are glyphosate 2, 4-D

It works in both space AND TIME!!!
 
2014-07-29 11:23:26 AM  
Just wait until it rains significantly, then you're good to go on the lawn. Common sense and its printed on whatever herbicide/fertilizer you're using.
 
2014-07-29 11:28:20 AM  
I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...
 
2014-07-29 11:28:49 AM  

Diogenes: But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

"There are so many hundreds of things more dangerous in everyday life than this that it is not even worth thinking about," Bloom said.

I don't want to wade too deeply into the science, but those two statements are not equivalent.

"No risk" is not the same as "it could be worse."


Not really. He is saying there is no risk because they've been around for 60 years and there's been no side effects, so why worry?
 
2014-07-29 11:29:41 AM  

RedTank: I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...


When I was a kid, one of the neighborhood kids would eat grass. He did seem kind of off, now that I think about it
 
2014-07-29 11:32:00 AM  
What's next? Will these eggheads be telling us that we shouldn't eat food soaked in these chemicals either?

I've mostly moved to an all organic lawn care program myself. The only chemicals I use are some spot treatments for weed grasses and I think I can eliminate that once my lawn is really thriving.(bought the house 2 years ago).

The recipe I use is BLS soil conditioner from the around the yard forums if anyone is curious. The idea is that it feeds the microorganisms which in turn naturally fertilize your lawn. So far so good.

RedTank: I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...


Breathing, and through skin contact I'd wager.
 
2014-07-29 11:32:02 AM  

machoprogrammer: When I was a kid, one of the neighborhood kids would eat grass. He did seem kind of off, now that I think about it


The question still remains was he off because he ate grass or was he off so he ate grass.
 
2014-07-29 11:34:43 AM  
Sure. They stay in my body for decades, but I have to reapply them to the lawn every month. What the hell?
 
2014-07-29 11:36:55 AM  

nocturnal001: Breathing, and through skin contact I'd wager.


Should I not have filled my electric lawn fountain and kiddy pool with weed killer?  Was that wrong?
 
2014-07-29 11:37:58 AM  
www.motherjones.com
There is nothing to worry about.
 
2014-07-29 11:38:54 AM  
"Older pesticides like DDT can stay in the human body for years, even decades," Landrigan said.

<rolleyes>

I'd better be careful then. That DDT truck rolls through the neighborhood every day.

/eagerly awaits "Is your home older than 50 years? YOUR SIDING AND INSULATION WILL GIVE YOU CANCER"
 
2014-07-29 11:40:21 AM  
Is it at near homeopathic levels of detection?  I say near, because the whole point of homeopathic crap is there is nothing of the original left and the rest is magic.  I don't really care if I have a few molecules of DDT or glyphosate well so far below the levels of harm as to be nigh undetectable.

Although hearing stories from my boomer aunts and uncles and other extended family (large Catholic farming family) used to ride their bikes through the DDT fog pretending to be flying through the clouds could explain a few things about their behavior.

That said, I know that old habits die hard.

I've got neighbors that brag about using the agricultural use only pesticides (i.e. banned for residential use) on their lawns for crane flies, and know someone that used a potent termite treatment on his ash trees to save them from emerald ash borer.

I'm actually more concerned about some residential yahoo over spraying his lawn and trees then I am about a farmer.  It costs a farmer a hell of lot more money to spray and that eats into his profits, so he has an incentive to do it right, while Mr. Cavalier Neighbor mixes his water and pesticide, and then sprays, and if he still sees the problem sprays again, and again, and again, and again, even when the label says to limit the spraying.
 
2014-07-29 11:45:34 AM  

nocturnal001: What's next? Will these eggheads be telling us that we shouldn't eat food soaked in these chemicals either?

I've mostly moved to an all organic lawn care program myself. The only chemicals I use are some spot treatments for weed grasses and I think I can eliminate that once my lawn is really thriving.(bought the house 2 years ago).

The recipe I use is BLS soil conditioner from the around the yard forums if anyone is curious. The idea is that it feeds the microorganisms which in turn naturally fertilize your lawn. So far so good.

RedTank: I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...

Breathing, and through skin contact I'd wager.


