Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AZCentral)   With all the things kids have to learn today in order to be competitive in a global economy, why are schools still teaching cursive writing?   (azcentral.com ) divider line
    More: Silly  
•       •       •

4465 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jul 2014 at 8:21 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



324 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-07-27 08:53:13 PM  

Harry_Seldon: DeathRaySanta: Guilty_plea_bargain: gingerjet: The most useless thing I was taught in school?  Cursive writing.  The most useful thing I was taught in school?  Keyboarding.

The most useless thing I was taught in school. Algebra.

Here's what somebody pointed out to me, many summers ago:

Have somebody stand a short distance away, and toss a baseball to you.

You track the ball's trajectory, and successfully catch it.

Congradulations! You've just done introductory trig.

Actually, it is Calculus. Newtonian mechanics to be specific.


faculty.washington.edu
 
2014-07-27 08:53:36 PM  

gingerjet: The most useless thing I was taught in school?  Cursive writing.  The most useful thing I was taught in school?  Keyboarding.


I agree that typing was the most important skill I learned in school. It got me my first job, which eventually led to working and living in Europe for more than 25 years, including a stint as personal secretary to a president. I got to go places I never even dreamed about, like the dinner for Nobel prize winners hosted by the King and Queen of Swedeniana. And after I went to those places, I was able to write nice thank you notes, in the flowing cursive handwriting hammered into me (almost literally, on my knuckles, with a ruler) by my third-grade teacher.

Even if cursive writing won't be need in the brave new world, I'd be sorry if they would stop teaching it.
 
2014-07-27 08:53:54 PM  
My son is going in to his Sophomore year of HS, and he says they don't teach it, because no one uses it. I beg to differ, but then again, I'm old-ish.
 
2014-07-27 08:54:36 PM  
Ehcks,
Enemabag Jones: What is the difference between a signature and cursive. Isn't cursive a gateway drug to an original personal signature? If cursive isn't taught then where do signatures come from?
\I know this sounds like a troll, but it really isn't.
From now on, my signature is my name in military block lettering. Just for you.


I really like that.
 
2014-07-27 08:55:22 PM  

Tom_Slick: Because it is important to be able to read what is written on the back of old family photographs.

/Amongst my grandmother's photos are notes written in Shorthand describing the location and subjects of the photos (she was a legal secretary) my mother kept saying she needed to translate those, unfortunately she passed away before doing so.


I hope you realize that your mother and grandmother weren't the only two people in the world that can/could read shorthand.
Take them to a retirement home, and I'm sure some nice old secretary could help you out.
 
2014-07-27 08:55:55 PM  
japanesethegame.com
 
2014-07-27 08:56:32 PM  

gingerjet: The most useless thing I was taught in school?  Cursive writing.  The most useful thing I was taught in school?  Keyboarding.


I grew up in the days when typing was taught in school as an elective.  I never took any formal course in typing, yet I went into the IT profession as a programmer.


/Can type very well for being self-taught
//Am not a hunt and peckerer
 
2014-07-27 08:57:56 PM  
Cursive.... that's about as useful as teaching them buggy whip manufacturing.
 
2014-07-27 08:58:47 PM  
I thought they had already dropped cursive in many areas.
I'm an engineer. My writing is so bad even I can't read it sometimes. Years of teachers trying to improve it didn't work. I was doomed from the start.
 
2014-07-27 08:59:28 PM  

ChrisDe: At some point in your life, somebody is going to write you a check. And you damned well should be able to sign it.


Not really. If Bubba can make his mark in front of a couple witnesses then that's legally binding.
 
2014-07-27 08:59:39 PM  

Oldiron_79: Cursive.... that's about as useful as teaching them buggy whip manufacturing.


Unless they're Amish.
 
2014-07-27 08:59:47 PM  
Incidentally, apart from my signature (which has degenerated to a barely modulated squiggle), I generally handwrite in print letters, for which I am generally praised for readability. My cursive, by contrast, was barely legible if I really worked at it.

I actually practiced calligraphy a bit when I was a kid, but even then I tended to favor block-letter styles over cursive. Yes, blotting was a problem.

I do think it's appropriate to require school students to acquire some manner of handwriting skill - it's just that in an era of ballpoint pens, I don't see any point in it being cursive.
 
2014-07-27 09:00:03 PM  
TomD9938 ,
Not sure if those are statements or questions exactly.
I will say that in the early / mid eighties, most guys would say there was no good reason to take a typing class (save for journo - wannabees). Of course none of us imagined the time we'd ultimately put in over a keyboard.
As an aside, my dad (born 1936) was a hard drinking high school drop out who made his living with his hands as an auto mechanic and later as a general contractor.
As rough as his origins were and as limited as his education, he had positively beautiful hand writing.


