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(News.com.au)   Seven ways technology is making you stupid   (news.com.au) divider line 68
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5835 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Jul 2014 at 8:34 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-28 06:31:07 PM  
I would pay to hear Rick Perry recite the list from memory.
 
2014-07-28 06:54:02 PM  
1. Fark.com
 
2014-07-28 07:08:18 PM  
Just want to point out that you're reading this on a piece of technology.
 
2014-07-28 07:20:18 PM  
I pay $5 a month for this deck? Oh wait...
 
2014-07-28 08:16:24 PM  
Only seven.
 
2014-07-28 08:39:43 PM  
or in my case, stupider
 
2014-07-28 08:43:46 PM  
1: Nope. No devices in the bedroom, and I don't ever wake up and check them even if they're there.

2: Sure.

3: No. We're learning different things, because memorizing 400 phone numbers no longer has a valid use for us.  Just like the people who memorized how to operate a phone switch back when you had an operator to connect two lines were invalidated by modern technology.

4: Let's repackage three and see if anyone notices.

5: Let's repackage 2 and see if anyone notices.

6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.

7: So does almost anything. TV, music, reading, sex, all of them can 'stimulate the addiction centers', and/or become addicting.  But I have yet to see someone shank a ho because they couldn't watch the latest episode of Toddlers in Tiaras.
 
2014-07-28 08:46:27 PM  
Go away, baitin'.
 
2014-07-28 08:48:43 PM  

I think the conclusion the columnist reaches is off base because his facts are fla...SQUIRREL!


www.imbored.myewebsite.com

 
2014-07-28 08:50:50 PM  
Counterpoint: In Homer's day, poets would probably have mocked people for learning to write, since what kind of dufus can't memorize a fifty thousand line poem? Write it down? What kind of moron are you?
 
2014-07-28 08:52:20 PM  
Our brains being "massively rewired" by tech, says neuroscientist Michael Merzenich

Well, if you say so.

/slowly backs away from article
 
2014-07-28 09:06:24 PM  
8. spel chek.
 
2014-07-28 09:24:21 PM  
"Have you heard about this site before? It's called TVTropes. It's AMAZING!"
 
2014-07-28 09:45:11 PM  
desu
 
2014-07-28 09:45:44 PM  

Fano: Counterpoint: In Homer's day, poets would probably have mocked people for learning to write, since what kind of dufus can't memorize a fifty thousand line poem? Write it down? What kind of moron are you?


Ooooh, look at me, I'm reading the Economist! Did you know that Asia is emerging?
 
2014-07-28 09:47:21 PM  
Yeah, being a rageaholic about droneholes and glassholes has made me 'dumber'.

Just prepping the battlespace, so to speak.
 
2014-07-28 09:51:13 PM  
Let's see, things that tech has done for me.
1) I can now touch type much better than ever before.
2) I can now spell better than ever before.

stupid list is stupid
 
2014-07-28 09:56:57 PM  
I always had a short attention span.
I don't use GPS because if you do not try to find your way somewhere without one, it helps refine your sense of direction and it is use it or lose it.
I did the online game thing in the 2000s and back then there were also drugs and alcohol involved.  I suspect many also have the same.
Finally, why memorize useless stuff that is only for reference.  If you need to remember it, then doing a certain task more than 10 times will help.
 
2014-07-28 09:57:27 PM  
#8 Cracked.com

Seriously, this sounds like one of their lists. Did news.com.au lift it from their site?
 
2014-07-28 10:01:57 PM  

rev. dave: I always had a short attention span.
I don't use GPS because if you do not try to find your way somewhere without one, it helps refine your sense of direction and it is use it or lose it.
I did the online game thing in the 2000s and back then there were also drugs and alcohol involved.  I suspect many also have the same.
Finally, why memorize useless stuff that is only for reference.  If you need to remember it, then doing a certain task more than 10 times will help.


When referring to trig tables and such, I like to think of a quote my high school calculus teacher used to like to say: "Never memorize anything you can look up. Of course, that was said by Albert Einstein, who had the finest library in the world, stolen from Nazis. So you guys are going to have to memorize some things." Historical inaccuracies aside, the point seemed made to me. In the preinternet days though I used to scour bookstores for odd non-fiction books, trivia books, and the like, to find the sort of information that would be very difficult indeed to look up without the help of a search engine or many hours with dense tomes.
 
