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(WTOP)   University of Delaware announces mandatory threesomes for incoming freshman class. University of Delaware trifecta now in play   (wtop.com) divider line 46
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10658 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Jul 2014 at 9:09 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-28 08:35:13 PM  
When I was in college the term for putting (N+1) people in a room meant for N was "crowding." There was temporary crowding and permanent crowding. Some people liked crowding because rent was lower.
 
2014-07-28 09:16:14 PM  
UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.
 
2014-07-28 09:16:24 PM  
i291.photobucket.com

/wrong ratio
//but it does have a hot, young lfb
///fap anyways
 
2014-07-28 09:17:48 PM  
I assumed this was in reference to Kappa Alpha's annual rush week festivities/gang rapes.
 
2014-07-28 09:18:18 PM  
This always happened at the beginning of the school year at any dorm I stayed in.  You had three or four people to a two person room, crowding each other, hating each other, but by mid-terms a lot of people have dropped out so housing can shift people around.  A great solution would be not requiring on campus living for the freshman and sophmores like a lot of colleges like to do these days.  Of course, while freshman are required to live on campus, they're not allowed to park on campus because upper classmen get priority parking, but that too works itself out occasionally.
 
2014-07-28 09:25:33 PM  
Hawt!

This post is brought to you by Wal-Mart
 
2014-07-28 09:28:15 PM  
I don't want to even imagine the stench in those rooms.
 
2014-07-28 09:28:24 PM  
Friendly masturbatory sessions just became heated soggy biscuit contests
 
2014-07-28 09:29:52 PM  
Mo' money
Mo' money
Mo-oh money
 
2014-07-28 09:30:45 PM  

abhorrent1: I don't want to even imagine the stench in those rooms.


The smell will be abhorrent.
 
2014-07-28 09:37:54 PM  
They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.
 
2014-07-28 09:41:21 PM  

media.tumblr.com

 
2014-07-28 09:51:02 PM  

CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.


We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.
 
2014-07-28 09:51:30 PM  
Why don't they ever assign fresen to the University President's house?

When I started college, overflow ended up at the downtown YMCA. That would have been awful.
 
2014-07-28 09:54:19 PM  

insertsnarkyusername: CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.

We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.


Best roommate I ever had was Asian ...except for the perpetual smell of sour dried fish ...and of course, midnight weekend opium den smoke filled gambling pit that I stumbled into once. True story. 20 people gambling in a room made for two. Place was spotless in the morning.
 
2014-07-28 09:55:13 PM  
In some of the newer dorms on campus, turning them into triples won't be an issue, and hopefully that's where they'll do it most.

I had a single the size of a double for 2 years, so I can't complain.
 
2014-07-28 09:57:05 PM  

itsaidwhat: insertsnarkyusername: CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.

We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.

Best roommate I ever had was Asian ...except for the perpetual smell of sour dried fish ...and of course, midnight weekend opium den smoke filled gambling pit that I stumbled into once. True story. 20 people gambling in a room made for two. Place was spotless in the morning.


One of them was my roommate. Great guy but barely spoke english so not a whole lot of communication going on. I never could figure out why the showers were carpeted in pubes. We had a weekly cleaning crew and everyone I knew sprayed out the shower before stepping in. But every damn day you sprayed pubes down the drain.
 
2014-07-28 09:57:30 PM  
There's always space in the gym.

s2.dmcdn.net
 
2014-07-28 09:58:28 PM  
My dorm room in college was smaller than my bathroom today, and I don't have a big house.

For putting the extra person in they are loading the dorm fee right?
 
2014-07-28 09:59:46 PM  

gadian: This always happened at the beginning of the school year at any dorm I stayed in.  You had three or four people to a two person room, crowding each other, hating each other, but by mid-terms a lot of people have dropped out so housing can shift people around.  A great solution would be not requiring on campus living for the freshman and sophmores like a lot of colleges like to do these days.  Of course, while freshman are required to live on campus, they're not allowed to park on campus because upper classmen get priority parking, but that too works itself out occasionally.


The other solution would be to have more rigorous acceptance standards so that you don't take in more students than you can handle.

Or at least encourage more first and second year students to attend community college before transferring.
 