I get it. I took a typing class just when the PC was coming of age, a few years behind you. And yeah, it had was probably a 4 to 5 females to one male in that room. If I was born a few years earlier I might have worked ten or fifteen years on a shop floor until those jobs dried up.

They were not proper gear heads, nor am I.
 
2014-07-27 09:00:41 PM  
Maybe we should start taxing the crap out of companies which offshore jobs and stop passing out thousands of H1B visas so our 7 year olds don't have to worry about competing in a global economy?
 
2014-07-27 09:00:48 PM  
Let's see:

Arguments for cursive: its pretty, easy, and backwards compatible.

Arguments against: its unnessesary and outdated.

Anything else?
 
2014-07-27 09:01:59 PM  

jst3p: I would rather take the time they use to teach cursive and use it to teach HTML or any scripting.


Even Spencerian script?
 
2014-07-27 09:02:25 PM  
Oh, THIS article again.
 
2014-07-27 09:02:29 PM  
I don't care if you write with it, but you sure as fark better be able to read it.  Want a career in the medical field? (and yes that means you " DeVry University medical billing and coding specialists" You sure as hell better be able to read archived records, most of which are hand-written.
 
2014-07-27 09:02:38 PM  
Anyone can use cursive but it'll be great if they stop teaching it.  THAT way you'll be able to tell who had a private school education and who hadda settle for public school.

Middle Class' death by a thousand cuts.
 
2014-07-27 09:02:58 PM  
It is mildly useful for deciphering pre-typed writing (like old photos or historical records), and it's a useful enough skill to have for a well-rounded person.

If we're REALLY so pressed for time in the educational system, let's have a national standardized test and throw out all the state/regional/corporate ones. One test, lasting no more than 2 days of school at the beginning and one at the end of the year. Everything else gets tossed into a giant bonfire, including the administrators who need more tests to justify more specialized textbooks from the salesperson with a kickback incentive.
 
2014-07-27 09:04:25 PM  
Moore importantly why ain't they teaching sext texting.
 
2014-07-27 09:04:25 PM  

Wangiss: [japanesethegame.com image 850x729]


Cursive had it's day pre-computer. And while yours is exceptional (I can read it with no issues whatsoever, yes that's the definition of exceptional now) a) how many seconds did it take you to write that and b) do you usually want/need it for another purpose?

My cursive is non-existent anymore. I don't even fully sign my name, just my initials with a ~ at the end.
 
2014-07-27 09:05:38 PM  

ajgeek: it's


ITS, ITS!

/goddamnitsomuch
 
2014-07-27 09:05:49 PM  
So when someone hands you a handwritten in an important meeting you don't have to say, "Sorry, I don't read cursive".
 
2014-07-27 09:06:29 PM  

UsikFark: A mix of cursive and print letters is the sign of educated, efficient handwriting. Meanwhile, I know people born just a few years after me who write their (print) letters like crooked tombstones in a graveyard.

Here is an example of the sort of cursive/print hybrid:
[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x278]
That is not the best handwriting, but you can tell they learned cursive and still link frequent letter pairs.


And it works your brain in a way that typing on a keyboard doesn't. The physical gesture of writing out information lodges it in your brain, and parsing wiggly symbols exercises more of your brain than scanning Arial.

Like all apparently "boring" and "useless" topics, it might be helpful if it was taught in an interesting and practical way, for example as an art--from calligraphy to graffiti to creating ciphers. The history of letterforms is pretty interesting too.
 
2014-07-27 09:07:58 PM  
No Rachel Jeantel? Fark I am disappoint.
 
2014-07-27 09:09:05 PM  
Cursive should be outlawed.  It has not place in modern society.  Nobody writes it the same way and it's damn near impossible to read most people's cursive.  Communication needs to be sent as well asreceived, and cursive prevents the reception of said communication, it should not be used.

Yeah, yeah.  I get that it's supposedly beautiful.  I get that some can use cursive faster than printing.

But it's an impediment to communication and inefficient.  It has no place in modern communication and is a waste to teach.
 
2014-07-27 09:09:06 PM  
So they can read Grandpa's letters home from the war?
 
2014-07-27 09:10:14 PM  

TomD9938: gingerjet: The most useless thing I was taught in school?  Cursive writing.  The most useful thing I was taught in school?  Keyboarding.

We called that Typing Class and it was mainly for girls and the kind of guys who weren't interested in taking a shop class (if you know what I mean).


FTA :   "It's hard because you have to keep the pen down and connect the letters," said Luis Carlos Miranda

Here's the thing Luis.  You have to be able to write in order to consult with an attorney.