2014-07-28 10:04:22 PM  
The fat, socially awkward, not particularly smart but good at one thing (many in IT) are prospering when in the past they would die horribly.  They are weakening our gene pool with their Cheetohs and contempt for hygiene and all things decent.
 
2014-07-28 10:05:28 PM  

kroonermanblack: No devices in the bedroom


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-28 10:22:52 PM  

Nemo's Brother: The fat, socially awkward, not particularly smart but good at one thing (many in IT) are prospering when in the past they would die horribly.  They are weakening our gene pool with their Cheetohs and contempt for hygiene and all things decent.


No, in the past they'd end up in "high tech" field like radio+TV repair, accounting, of they might have been "calculators", people hired to do the math we typically have spreadsheets do for us now.
 
2014-07-28 10:23:27 PM  

UsikFark: kroonermanblack: No devices in the bedroom

[img.fark.net image 700x517]


Dear God! What is that for?! I mean... there's a hole, but... what's on the other end? Also, why? Never mind, I don't want to know. I'm out.

/homersimpson_receding_into_bushes.gif
 
2014-07-28 10:49:37 PM  

Mr Tarantula: UsikFark: kroonermanblack: No devices in the bedroom

[img.fark.net image 700x517]

Dear God! What is that for?! I mean... there's a hole, but... what's on the other end? Also, why? Never mind, I don't want to know. I'm out.

/homersimpson_receding_into_bushes.gif


The thread it's from is TF-only, but some dude had combined a random orbital sander, PVC pipe, duck tape, and a vacuum (not shown) to produce a sort of Tim-Taylor-approved dick holster.
 
2014-07-28 10:50:28 PM  
dittybopper:1. Fark.com/politics/
 
2014-07-28 10:53:38 PM  

Robots are Strong: dittybopper:1. Fark.com/politics/


3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-28 10:58:09 PM  
8.  Stupid "X things that Y" lists
 
2014-07-28 10:58:34 PM  

phillydrifter: Our brains being "massively rewired" by tech, says neuroscientist Michael Merzenich

Well, if you say so.

/slowly backs away from article


But everything we do routinely rewires our brains to a certain extent. Witness the article the other day about how pro soccer players' brains only activate 10% to the degree that a rookie's does. Call it muscle memory, call it a macro, he has done something frequently enough that his brain has made doing it more efficient.

And also on the subject of DNRTFA, it this had been written in 1914 it'd be about how kids these days no longer know how to shoe horses and properly pilot a buggy.
 
2014-07-28 11:07:00 PM  

Anonymous Bosch: But everything we do routinely rewires our brains to a certain extent


This is true.

Mini-rant. EVERYONE should change up their schedules. Get in the habit because it will help you when you age.

Change your route to work. Rearrange your living room furniture. Change the route of your walks. Change your workout routine. Eat breakfast outside. Whatever!

Changing your everyday routine will force your brain to expand it's pathways. It will help keep you sharp and farkworthy.

//Oldass farker
 
2014-07-28 11:14:57 PM  

kroonermanblack: 6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.


I've only ever used maps when traveling cross-country, never to get around locally. Driving by the trial and error method is how you learn to get around and where things are. It's amazing how many things you will learn by simply taking a street to see if it will get you where you're going.

People who rely on GPS to get around are completely clueless when they don't have access to it because they never learned street names and where they lead or what's near major landmarks etc., all they know is "Turn right at the next intersection..."
 
2014-07-28 11:29:03 PM  

ReapTheChaos: kroonermanblack: 6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.

I've only ever used maps when traveling cross-country, never to get around locally. Driving by the trial and error method is how you learn to get around and where things are. It's amazing how many things you will learn by simply taking a street to see if it will get you where you're going.

People who rely on GPS to get around are completely clueless when they don't have access to it because they never learned street names and where they lead or what's near major landmarks etc., all they know is "Turn right at the next intersection..."


THIS...

It's amazing how many people cannot get anywhere without a GPS, they refuse to remember the route, the area, etc.

I have a terrible memory for street names, so I do look it up before I leave and will use my phone to look a map up if I can't find the place I'd going to if I've never been there, same as a paper map but with search capacity, but once I've been somewhere I can find my route, sort my direction and go places without having to get a map or device out.

Then again, in my teen years, I'd be exploring my city from end to end, would go in unknown areas, semi-lose myself but would eventually figure my way back home.  This was way before any devices even existed and never used a map, just had a good sense of direction.