I've gone organic except for spot treatment (grass in cracks on driveway etc). Wife would never let me use fertilizer and I used to whine, now I recognize that going organic is a great excuse not to worry if your lawn looks lousy.

Yeah I have dandelions and crabgrass! I'm also not adding any chemicals to your groundwater. You're welcome.
 
2014-07-29 11:48:30 AM  

nocturnal001: What's next? Will these eggheads be telling us that we shouldn't eat food soaked in these chemicals either?

I've mostly moved to an all organic lawn care program myself. The only chemicals I use are some spot treatments for weed grasses and I think I can eliminate that once my lawn is really thriving.(bought the house 2 years ago).

The recipe I use is BLS soil conditioner from the around the yard forums if anyone is curious. The idea is that it feeds the microorganisms which in turn naturally fertilize your lawn. So far so good.


Mostly what we've done. Except in the front yard I'm going to have to tear out down to about 2-3 inches because the former owners LEFT LANDSCAPING FABRIC UNDER THE SOD and it's so bad the parts I have already torn out had the grass roots form a mat that was patterned to the landscaping fabric and there is no dirt, I don't know how it survives.

It looks great in the winter, but come summer it gets really, really dry here.  The only reason it gets any water at all is because we have fruit and veggies in the front yard and I utilize the sprinkler system the former owner put in.  I can tell were I need to dig though because the parts with the fabric brown despite any level of watering.

Worse than the landscaping fabric is I've also found that plastic stuff in places.  They just dumped dirt over the plastic and planted grass...  It's so farking infuriating.
 
2014-07-29 11:49:43 AM  
I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.
 
2014-07-29 11:53:45 AM  

Debeo Summa Credo: nocturnal001: What's next? Will these eggheads be telling us that we shouldn't eat food soaked in these chemicals either?

I've mostly moved to an all organic lawn care program myself. The only chemicals I use are some spot treatments for weed grasses and I think I can eliminate that once my lawn is really thriving.(bought the house 2 years ago).

The recipe I use is BLS soil conditioner from the around the yard forums if anyone is curious. The idea is that it feeds the microorganisms which in turn naturally fertilize your lawn. So far so good.

RedTank: I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...

Breathing, and through skin contact I'd wager.

I've gone organic except for spot treatment (grass in cracks on driveway etc). Wife would never let me use fertilizer and I used to whine, now I recognize that going organic is a great excuse not to worry if your lawn looks lousy.

Yeah I have dandelions and crabgrass! I'm also not adding any chemicals to your groundwater. You're welcome.


Since your lawn is organic rid it of dandelions by having a salad. The leaves are quite tasty. The blossoms make excellent jelly. Even the root is usable. It makes an excellent coffee replacement.
 
2014-07-29 12:00:28 PM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.


On the practical side, it can often cool down the area by around 5 degrees.  Which is nice on hot days.  It is also typically cleaner as the kids and pets bring in less dirt/mud.
 
2014-07-29 12:01:29 PM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.


I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.
 
2014-07-29 12:04:07 PM  

meat0918: nocturnal001: What's next? Will these eggheads be telling us that we shouldn't eat food soaked in these chemicals either?

I've mostly moved to an all organic lawn care program myself. The only chemicals I use are some spot treatments for weed grasses and I think I can eliminate that once my lawn is really thriving.(bought the house 2 years ago).

The recipe I use is BLS soil conditioner from the around the yard forums if anyone is curious. The idea is that it feeds the microorganisms which in turn naturally fertilize your lawn. So far so good.

Mostly what we've done. Except in the front yard I'm going to have to tear out down to about 2-3 inches because the former owners LEFT LANDSCAPING FABRIC UNDER THE SOD and it's so bad the parts I have already torn out had the grass roots form a mat that was patterned to the landscaping fabric and there is no dirt, I don't know how it survives.

It looks great in the winter, but come summer it gets really, really dry here.  The only reason it gets any water at all is because we have fruit and veggies in the front yard and I utilize the sprinkler system the former owner put in.  I can tell were I need to dig though because the parts with the fabric brown despite any level of watering.

Worse than the landscaping fabric is I've also found that plastic stuff in places.  They just dumped dirt over the plastic and planted grass...  It's so farking infuriating.


I have some of the plastic crap in a few planting beds, Horrible stuff, doesn't let anything breath and never degrades.
 