In my Junior year of HS, I enlisted in the Army.  A requirement for my MOS was a typing class. I lied and said I had it.  My schedule was already full of STEM courses so I canceled a half year of lunch period to get a typing class.  I have never used it since.  As a teletypewriter repairman, all I needed to know was how to hit two characters in alternation repeatedly since they are exact opposites in transmitted code and tests all the circuitry and most of the mechanics.  X-Y-X-Y-X-Y-X-Y.  The rest of the mechanics was tested by typing "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog's back."
 
2014-07-27 09:11:13 PM  
Should we teach cursive writing in public schools?  That depends on what your vision of a successful student is- a useful worker bee, trained for whatever skills the corporate world needs for present technology and in the immediate future, who are fungible commodities to be discarded when technological changes require new skills that they will demand in the newest editions of compliant worker bees possess off the shelf; or
young people with a broad basic education- one that includes the foundation of American civilization in history, economics, government, music and the arts, mathematics and the basic sciences.  An education that puts American civilization and culture into the global context through instruction comparing and contrasting the US with other cultures and civilizations and one that fosters critical thinking skills, learning at least one other language, how to work cooperatively with others.  Someone with the ability to be an informed and rational voter, with a solid intellectual, philosophical and esthetic basis to grow from who will out compete others in the global economy through flexibility and the capacity to adjust to a changing world.

Teaching cursive writing alone won't determine which course we take, but why we choose to teach it or not teach it, will.
 
2014-07-27 09:11:33 PM  

Caffeine Induced Diarrhea: Let's see:

Arguments for cursive: its pretty, easy, and backwards compatible.

Arguments against: its unnessesary and outdated.

Anything else?

(James, Karin H. an Atwood, Thea P. (2009).The role of sensorimotor learning in the perception of letter-like forms: Tracking the causes of neural specialization for letters. Cognitive Neuropsychology.26 (1), 91-100

.), suggests that cursive can beneficial to cognitive development and the integration of movement control, cognition, and sensation.

Handwriting, in general, is good for neural development, but cursive may be more so because it requires more difficult visual recognition.  James, K.H. and Engelhardt, L. (2013). The effects of handwriting experience on functional brain development in pre-literate children.

Besides that, cursive has been found to be better for students with disabilities like dyslexia because the letters are easier to tell apart.
 
2014-07-27 09:11:52 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=kLR_hIkCO9s# t =70

It might be helpful if you ever find yourself involved in a murder trial.
 
2014-07-27 09:11:57 PM  
Doctors should not be allowed to write in cursive. Their manuscript is difficult enough to read.
 
2014-07-27 09:12:40 PM  

Wangiss: [japanesethegame.com image 850x729]


fontmeme.com
fontmeme.com
fontmeme.com
fontmeme.com
 
2014-07-27 09:13:19 PM  

Harry_Seldon: DeathRaySanta: Guilty_plea_bargain: gingerjet: The most useless thing I was taught in school?  Cursive writing.  The most useful thing I was taught in school?  Keyboarding.

The most useless thing I was taught in school. Algebra.

Here's what somebody pointed out to me, many summers ago:

Have somebody stand a short distance away, and toss a baseball to you.

You track the ball's trajectory, and successfully catch it.

Congradulations! You've just done introductory trig.

Actually, it is Calculus. Newtonian mechanics to be specific.


Ahhh. Ok. Well, perhaps that would explain why I kinda suck at baseball :)
 
2014-07-27 09:13:24 PM  
If you do not learn cursive you cannot read or write cursive.  Duh.
 
2014-07-27 09:13:26 PM  

badhatharry: So when someone hands you a handwritten in an important meeting you don't have to say, "Sorry, I don't read cursive".


That can be a big one.

ajgeek: Wangiss: [japanesethegame.com image 850x729]

Cursive had it's day pre-computer. And while yours is exceptional (I can read it with no issues whatsoever, yes that's the definition of exceptional now) a) how many seconds did it take you to write that and b) do you usually want/need it for another purpose?

My cursive is non-existent anymore. I don't even fully sign my name, just my initials with a ~ at the end.


I'm glad you could read it, though it's really just utilitarian--it's faster to write in cursive if you're used to it. I think being able to read and write at least the last 200 years of your own language should be part of the definition of literacy. a) It took maybe ten seconds; I wasn't timing it. b) No, I don't hand-write for any other purpose than taking notes. I like being able to take notes very quickly and legibly, so I learned how to write quick, legible cursive. It helped me get good grades in school and comes in handy when I want to remember facts and details spoken to me. I am a linguist by trade, and I love writing Japanese with a brush pen. I think preserving these abilities (especially backwards-compatibility) are important enough to justify the small marginal time investment.