For many people that I consider bad drivers, this is beyond their understanding and capacity.  The younger generation/new drivers are the worse ones, but then again, their experience appears to be nothing more than basements, school, local fast food places and the malls.
 
2014-07-28 11:40:14 PM  

kroonermanblack: 6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.


In fact, I have experienced a similar phenomenon in video games.

I have played the Grant Theft Auto games from the Playstation 2 era, and the Grand Theft Auto and Saints Row games from the previous console generation. The Playstation 2 era games offered only an in-game map, with no route planning nor guidance. The games on the previous generation of consoles offered in-game "GPS" options with turn-by-turn directions.

In the older series of games, I would eventually and fully learn the layouts of the fictional cities. In the later series of games, I found myself frequently becoming lost without use of the navigational aids.

I therefore have little difficulty in believing that a similar phenomenon can occur with real-life navigation.
 
2014-07-28 11:43:10 PM  

namatad: Let's see, things that tech has done for me.
1) I can now touch type much better than ever before.
2) I can now spell better than ever before.

stupid list is stupid


I knew how to type and spell correctly on an Ibm Selectric.
 
2014-07-28 11:49:38 PM  

UsikFark: Mr Tarantula: UsikFark: kroonermanblack: No devices in the bedroom

[img.fark.net image 700x517]

Dear God! What is that for?! I mean... there's a hole, but... what's on the other end? Also, why? Never mind, I don't want to know. I'm out.

/homersimpson_receding_into_bushes.gif

The thread it's from is TF-only, but some dude had combined a random orbital sander, PVC pipe, duck tape, and a vacuum (not shown) to produce a sort of Tim-Taylor-approved dick holster.


So now the question is: am I now less likely or more likely to sign up for TF?

/a little from column A
//a little from column B
///three slashie salute for the poor bastard who made that
 
2014-07-28 11:58:59 PM  

kroonermanblack: 1: Nope. No devices in the bedroom, and I don't ever wake up and check them even if they're there.

2: Sure.

3: No. We're learning different things, because memorizing 400 phone numbers no longer has a valid use for us.  Just like the people who memorized how to operate a phone switch back when you had an operator to connect two lines were invalidated by modern technology.

4: Let's repackage three and see if anyone notices.

5: Let's repackage 2 and see if anyone notices.

6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.

7: So does almost anything. TV, music, reading, sex, all of them can 'stimulate the addiction centers', and/or become addicting.  But I have yet to see someone shank a ho because they couldn't watch the latest episode of Toddlers in Tiaras.


CSB regarding story #6.....

There's a place called Crystal River not very far from where I grew up in Florida.  I took my GF at the time in 2008 there to hang out on the beach.

I've been there at least a dozen times as a child, and based on proximity to where I lived, it should have been easy for me to get there right?

Right?

I ended up buying a map at a convenience store.  Yeah, not even the store clerk knew how to get there.

Again, I'd been there a dozen times (or more) as a kid.

/end CSB
 
2014-07-29 12:03:17 AM  

baronbloodbath: kroonermanblack: 1: Nope. No devices in the bedroom, and I don't ever wake up and check them even if they're there.

2: Sure.

3: No. We're learning different things, because memorizing 400 phone numbers no longer has a valid use for us.  Just like the people who memorized how to operate a phone switch back when you had an operator to connect two lines were invalidated by modern technology.

4: Let's repackage three and see if anyone notices.

5: Let's repackage 2 and see if anyone notices.

6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.

7: So does almost anything. TV, music, reading, sex, all of them can 'stimulate the addiction centers', and/or become addicting.  But I have yet to see someone shank a ho because they couldn't watch the latest episode of Toddlers in Tiaras.

CSB regarding story #6.....

There's a place called Crystal River not very far from where I grew up in Florida.  I took my GF at the time in 2008 there to hang out on the beach.

I've been there at least a dozen times as a child, and based on proximity to where I lived, it should have been easy for me to get there right?

Right?

I ended up buying a map at a convenience store.  Yeah, not even the store clerk knew how to get there.

Again, I'd been there a dozen times (or more) as a kid.

/end CSB


postprojection.files.wordpress.com

Your story seems familiar.
 
2014-07-29 12:09:59 AM  
8. News.com.au?
 
