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(Daily Telegraph)   Rugby match ends with 101-0 score. Losing team still tougher than the Houston Texans   (dailytelegraph.com.au) divider line 35
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683 clicks; posted to Sports » on 28 Jul 2014 at 2:36 PM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-28 02:04:29 PM  
cdn.faniq.com
 
2014-07-28 03:21:27 PM  
John Heisman is not impressed.


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-28 03:31:38 PM  
I guess Subby is talking about that special "toughness" it takes to "tackle" a man in shorts by wrapping your arms around his thighs and jamming your face into his buttcrack.
 
2014-07-28 03:49:01 PM  
And in better physical condition too.
 
2014-07-28 03:57:21 PM  
Tackling with pads has actually been proven to be more dangerous because the players feel invincible and the helmets effectively are weapons, but it's whatever, Subby played rugby in college and likely still brags about it on a daily basis 10, 15 years later
 
2014-07-28 04:02:02 PM  
Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.
 
2014-07-28 04:04:43 PM  
My college side was about as pitiful although no one ever hung a 100 on us. The worst was a 70-odd to small-but-greater-than-zero drubbing from Air Force Academy.
 
2014-07-28 04:05:40 PM  

aintnuttintofarkwith: Tackling with pads has actually been proven to be more dangerous because the players feel invincible and the helmets effectively are weapons, but it's whatever, Subby played rugby in college and likely still brags about it on a daily basis 10, 15 years later


Subby and every other drunk frat boy that couldn't play college football.
 
2014-07-28 04:09:07 PM  
Rugby match ends with 101-0 score. Losing team still tougher drunker than the Houston Texans

/FTFS
//alcoholism is a prereq for being a rugby player
 
2014-07-28 04:39:01 PM  

maxx2112: John Heisman is not impressed.
[GeorgiaTechVsCunningham.jpg 565×260]

c4t:ls
 
2014-07-28 04:46:24 PM  

LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.


Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique
 
2014-07-28 05:05:19 PM  
Too bad they don't play a real man's sport...like badminton.
 
2014-07-28 05:20:30 PM  

maxx2112: John Heisman is not impressed.


[img.fark.net image 565x260]


Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.
 
2014-07-28 06:23:57 PM  

Cybernetic: maxx2112: John Heisman is not impressed.


[img.fark.net image 565x260]

Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.


Curious now as to how many periods were in football that far back. How close was it to rugby?
 
rka
2014-07-28 06:46:57 PM  

jst3p: LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.

Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique


Sure, you just have to deal with the higher risk of spinal cord injury in rugby.
 
2014-07-28 06:47:20 PM  

Krustofsky: Cybernetic: maxx2112: John Heisman is not impressed.


[img.fark.net image 565x260]

Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.

Curious now as to how many periods were in football that far back. How close was it to rugby?


4 quarters. The 5th box is the 222 points that the 4 combined quarters totaled up to.
 
2014-07-28 07:20:27 PM  

EqualOpportunityEnslaver: Krustofsky: Cybernetic: maxx2112: John Heisman is not impressed.


[img.fark.net image 565x260]

Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.

Curious now as to how many periods were in football that far back. How close was it to rugby?

4 quarters. The 5th box is the 222 points that the 4 combined quarters totaled up to.


Thanks, I knew it was 222-0, but the photo looked like it was cropped.
 
2014-07-28 08:19:11 PM  

aintnuttintofarkwith: Tackling with pads has actually been proven to be more dangerous because the players feel invincible and the helmets effectively are weapons, but it's whatever, Subby played rugby in college and likely still brags about it on a daily basis 10, 15 years later


Tawmmmy?
 
2014-07-28 08:20:01 PM  

aintnuttintofarkwith: Tackling with pads has actually been proven to be more dangerous because the players feel invincible and the helmets effectively are weapons, but it's whatever, Subby played rugby in college and likely still brags about it on a daily basis 10, 15 years later


While it certain makes sense that helmets have made football more dangerous, when has this been "proven?"
 
2014-07-28 09:17:50 PM  
Oh, my old man's an All Black, 
He wears the silver fern, 
But his mates just couldn't take him 
So he's out now for a turn. 

Da-dit-dit-da da-dit-dit-da da-dit-dit-da-da-da 

Well, Dad's played rugby all his life 
And it's very plain to see 
He's trying very hard 
to make an All Black out of me: 

"Son don't you worry if you get punched 
When you're down in a scrum, 
Just you wait 'til there's a ruck 
And you can fix the guilty one!" 

Oh, my old man's an All Black, 
He wears the silver fern, 
But his mates just couldn't take him 
So he's out now for a turn. 