But being able to write legibly and quickly is as valuable as speed reading, so if someone can't, I recommend they learn. It takes a few dedicated hours of practice and being comfortable with self-criticism.
 
2014-07-27 09:13:32 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Oh look... it's this thread again


You can post that on every fark thread.
 
2014-07-27 09:14:21 PM  
I've drawn more tiny penises than signed my name
 
2014-07-27 09:14:45 PM  

Number40: Cursive should be outlawed.  It has not place in modern society.  Nobody writes it the same way and it's damn near impossible to read most people's cursive.  Communication needs to be sent as well asreceived, and cursive prevents the reception of said communication, it should not be used.

Yeah, yeah.  I get that it's supposedly beautiful.  I get that some can use cursive faster than printing.

But it's an impediment to communication and inefficient.  It has no place in modern communication and is a waste to teach.


Ummmm...if they taught it to them properly, you should be able to read it. People still need to sign documents.

WelldeadLink: So they can read Grandpa's letters home from the war?


I had my great-great grandfather's letters from the Civil War. I donated them to a museum. He actually had beautifully clear handwriting. I gave a letter to my cousin that was from my our great-great-great grandmother to our great-grandmother (granddaughter of said greatx3). Anyway, that letter was impossible, though. It was written in French by someone whose first language was German and her handwriting wasn't as clear.
 
2014-07-27 09:15:37 PM  
How can any adult lack the skill to write in cursive?

I say this as someone who was told in the 1st grade that I had worse penmanship ever seen by the teacher.

It hasn't gotten much neater in 40 years.

I can apply myself and do it with precision when the occasion requires, though.  It's an old-fashioned method of writing that should not die through laziness.
 
2014-07-27 09:15:48 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: D'Nealian


ecmoRandomNumbers: I'm going to give you the same answer I gave my coworkers when I was teaching in Phoenix when they didn't want to teach D'Nealian writing. Those kids can produce the most beautiful graffiti. It's art. Truly.

All you need to do is apply some freaking pressure. Many of my former students have beautiful cursive writing.


D'Nealian is crap. Those kids will never, ever print properly now. Start with a good draftsman print and then move to cursive if someone feels it's really necessary. Skip the D'Nealian crap...

Guy was a narcissist too, from Wiki: D'Nealian was developed by Donald Thurber, who developed the system while teaching in a primary school and was first introduced in 1978. The name of the script comes from Donald's first name contracted with his middle name ("Neal").
 
2014-07-27 09:16:37 PM  
Ahhhh cursive... one of those things old people insist young people keep doing because it  is what they remember having to do in their youth. Why not teach them buggy-whip handling and horse hitching while we're at it.
 
2014-07-27 09:17:30 PM  
Simpsons did it?
s30.postimg.org
 
2014-07-27 09:17:42 PM  
Do they still make you write that paragraph in cursive for the SAT? I was convinced that's how they graded you. The bubbles are lies.
 
2014-07-27 09:18:01 PM  

mongbiohazard: Ahhhh cursive... one of those things old people insist young people keep doing because it  is what they remember having to do in their youth. Why not teach them buggy-whip handling and horse hitching while we're at it.


These are probably the same people who hate Common Core because math happens in lines and squares.
 
2014-07-27 09:18:50 PM  
The same reason racism cannot be eliminated in one generation.  In before the Morse code remorse crowd.
 
2014-07-27 09:19:40 PM  

Number40: Cursive should be outlawed.  It has not place in modern society.  Nobody writes it the same way and it's damn near impossible to read most people's cursive.  Communication needs to be sent as well asreceived, and cursive prevents the reception of said communication, it should not be used.

Yeah, yeah.  I get that it's supposedly beautiful.  I get that some can use cursive faster than printing.

But it's an impediment to communication and inefficient.  It has no place in modern communication and is a waste to teach.


Should analog clocks be outlawed?
 
2014-07-27 09:20:44 PM  

symptomoftheuniverse: Tom_Slick: Because it is important to be able to read what is written on the back of old family photographs.

/Amongst my grandmother's photos are notes written in Shorthand describing the location and subjects of the photos (she was a legal secretary) my mother kept saying she needed to translate those, unfortunately she passed away before doing so.

I hope you realize that your mother and grandmother weren't the only two people in the world that can/could read shorthand.
Take them to a retirement home, and I'm sure some nice old secretary could help you out.


I need to get that done, but I haven't.
 
2014-07-27 09:21:14 PM  
I can write cursive faster than I can write manuscript , and I can do both of these faster than I can type on an iPad or similar (though I'm fastest at typing on a real keyboard.). When I'm on rounds and I'm trying to do five things at once, it 's helpful to be able to quickly reduce the spoken word to written form.

So that 's why I think cursive is still important.
 
Displayed 50 of 324 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report