2014-07-29 12:05:55 PM  

Diogenes: But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

"There are so many hundreds of things more dangerous in everyday life than this that it is not even worth thinking about," Bloom said.

I don't want to wade too deeply into the science, but those two statements are not equivalent.

"No risk" is not the same as "it could be worse."


Do you like eating rice grown in America? Hey, how does all that arsenic that used to be used in cotton fields that were turned into rice fields? Nummy nummy arsenic. One of the best carcinogens around. USA USA USA.
 
2014-07-29 12:16:45 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.


I'm sure it is. It can also increase your homes value. Growing up my parents and grandparents didn't care about the yard grass. I'm not saying it wasn't mowed but watering and spraying wasn't done. The grass that was important to them was in the pastures and hay fields.
 
2014-07-29 12:18:28 PM  

RedTank: I don't really understand how lawn chemicals are getting into people's bodies? Are people eating their grass and chewing on mulch?

/I assume I should read the article...



www.webanswers.com
 
2014-07-29 12:23:14 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Diogenes: But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

"There are so many hundreds of things more dangerous in everyday life than this that it is not even worth thinking about," Bloom said.

I don't want to wade too deeply into the science, but those two statements are not equivalent.

"No risk" is not the same as "it could be worse."

Do you like eating rice grown in America? Hey, how does all that arsenic that used to be used in cotton fields that were turned into rice fields? Nummy nummy arsenic. One of the best carcinogens around. USA USA USA.


Rice was an important plantation crop in the south long before cotton became king. Plus most of American rice is from California not the south. Rice has not replaced cotton. If anything has it's corn.
 
2014-07-29 12:26:57 PM  

sowthepole: [www.webanswers.com image 500x306]


Oh good, now I get it.

....

So people aren't treating chemicals as hazardous then?  I should have reprhased, I don't know how intelligent people are getting chemicals into their bodies.
 
2014-07-29 12:31:56 PM  

RedTank: nocturnal001: Breathing, and through skin contact I'd wager.

Should I not have filled my electric lawn fountain and kiddy pool with weed killer?  Was that wrong?


Depends, is the kiddy pool for your family or to rid your neighborhood of kids?
 
2014-07-29 12:40:49 PM  

RedTank: sowthepole: [www.webanswers.com image 500x306]

Oh good, now I get it.

....

So people aren't treating chemicals as hazardous then?  I should have reprhased, I don't know how intelligent people are getting chemicals into their bodies.


You would be fairly surprised. I have what I would consider a fairly intelligent friend, we were visiting and staying at his home as we do once a year. We woke one morning to the distinct smell of herbicide, and found someone spraying the whole yard, about an acre. We were working remote, had our son and dog with us, so our only real option was to let them run around in the yard all day while we worked on the patio. We realized that morning we no longer had that luxury, so we decide to end our working vacation and head home.

I called my friend and let him know we were leaving, that they were spraying poison on the lawn and we wouldn't be sticking around to let our kids play on it. He mentioned that the stuff they were spraying was kid and pet safe. I said, please, with all due respect, its pill bug poison, and weed herbicide...Its the farthest thing from child and pet safe.

He had just lost his 5 year old dog to Lymphoma, his female had lost two litters and had to have her reproductive organs removed, and has had a cyst on her back for the last year. I know correlation is not causation, but its farking poison. Oh, he had just went to get a new puppy that day. I shutter to think he let him run and roll and play all over that grass that day.

He is a bright guy, honestly.
 
2014-07-29 12:42:54 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.


As long as it is St. Augustine grass, I'll tell you what

img4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-29 12:56:20 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Do you like eating rice grown in America? Hey, how does all that arsenic that used to be used in cotton fields that were turned into rice fields? Nummy nummy arsenic. One of the best carcinogens around. USA USA USA.


Arsenic is everywhere in the ground.  Not just in rice fields.  It is a naturally occurring element and can be found in corn fields, wheat fields, soybean fields, and pretty much any other type of field you could imagine.
 
2014-07-29 01:15:01 PM  

HeadLever: n America? Hey, how does all that arsenic that used to be used in cotton fields that were turned into rice fields? Nummy nummy arsenic. One of the best carcinogens around. USA USA USA.