2014-07-28 10:02:00 PM  

insertsnarkyusername: CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.

We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.


You've never seen Asian porn then. Turns out Asians are just as hairy as other races, just a different distribution. What they lack elsewhere they make up for in density down there.
 
2014-07-28 10:02:40 PM  

PhDemented: UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.


Why not accept less students?  Oh, right...$$$$
 
2014-07-28 10:05:01 PM  

the_coach5040: PhDemented: UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.

Why not accept less students?  Oh, right...$$$$


What's worse is they are both accepting more students and charging ever-increasing tuition and fees.
 
2014-07-28 10:06:01 PM  
itssaidwhat:
insertsnarkyusername: CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.

We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.

Best roommate I ever had was Asian ...except for the perpetual smell of sour dried fish ...and of course, midnight weekend opium den smoke filled gambling pit that I stumbled into once. True story. 20 people gambling in a room made for two. Place was spotless in the morning.

One of them was my roommate. Great guy but barely spoke english so not a whole lot of communication going on. I never could figure out why the showers were carpeted in pubes. We had a weekly cleaning crew and everyone I knew sprayed out the shower before stepping in. But every damn day you sprayed pubes down the drai
n.


Gee, me so solly!  Excuse me prease -this be picture of roommate?

i.huffpost.com
 
2014-07-28 10:18:10 PM  

PhDemented: UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.


I was in a double converted to a triple (in Russell) there my freshman year in '99.  IIRC the housing crunch was so bad that year that they were housing some students temporarily in student lounges converted into rooms.

I managed to snag a single on the north mall my junior year though, which was like winning the housing lottery, so that was at least nice.
 
2014-07-28 10:20:47 PM  
What you imagine:  www.joearmory.com

What you get:  wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
2014-07-28 10:26:32 PM  
One third less rent?  Sounds good to me.
 
2014-07-28 10:40:43 PM  

SwiftFox: One third less rent?  Sounds good to me.


I very much doubt it.
 
2014-07-28 11:05:05 PM  

insertsnarkyusername: We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.


Bansai pube and asscaping with tiny scissors
 
2014-07-28 11:09:21 PM  

morg: SwiftFox: One third less rent?  Sounds good to me.

I very much doubt it.


IIRC they do credit back a certain amount of your housing costs, but it isn't a full third off.
 
2014-07-29 01:40:35 AM  

SwiftFox: One third less rent?  Sounds good to me.


Depends.  The space factor of cost drops by a third, but water use doesn't drop at all and your electrical use is unlikely to drop by that much unless the last roommate doesn't have a cell phone, computer, etc.  There's going to be some savings, but since dormitories have included utilities it's more likely to be on the order of 10 or 20%, tops.
 
2014-07-29 02:02:18 AM  
She says their grades are typically higher and that a lot of students enjoy the social environment.

Said no student ever
 
2014-07-29 02:38:25 AM  
Attended UDel in the '80s, was put into "extended housing" a/k/a a double converted into a triple my first semester.  It sucked.  There were also floor lounges that had been converted into dorm rooms.  At least I wasn't in one of those.

No worries, UDel doesn't have any qualms about kicking out people who can't or won't hack the work, or at least they didn't back then.  After my first semester I moved into a single across campus.
 
2014-07-29 02:45:12 AM  

itsaidwhat: insertsnarkyusername: CruJones: They probably still get their own bathrooms, whippersnappers these days don't even have the nasty ass communal bathrooms we had to slog to.  Uphill both ways.

We had a lot of japanese exchange students that we shared a small bathroom with. I'm not sure how but they managed to constantly leave black pubes on the floor of every shower.

Best roommate I ever had was Asian ...except for the perpetual smell of sour dried fish ...and of course, midnight weekend opium den smoke filled gambling pit that I stumbled into once. True story. 20 people gambling in a room made for two. Place was spotless in the morning.


A long long time ago I had a Polish/Asian roommate.  It was an interesting marriage of stereotypes.
 
2014-07-29 05:00:02 AM  

Jim_Callahan: SwiftFox: One third less rent?  Sounds good to me.