2014-07-29 12:36:55 AM  
As Nicholas Carr explains in The Shallows, memory comes in two types: transient working memory and long-term memory

www.human-memory.net

Also:

3: You Can't Remember Much...
4. You're Much More Forgetful Than You Used To Be.

o_O

/stupid article is stupid
 
2014-07-29 12:56:56 AM  
They missed getting those insufferable fwd fwd fwd emails from Uncle Bob.

/to be fair I don't actually read them
 
2014-07-29 01:02:39 AM  

baronbloodbath: Again, I'd been there a dozen times (or more) as a kid.


I find it very difficult to remember routes as a passenger. Once I drive someplace 2 or three times I've got it down, but I can ride along 20 times and not remember the exact route.
 
2014-07-29 01:35:57 AM  

kroonermanblack: 6: You never could. Before GPS we had maps, or Mapsco, or similar products. The areas you're likely to have memorized are (le gaspe) the same ones you would have anyway.


I used to just look up directions on google maps ... then write them down on paper.
 
2014-07-29 01:47:22 AM  
GPS can make me stupid, then, because

A) I don't have time to fart around all day trying to find locations I've never been to for work (I sometimes travel several times a week) when I have to be in a place at a time

B) When some nice person tries to give me vague directions accompanied by hand-waving, I can smile, nod politely, ask for the address "just in case," go outside, and punch the address into my phone.  Zero time wasted trying to remember someone's convoluted if well-intentioned directions.

Just sayin'.
 
2014-07-29 02:10:42 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: GPS can make me stupid, then, because

A) I don't have time to fart around all day trying to find locations I've never been to for work (I sometimes travel several times a week) when I have to be in a place at a time

B) When some nice person tries to give me vague directions accompanied by hand-waving, I can smile, nod politely, ask for the address "just in case," go outside, and punch the address into my phone.  Zero time wasted trying to remember someone's convoluted if well-intentioned directions.

Just sayin'.


Yeah being a pizza guy must have sucked before GPS, amirite?
 
2014-07-29 02:28:17 AM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: GPS can make me stupid, then, because

A) I don't have time to fart around all day trying to find locations I've never been to for work (I sometimes travel several times a week) when I have to be in a place at a time

B) When some nice person tries to give me vague directions accompanied by hand-waving, I can smile, nod politely, ask for the address "just in case," go outside, and punch the address into my phone.  Zero time wasted trying to remember someone's convoluted if well-intentioned directions.

Just sayin'.

Yeah being a pizza guy must have sucked before GPS, amirite?


Because pizza guys drive out of their delivery area to cities they've never been to, all the time, on a tight schedule.

Thanks, I'll keep my GPS and my job.
 
2014-07-29 02:36:14 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: Because pizza guys drive out of their delivery area to cities they've never been to, all the time, on a tight schedule.

Thanks, I'll keep my GPS and my job.


Well, at least you'll never have to worry about it taking you 27 minutes to find the gym.
 
2014-07-29 03:10:11 AM  
Wait ... what was I commenting on again?
 
2014-07-29 06:44:21 AM  
There is ample evidence that if you give two groups of people a long article, one on paper, the other on a device, the paper readers will understand and retain much more information. Carr's "The Shallows" has some hypothetical explanations for this, but we aren't really sure why one medium seems a more efficient way of ensuring information is retained by the reader.
 
2014-07-29 06:51:18 AM  

PleaseHamletDon'tHurtEm: GPS can make me stupid, then, because


GPS doesn't make you stupid, it's just that the conventions of urban navigation are closer to an internalized skill or learned language than to something requiring being "smart".

You have to automatically assume things like even and odd numbers being across the street from each other, block numbers being in 100s or 1000s, when streets are going to be labeled and and what an alley is vs a new block, etc to do it quickly, just like you have to have internalized things like when to use which articles to speak English.  If you haven't done it regularly you can still do it, sure, it'll just take longer and you'll likely occasionally mess it up.

Basically complaining that GPS is destroying people's navigational abilities is both true and untrue, like saying that the popularity of football destroyed Americans' skills at Baseball.  Yes, statistically fewer people bother, but they're still  capable of mastering the skill if they go out of their way to practice, and on a case by case basis they can work it out if necessary.
 
2014-07-29 06:59:08 AM  
Another article where old people make disparaging claims about young people without any actual evidence and we all pretend like it's an indication of the decay of society and not just the same complaints old people have been making for centuries.

There are new and different ways to be distracted, but distraction is inherent to the human condition, not the result of proximity to a keyboard.
 
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