Da-dit-dit-da da-dit-dit-da da-dit-dit-da-da-da 
So he's out---- now----- for a turn------ ! 

Der ditdit Da, Der ditdit Da, Dee ditdit Da da Da 

So he's out-- now-- for-- a-- turn!
 
2014-07-28 10:22:14 PM  
www.rankopedia.com
 
2014-07-28 11:28:04 PM  
So Sydney high school sports are becoming like the US, just like nearly everything else?
 
2014-07-29 12:31:06 AM  
Oh that's cute. Reach WAY back for the "weaker than the Texans" HAMMER PUNCHLINE

nailed it
 
2014-07-29 02:18:21 AM  

rka: jst3p: LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.

Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique

Sure, you just have to deal with the higher risk of spinal cord injury in rugby.


Citation needed.
 
2014-07-29 09:15:40 AM  

jst3p: rka: jst3p: LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.

Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique

Sure, you just have to deal with the higher risk of spinal cord injury in rugby.

Citation needed.


^THAT^

Football helmets increase the likelihood of leading with your head.
 
rka
2014-07-29 10:15:29 AM  

jst3p: rka: jst3p: LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.

Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique

Sure, you just have to deal with the higher risk of spinal cord injury in rugby.

Citation needed.


Here's the International Rugby Board's own study on catastrophic injuries (either death or serious head/spine). It's defined in section 3.2 if you care to quibble with IRB's own definitions.

For rugby, the average rate for catastrophic injuries across all countries is 4.6 per 100,000. In every country, spinal injuries are #1.
For US football, the rate is around 1-2 per 100,000. Less than 1 in high school. A bit more than 2 in college.

In Figure 3, IRB, the sports governing body, puts Rugby's level of risk at twice the level of American football. Rugby is in the "tolerable" risk area, US football is in the lower "acceptable" risk.

http://irbplayerwelfare.com/pdfs/CI_Risk_Assessment_EN.pdf

So yeah, perhaps less risk of concussion (but this study doesn't cover that at all, so maybe not). over twice the risk of death or severe spinal/head injury.

Bottom line, even the IRB says Rubgy is not safer than US football. How is it people believe exactly the opposite?  An Inconvenient Truth indeed.

PluckYew: Football helmets increase the likelihood of leading with your head.


Nice soundbite. Almost makes you sound authoritative when you regurgitate that meaningless statement.
 
2014-07-29 11:48:32 AM  

rka: jst3p: rka: jst3p: LarryDan43: Look the real toughness is getting the brain damage without millions of dollars in compensation the NFL would provide.

Actually concussions are far less common because when you aren't wearing a helmet you don't slam your head into someone else's head. It is still a bad idea when wearing a helmet, but somehow that gets lost in the moment.

I started playing again this year on an old boys team (35+) it is great fun and I used it as a motivator to get my son to play rugby rather than football. He had a blast in the spring season and wants to play in the fall. As a dad this pleases me greatly because it is far safer than football.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique

Sure, you just have to deal with the higher risk of spinal cord injury in rugby.

Citation needed.

Here's the International Rugby Board's own study on catastrophic injuries (either death or serious head/spine). It's defined in section 3.2 if you care to quibble with IRB's own definitions.

For rugby, the average rate for catastrophic injuries across all countries is 4.6 per 100,000. In every country, spinal injuries are #1.
For US football, the rate is around 1-2 per 100,000. Less than 1 in high school. A bit more than 2 in college.

In Figure 3, IRB, the sports governing body, puts Rugby's level of risk at twice the level of American football. Rugby is in the "tolerable" risk area, US football is in the lower "acceptable" risk.

http://irbplayerwelfare.com/pdfs/CI_Risk_Assessment_EN.pdf

So yeah, perhaps less risk of concussion (but this study doesn't cover that at all, so maybe not). over twice the risk of death or severe spinal/head injury.

Bottom line, even the IRB says Rubgy is not safer than US football. How is it people believe exactly the opposite?  An Inconvenient Truth indeed.

PluckYew: Football helmets increase the likelihood of leading with your head.

Nice soundbite. Almost makes you so ...