I think the point they were trying to make was - Cotton field use arsenic as a pesticide, rice has a high absorption rate of arsenic. Former cotton fields in the south have been re-purposed to rice fields. This combo might be a bad thing. What would need to be known is, does rice absorb arsenic at a specific rate, regardless of levels in the soil. Or, does the absorption rate increase as level in the soil increase.
 
2014-07-29 01:15:23 PM  

Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.


Emulation of the wealthy is a powerful drug.

A perfect lawn? It means you're wealthy enough to waste a hell of a lot of time, energy, and money growing something just for show.

And I say that as someone that has had to strike a deal to keep some lawn in the front yard as a reassurance they don't have (extremely) crazy people living next to them.

At least people love the flowers and berries (most are edible or have edible parts).  I keep telling the wife we're lucky we haven't gotten an abatement notice, but she says the "ornamental grass" is probably exempt.

i457.photobucket.com

The poor rosemary barely survived this winter.  It got the coldest it's been in 40 years (-9 one day). In addition to the rosemary you have oregano, sage, a table grape, hops in the back there, then near the bird bath is winter savory, with rhubarb behind it.  I have some lilies I am babying and are my responsibility.

i457.photobucket.com

That's a mini-swale and beetle bank and what I'm amazed no one has complained about in the front there planted with native grasses and an elderberry bush in the back. It's a bit taller now.  They are pretty, for grass.  There are a lot of native wildflowers there too, and the bees love them.  More sage, and some broccoli and artichokes that need some fertilizer or replanting or something.  That's asparagus behind it all on the left, and in the back some more winter savory too in front of the rose bushes.  I think there is a dwarf quince in there too in the middle bed, we lost the small fig tree and a dwarf cherry tree not visible to the winter cold this year.

//Ok, maybe we are extremely crazy people, but I'm ok with that.
 
2014-07-29 01:25:22 PM  

sowthepole: I think the point they were trying to make was - Cotton field use arsenic as a pesticide, rice has a high absorption rate of arsenic. Former cotton fields in the south have been re-purposed to rice fields. This combo might be a bad thing. What would need to be known is, does rice absorb arsenic at a specific rate, regardless of levels in the soil. Or, does the absorption rate increase as level in the soil increase.


Ah, I see.

Yeah, without knowing if the old pesticides have spiked arsenic concentrations in the soil and what the uptake rates are for rice, this may or may not be a problem.
 
2014-07-29 01:27:39 PM  
Hmmm. A chemical staying in the body for a long time isn't indicative of any harm. Your body is already full of, and made of, chemicals. Let's check the article because *surely* they wouldn't just be trying to cause panic to get clicks; they must have some real science in there.

But some doctors are becoming more concerned

Uh oh, not off to a good start. Some doctors? Awfully unspecific.

You always have to protect yourself when you're using any chemicals

Really? What's the protection for H20? How about the C they come in contact with? Not to mention the copious amounts of N. I hope they do better in this article than the luddite "OMG CHEMICALS ARE SCARY" garbage.

The doctor insists that some pesticides can stay in your system for years. "Older pesticides like DDT can stay in the human body for years, even decades," Landrigan said.

Wait, the dangerous chemical that can linger for years is DDT? Well no farking shiat. What next, "Construction Materials Can Kill You" article that says "asbestos is bad."? We don't use DDT anymore. It's farking banned. There's no reason to try and work people up over "dangerous lawn chemicals" by citing DDT. Christ what a waste of time.
 
2014-07-29 01:29:17 PM  
my late grandfather used to buy chlordane in jersey after it was banned in ny
 
2014-07-29 01:33:30 PM  
Well shiat. We were out a few nights ago and drunk as hell, so it was time to go wander over to the grass and lie down in it. Staring up at the streetlights because you can't see the stars.

I looked over and there was a poison sign stuck in the grass. WTF. It's a public park in the middle of a bunch of bars! Obviously drunk people will come and lay down on it.

Do I have contagious grass cancer for the rest of my life now?
 
2014-07-29 01:40:08 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: Well shiat. We were out a few nights ago and drunk as hell, so it was time to go wander over to the grass and lie down in it. Staring up at the streetlights because you can't see the stars.