Depends.  The space factor of cost drops by a third, but water use doesn't drop at all and your electrical use is unlikely to drop by that much unless the last roommate doesn't have a cell phone, computer, etc.  There's going to be some savings, but since dormitories have included utilities it's more likely to be on the order of 10 or 20%, tops.


Really? When I was in college the monthly rent was always the same. Utilities were included.
 
pla
2014-07-29 06:59:56 AM  
Protip, kids: Just get an off-campus apartment and take classes as a non-matriculating student for the first year, then pick a major and enroll as a sophomore the next year.

This carries a risk, though, in that they might not accept you the second year.  But if you pull decent grades, they usually will (because a huge number of freshmen will have dropped out anyway, leaving quite a few 2nd year slots open).

Simply amazing the shiat colleges can pull involving housing, in any other context, the city or state would shut 'em down as the worst kind of slumlords.
 
2014-07-29 07:45:58 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: PhDemented: UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.

I was in a double converted to a triple (in Russell) there my freshman year in '99.  IIRC the housing crunch was so bad that year that they were housing some students temporarily in student lounges converted into rooms.

I managed to snag a single on the north mall my junior year though, which was like winning the housing lottery, so that was at least nice.


I started in 2000, and my friend was in a single that had been a janitorial closet. It still had the water pipes and the floor drain. When it got hot, it smelled awful.
 
2014-07-29 08:56:12 AM  

pho75: TuteTibiImperes: PhDemented: UD has been doing that on and off for years.  They just shove a bunk bed into the rooms.  Guess the article even notes that it was done last year, looks like this year is just an increase.  They've had a long running problem with not enough student housing.

I was in a double converted to a triple (in Russell) there my freshman year in '99.  IIRC the housing crunch was so bad that year that they were housing some students temporarily in student lounges converted into rooms.

I managed to snag a single on the north mall my junior year though, which was like winning the housing lottery, so that was at least nice.

I started in 2000, and my friend was in a single that had been a janitorial closet. It still had the water pipes and the floor drain. When it got hot, it smelled awful.


Did my undergrad at Boston U (did summer stuff at UD when I was home)... in my dorm, each floor had a small lounge/common area in the center.  Years before I started, they tacked on some doors to it, stuck in 4 beds, and called it a "suite".  Everyone else was two to a room, but I always felt bad for the kids stuck with 3 other roommates.  Plenty of space, but just no privacy.  My junior year, the started renting out rooms in the Howard Johnson across the way because they had no where else to put the incoming freshmen.
 
2014-07-29 09:23:28 AM  
Surprised it hasn't yet been addressed, but while tripling roommates is a hassle, if you're at college hanging around in your dorm to do much more than sleep (and nocturnal activities, I guess), you're probably doing it wrong. At least that used to be the thing. Visited a sibling's college for a weekend back in the day and the dorm was usually deserted.
 
2014-07-29 12:33:57 PM  
 
2014-07-29 02:21:50 PM  
University housing is an inexact science.

Most Residence Life programs are expected to be (financially) self-sustaining, with a budget based on no less than 98% occupancy. (That's Fall term; Spring term you lose some to study abroad, transfers-out and mid-year graduation, which is generally not offset 1:1 by incoming transfers.)

In reality there are a lot of complicating factors. I'll mention two of the biggest: a muddy admissions estimate, and ghost residents.

First, admissions itself is an inexact science. You accept more than you have room for because you know a fair number are not going to enroll (accepted to multiple schools, some will opt to go elsewhere). The formula for that is based on a number if things including past years' yields, this year's number of applicants, and regional or national age demographics. So a lot of muddy numbers, and it's a wonder the estimate comes as close to the final tally as it often does. ResLife, meanwhile, has to assign rooms usually no later than early July for a number of reasons I won't go into here. So they're using very indefinite numbers that remain fluid as long as a month into the semester.

Second, housing knows there will be a "melt." Students who accept but never show up ("ghost residents"). Sure, they lose their deposits, but that still leaves the ResLife program many thousands of dollars short. Then there are the students who leave a few days or weeks into the semester, never to return. All these absent/withdrawn students put a big hole in the operating budget if you can't find others to replace them.