From the executive summary of the PDF you linked:

The results indicated that for rugby union players in England, the risk of sustaining a catastrophic 
injury (0.84/100,000 per year)
came within the Health and Safety Executive's 'acceptable region' 
of risk (0.1 to 2/100,000 per year), whilst the average risk of catastrophic injury experienced by 
rugby players in other countries (4.6/100,000 per year) fell within the 'tolerable region' of risk (2 to 
100/100,000 per year). The risk of sustaining a catastrophic injury in rugby union in England was 
generally lower than that experienced in a wide range of other collision sports, such as ice hockey 
(4/100,000 per year), rugby league (2/100,000 per year) and American Football (1/100,000 per 
year).
 
rka
2014-07-29 12:01:33 PM  

jst3p: From the executive summary of the PDF you linked:

The results indicated that for rugby union players in England, the risk of sustaining a catastrophic 
injury (0.84/100,000 per year) came within the Health and Safety Executive's 'acceptable region' 
of risk (0.1 to 2/100,000 per year), whilst the average risk of catastrophic injury experienced by 
rugby players in other countries (4.6/100,000 per year) fell within the 'tolerable region' of risk (2 to 
100/100,000 per year)
. The risk of sustaining a catastrophic injury in rugby union in England was 
generally lower than that experienced in a wide range of other collision sports, such as ice hockey 
(4/100,000 per year), rugby league (2/100,000 per year) and American Football (1/100,000 per 
year).


Any reason you're ignoring "in other countries"?

That's just England. So why ignore the 4.4 in Australia? Or the 4.2 in NZ? Or the 3.3 in US?

And if you include everyone else it gets even worse.

Rugby = Worse than US Football according to Rugby's own study.
 
2014-07-29 12:11:07 PM  

rka: jst3p: From the executive summary of the PDF you linked:

The results indicated that for rugby union players in England, the risk of sustaining a catastrophic
injury (0.84/100,000 per year) came within the Health and Safety Executive's 'acceptable region'
of risk (0.1 to 2/100,000 per year), whilst the average risk of catastrophic injury experienced by
rugby players in other countries (4.6/100,000 per year) fell within the 'tolerable region' of risk (2 to
100/100,000 per year). The risk of sustaining a catastrophic injury in rugby union in England was
generally lower than that experienced in a wide range of other collision sports, such as ice hockey
(4/100,000 per year), rugby league (2/100,000 per year) and American Football (1/100,000 per
year).

Any reason you're ignoring "in other countries"?

That's just England. So why ignore the 4.4 in Australia? Or the 4.2 in NZ? Or the 3.3 in US?

And if you include everyone else it gets even worse.

Rugby = Worse than US Football according to Rugby's own study.


For one specific very rare injury. Meanwhile in a study of 35 former NFL and CFL players 34 of them showed degenerative brain disease.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2242643/Head-injury-study-33 -N FL-football-players-brain-disease-deaths.html


Only one of the 35 football players showed no signs of brain disease, while 31 of the 34 NFL players (only one CFL player was included in the study) had stage three to four CTE.
 
rka
2014-07-29 12:30:51 PM  

jst3p: rka: jst3p: From the executive summary of the PDF you linked:

The results indicated that for rugby union players in England, the risk of sustaining a catastrophic
injury (0.84/100,000 per year) came within the Health and Safety Executive's 'acceptable region'
of risk (0.1 to 2/100,000 per year), whilst the average risk of catastrophic injury experienced by
rugby players in other countries (4.6/100,000 per year) fell within the 'tolerable region' of risk (2 to
100/100,000 per year). The risk of sustaining a catastrophic injury in rugby union in England was
generally lower than that experienced in a wide range of other collision sports, such as ice hockey
(4/100,000 per year), rugby league (2/100,000 per year) and American Football (1/100,000 per
year).

Any reason you're ignoring "in other countries"?

That's just England. So why ignore the 4.4 in Australia? Or the 4.2 in NZ? Or the 3.3 in US?

And if you include everyone else it gets even worse.

Rugby = Worse than US Football according to Rugby's own study.

For one specific very rare injury. Meanwhile in a study of 35 former NFL and CFL players 34 of them showed degenerative brain disease.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2242643/Head-injury-study-33 -N FL-football-players-brain-disease-deaths.html


Only one of the 35 football players showed no signs of brain disease, while 31 of the 34 NFL players (only one CFL player was included in the study) had stage three to four CTE.


No doubt. I think you'll find my postings on NFL CTE to be right in line with that as well.

This IRB study didn't delve into CTE. In fact, it wasn't until last October that they even took the first step to admitting a link between CTE and concussions in the first place. The AUT's study on Rugby CTE was pushed back because they didn't get enough subjects initially. Hell, they're still trying. Know any former high level Rugby players?

https://www.sprinz.aut.ac.nz/our-research/rugby-health

Who knows what they will find once they actually do a proper study. My guess it will be on par with the  NFL once you get past the anecdotes and "well, everyone knows that helmets lead to more concussions!". Rugby has had it's head in the sand on this issue even longer than the NFL. And that's saying something.
 