I looked over and there was a poison sign stuck in the grass. WTF. It's a public park in the middle of a bunch of bars! Obviously drunk people will come and lay down on it.

Do I have contagious grass cancer for the rest of my life now?


You will have grass herpes.
 
2014-07-29 02:07:42 PM  
A good lawn is surely better than a field of kale to park a car or motorcycle on.   Freshly cut and trimmed with a massive live oak and roses to accent it.
 
2014-07-29 03:12:42 PM  

xanadian: The most common chemicals used are glyphosate 2, 4-D

It works in both space AND TIME!!!


That's why it stays in the body so long.
 
2014-07-29 04:22:49 PM  

Diogenes: But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

"There are so many hundreds of things more dangerous in everyday life than this that it is not even worth thinking about," Bloom said.

I don't want to wade too deeply into the science, but those two statements are not equivalent.

"No risk" is not the same as "it could be worse."


I'd say "no risk" definitely means "it could be worse". You know, going from "no risk" to "some risk", even if it's a miniscule one.
 
2014-07-29 04:49:54 PM  
But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

Phony industry shill front - study it out
 
2014-07-29 05:23:21 PM  

dryknife: But Dr. Josh Bloom of the American Council of Science and Health says these chemicals have been used in the U.S. for at least 60 years and pose no risk.

Phony industry shill front - study it out


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Council_on_Science_and_Health

You don't really have to study it out.  It's pretty clear that they're shills.
 
2014-07-29 05:56:44 PM  

RedTank: machoprogrammer: When I was a kid, one of the neighborhood kids would eat grass. He did seem kind of off, now that I think about it

The question still remains was he off because he ate grass or was he off so he ate grass.


Maybe he was actually a dog and his stomach hurt.
 
2014-07-29 07:09:54 PM  
Glyphosate on lawns doesn't make sense (being non-selective).  Who uses that on lawns?

Permethren and 2,4-D yes.
 
2014-07-29 07:48:20 PM  

meat0918: I'm actually more concerned about some residential yahoo over spraying his lawn and trees then I am about a farmer


You should be. Lawns tend to be significantly more over treated than agricultural lands in part because the economics don't prohibit it (since lawns are a 100% losing proposition economically). Whether or not that's actually dangerous (to people and/or the environment) is less clear, but at the very least it's wasteful.
 
2014-07-29 08:13:53 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.


The people who last owned my house let Canadian thistles take over the back yard. That battle - war, actually - has been ongoing now for seven years.

I hope those people, wherever the hell they are now, fall face first and naked into a giant patch of thistles.
 
2014-07-29 08:33:46 PM  
Noted. Next time the DDT plane flies over my neighborhood, I'll be sure and hold my breath.

El Dudereno: Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.

The people who last owned my house let Canadian thistles take over the back yard. That battle - war, actually - has been ongoing now for seven years.

I hope those people, wherever the hell they are now, fall face first and naked into a giant patch of thistles.


Have you tried salt water?
 
2014-07-29 08:40:48 PM  

MJMaloney187: Noted. Next time the DDT plane flies over my neighborhood, I'll be sure and hold my breath.

El Dudereno: Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.

The people who last owned my house let Canadian thistles take over the back yard. That battle - war, actually - has been ongoing now for seven years.

I hope those people, wherever the hell they are now, fall face first and naked into a giant patch of thistles.

Have you tried salt water?


I'll try anything.

I'm considering agent orange.
 
2014-07-29 10:04:00 PM  
Life would be so much easier if everyone just decided that dandelions and crabgrass were attractive.
 
2014-07-30 05:30:20 AM  

El Dudereno: MJMaloney187: Noted. Next time the DDT plane flies over my neighborhood, I'll be sure and hold my breath.

El Dudereno: Tobin_Lam: Land_of_the_Magic_Dragon: I will never understand the love affair with lawns we have in America.

I guess you've never had a good one. A nice lawn is a wonderful thing.

The people who last owned my house let Canadian thistles take over the back yard. That battle - war, actually - has been ongoing now for seven years.

I hope those people, wherever the hell they are now, fall face first and naked into a giant patch of thistles.

Have you tried salt water?

I'll try anything.

I'm considering agent orange.


Have you tried bugs?

Canada thistle stem weevil and Canada thistle gall fly work according to the intnernet
 
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