Anyway, the solution most schools have been doing, since time immemorial, is to triple up and then untriple as fast as possible as the melt happens. If they really blow the calculations, then they have to look at options like booking entire floors at nearby hotels and running shuttles, which is always a financial loss but necessary if you are a school that guarantees housing.
 
2014-07-29 02:53:15 PM  

brimed03: University housing is an inexact science.


Its the nature of playing with averages and estimates.  Demented University has 1,000 dorm rooms available for incoming freshmen, and we expect another 500 students to commute, based on prior year averages.  We could accept 1,500 students, but we know that 25% of the students we accept will reject us and go elsewhere because they got into a better school, or whatever.  So, just like the year before, we here at DU accept 2,000 students, as the year prior we did the same and 1,500 accepted.  This year, for one reason or another, 1800 students accepted.  The same ratio commuted, but that still left us with 200 extra kids that we don't have room for in the dorms.

Thus, students get tripled up.  UD in particular though seems pretty bad at their estimates, for one reason or another, as they regularly have a large number of students tripled up.  Either they are just terrible at predictions, or they don't really care and just want a few more students in than they can house for the extra tuition/rent money (unless they give the tripled students a rent discount, which I doubt)
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-29 05:46:06 PM  
When I was in college, about an inflation doubling period ago, room rent for crowds was calculated by a formula similar to

$100 + (basic rent - $100) x (basic capacity) / (crowded capacity)

So a $400 per person double would go for $300 per person as a triple.
 
2014-07-29 10:02:20 PM  

PhDemented: brimed03: University housing is an inexact science.

Its the nature of playing with averages and estimates.  Demented University has 1,000 dorm rooms available for incoming freshmen, and we expect another 500 students to commute, based on prior year averages.  We could accept 1,500 students, but we know that 25% of the students we accept will reject us and go elsewhere because they got into a better school, or whatever.  So, just like the year before, we here at DU accept 2,000 students, as the year prior we did the same and 1,500 accepted.  This year, for one reason or another, 1800 students accepted.  The same ratio commuted, but that still left us with 200 extra kids that we don't have room for in the dorms.

Thus, students get tripled up.  UD in particular though seems pretty bad at their estimates, for one reason or another, as they regularly have a large number of students tripled up.  Either they are just terrible at predictions, or they don't really care and just want a few more students in than they can house for the extra tuition/rent money (unless they give the tripled students a rent discount, which I doubt)


A good concrete example. And yes, some schools can also deliberately over-accept to get additional revenue; but that's a short-term gain with bigger long-term losses.

In the college search process, word gets around quickly, and a good way to ensure declining acceptances is to earn a reputation for lousy housing. Then you have to lower admissions standards to guarantee the necessary class sizes, and pretty soon you're screwed. *Most* schools understand this and don't play that game for practical reasons if nothing else. It's a losing game.

I've never heard of a school that didn't discount forced triples or quads (which is the term used when the room wasn't designed to be a triple-- those that were so designed may not be discounted, but they're also proportionally bigger). It won't be as big a discount as dividing the overall room rate by three instead of two, because the utilities will still be a fixed cost per resident and the university has to cover that (as someone else mentioned upthread). But they will get some discount for having less square footage.
 
2014-07-29 11:56:21 PM  

brimed03: I've never heard of a school that didn't discount forced triples or quad


I don't think the quads discounted back when I was in school, but that was over 15 years ago, so I honestly don't have recent information about that and 18/19 year old freshmen in college don't tend to pay much attention to how much money they are spending... was just venturing a guess in that area.  Moved off campus ASAP since it was far cheaper to get an apt and make food than pay the school room+board rate (this was in Boston).
 
2014-07-30 01:35:53 AM  
In hindsight after attending a community college during a summer I wished I had just started out there.  The classes and books were cheap enough (one teacher used his own book and happily handed it out on CD or printed for free if you didn't want to buy the professionally bound copy) that I could have had a nice studio apartment all to myself for the same price.

And the faculty there was just as good as the faculty at any other SUNY school I went to.  For the money I wish I'd just done my first two years there and then transferred to somewhere else instead of burning myself out and having a shiatty adviser who forgot to tell me about a two years of classes I'd need to graduate until I was 3 1/2 years in.
 
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