2014-07-29 12:40:18 PM  

rka: Who knows what they will find once they actually do a proper study. My guess it will be on par with the  NFL once you get past the anecdotes and "well, everyone knows that helmets lead to more concussions!".


Fair enough, having played both I disagree with your guess. Those who are talking about it and understand both sports disagree as well.

http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/eye-performance/201310/rugby-footbal l- concussions-tackling-safety-technique

Better to avoid getting hit in the head to start with. That's where rugby comes in. Rugby's contact rules are centered around the wrap tackle. A tackler can't just slam into the ballcarrier. He has to wrap his arms around and bring him to the ground. Tackling around the neck or head is illegal. Tackling low -- around the ankles or knees -- is fine, but because you have to wrap up, you're not barreling into a player's knees and causing injuries the way a roll block in football can.
Without helmets (some rugby players wear padded hats that are a little like football helmets from the 1920s, all they do is prevent scrapes), rugby players are taught from an early age to get their head to the side, and make contact with the shoulder. Cheek-to-cheek is the coach's joke, with the tackler's cheek up against a ballcarrier's butt-cheek.


...

"Football players are taught to put the helmet into the chest and drive the player back," said Saunders. "And I know the coaches at Boise State are looking at a different way to go about it because of the issues with concussions."


The way tackles are made are fundamentally  different.

I will encourage my kid to stick with Rugby. And for what it is worth, he is a back, not a forward and playing sevens now which further reduced the risk of spinal injury you cherry picked (those happen in the scrum almost exclusively).
 
rka
2014-07-29 01:10:14 PM  

jst3p: reduced the risk of spinal injury you cherry picked (those happen in the scrum almost exclusively).


C'mon. That's a sad stance. You're the one trying to cherry pick the low stats from England, which the study itself (that you obviously didn't read, just skimmed to find your stat) believes is due to poor reporting in England. It's only called out as the first point in the conclusion section.

And no, they don't happen in the scrum almost exclusively. Table 4.2 of the report shows that half to over half of the injuries occur in areas OTHER than the scrum.

Finally, to quote the report

"There are no clear trends in injury causation either with time or country. However, specific 
differences may be obscured through differences in definitions of catastrophic injury and in 
reporting procedures adopted for injury causation within individual studies.  "


Doesn't appear to support your assertion that spinal injuries "happen in the scrum almost exclusively".

Can't wait to see what you do with the CTE study data.
 
2014-07-29 01:46:00 PM  

rka: jst3p: reduced the risk of spinal injury you cherry picked (those happen in the scrum almost exclusively).

C'mon. That's a sad stance. You're the one trying to cherry pick the low stats from England, which the study itself (that you obviously didn't read, just skimmed to find your stat) believes is due to poor reporting in England. It's only called out as the first point in the conclusion section.

And no, they don't happen in the scrum almost exclusively. Table 4.2 of the report shows that half to over half of the injuries occur in areas OTHER than the scrum.

Finally, to quote the report

"There are no clear trends in injury causation either with time or country. However, specific 
differences may be obscured through differences in definitions of catastrophic injury and in 
reporting procedures adopted for injury causation within individual studies.  "

Doesn't appear to support your assertion that spinal injuries "happen in the scrum almost exclusively".

Can't wait to see what you do with the CTE study data.


Fair enough, you got me. Catastrophic spinal injuries happen more in rugby than American football, and they aren't limited to the scrum. Guilty as charged with regard to skimming the link you provided.

That being said it is still an extremely rare injury.

Personally I am more concerned with CTE as it seems to be much more common and while I too await the data I remain skeptical that it will be proven that it is anywhere near as common in rugby as it is in football based on the information I provided in my previous post.
 
2014-07-29 01:57:18 PM  

rka: C'mon. That's a sad stance. You're the one trying to cherry pick the low stats from England, which the study itself (that you obviously didn't read, just skimmed to find your stat) believes is due to poor reporting in England. It's only called out as the first point in the conclusion section.


Look, bro, clearly rugby has less problems with CTE. I mean, they haven't even done a study on it, so clearly it's not an issue.

/this is what dumbass rugby fans actually believe
//many also believe that football players should remove helmets from the equation to reduce concussions
///because people weren't dying of head injuries playing the sport - and that was BEFORE forward passing and the era of 250-lb men running 4.4 40s
 
2014-07-29 07:33:35 PM  
You guys keep saying "Rugby" but you never clarify if you mean Union or League.

I am told they are very different.
 
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