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(BusinessWeek)   Consumerist Wars II: The Wrath of Conn's   (businessweek.com) divider line 16
    More: Followup  
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2078 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Jul 2014 at 10:29 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-27 08:03:25 PM  
"I signed a contract saying zero interest if I paid all my bills on time. I threw a hissy fit when my product needed a repair and broke the contract by refusing to pay on time. Now Conn's is holding me to the contract after repairing my product in good faith and communicating with me each step of the way! WAAAHHHHH....!"
 
2014-07-27 10:35:57 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: "I signed a contract saying zero interest if I paid all my bills on time. I threw a hissy fit when my product needed a repair and broke the contract by refusing to pay on time. Now Conn's is holding me to the contract after repairing my product in good faith and communicating with me each step of the way! WAAAHHHHH....!"


Not only that, but they're refusing to talk to this random person who keeps calling them about my credit account even though I sent them a note saying they could.

Protip: Credit companies and banks usually require a little more than a note before they can discuss your account with a third party.
 
2014-07-27 10:57:04 PM  
I see that the entire discussion of the situation has been covered. So, I propose we turn this thread into.. hmm.. food photos? Anyone make anything cool over the weekend?
 
2014-07-27 10:59:39 PM  
The original was better.
 
2014-07-27 11:08:16 PM  
That what she gets for going to the nations 3rd biggest newspaper.   If she had gone to the biggest, things would have no doubt turned out the same.
 
2014-07-27 11:17:16 PM  
FTA:
" As any good reporter would do in this situation, Segal began reaching out to Conn's to get its side of the story. The company, however, flat out refused to talk to him. Segal called numerous executives, including Poppe, at the office and then started phoning them at their homes. He reached out to board members. Most of the calls went to assistants or voice-mail accounts and were never returned. Some people promised to call Segal back and never did. Segal encouraged his readers to call, e-mail, and tweet at Conn's and get the company to respond. "

Yep, that sounds reasonable, call up executives and board members (who likely have no idea what goes on at the ground level in their stores) at their homes.
 
2014-07-27 11:20:03 PM  
Conn was Conan's son, though not from the original REH stories, iirc
 
2014-07-27 11:55:47 PM  
There's something like nomitive determinism that keeps me out of stores named Conns, just like I wouldn't choose to go to Dr. Quack (the name of my dad's family physician in the 60s.)

But the lady was in the wrong. When the fridge failed her trouble was with the manufacturer, not the financier.
Also, what was the punitive interest rate?
 
2014-07-28 02:47:47 AM  

Katie98_KT: I see that the entire discussion of the situation has been covered. So, I propose we turn this thread into.. hmm.. food photos? Anyone make anything cool over the weekend?


yet to be covered is the notion that this guy gets to write articles that only sum up an actual journalist's articles about a topic.  this is like a descriptive sports box score result.
 
2014-07-28 05:42:40 AM  

wildcardjack: Also, what was the punitive interest rate?


If my math is right, 20.9%, which is about what I would expect form one of these deals.
 
2014-07-28 05:49:39 AM  

rugman11: Protip: Credit companies and banks usually require a little more than a note before they can discuss your account with a third party.


Protip: The no they don't. The might ask that you use their specific form to satisfy their legal department, but if they don't have a policy that allows consumers to designate an advocate in writing they are probably trying to screw you. There is no legitimate reason to refuse to talk to a consumer advocate after privacy concerns have been waived in a legally defensible way.
 
2014-07-28 08:07:55 AM  

wildcardjack: There's something like nomitive determinism that keeps me out of stores named Conns, just like I wouldn't choose to go to Dr. Quack (the name of my dad's family physician in the 60s.)

But the lady was in the wrong. When the fridge failed her trouble was with the manufacturer, not the financier.
Also, what was the punitive interest rate?


In my county, the coroner is Scott Grim, but of course you don't have much of a choice if he sees you or not.
 
2014-07-28 09:36:20 AM  

profplump: rugman11: Protip: Credit companies and banks usually require a little more than a note before they can discuss your account with a third party.

Protip: The no they don't. The might ask that you use their specific form to satisfy their legal department, but if they don't have a policy that allows consumers to designate an advocate in writing they are probably trying to screw you. There is no legitimate reason to refuse to talk to a consumer advocate after privacy concerns have been waived in a legally defensible way.


I've had to do this a lot with bills and loans that are in my wife's name only.  Every time they've required her to be on the phone in order to verify personal information and then to personally okay me as an authorized user on the account.  Maybe Conn's is different, but it doesn't surprise me at all if they had a similar requirement.
 
2014-07-28 10:06:45 AM  

Katie98_KT: I see that the entire discussion of the situation has been covered. So, I propose we turn this thread into.. hmm.. food photos? Anyone make anything cool over the weekend?


How about cleavage?

cdn.funnie.st
 
2014-07-28 11:29:47 AM  
If she had cancer and skipped a payment, I assume the Fark consumer white knight brigade would be out in droves to remind us how it is a terrible move for a company to enforce its contractual policies.
 
2014-07-28 11:36:52 AM  

SCUBA_Archer: If she had cancer and skipped a payment, I assume the Fark consumer white knight brigade would be out in droves to remind us how it is a terrible move for a company to enforce its contractual policies.


Having cancer and being upset because your fridge broke are two different situations.  She made a conscious choice not to pay her bill so getting hit with the interest shouldn't be a surprise.  Do not fark with those 0% interest deals.  You get your math wrong by a penny and you'll pay hundreds in interest.  I have a similar deal with Mor Furniture at the moment, and I recheck my math every month.
 
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