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(Wired)   Study finds five fold increase in "nightmare bacteria" in Southern hospitals. No need for concern though as the study likely wildly underestimates the problem   (wired.com) divider line 22
    More: Scary, Southeastern United States, bacteria, infection control, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Academic Health Science Centre, Enterobacteriaceae  
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1592 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Jul 2014 at 3:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-27 02:21:39 PM  
56 percent were associated with nursing homes.


Oh, who cares because:

img0.joyreactor.cc
 
2014-07-27 03:26:05 PM  
Note to South: Not believing in evolution doesn't make it go away.
 
2014-07-27 03:33:52 PM  
Good way to get rid of the South.Bonus, won't spread beyond because they don't mix outside their "own kind"
 
2014-07-27 03:58:07 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Note to South: Not believing in evolution doesn't make it go away.


Beat me to it.
 
2014-07-27 04:10:29 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Note to South: Not believing in evolution doesn't make it go away.


rogue49: Good way to get rid of the South.Bonus, won't spread beyond because they don't mix outside their "own kind"


BMFPitt: Mad_Radhu: Note to South: Not believing in evolution doesn't make it go away.

Beat me to it.


Good stuff.  Irony abounds.
 
2014-07-27 04:20:20 PM  
So now we know what "Southern Hospitality" really means.
 
2014-07-27 04:26:46 PM  
Which one turns the Zombie Factor on?
 
2014-07-27 04:32:33 PM  

2wolves: Which one turns the Zombie Factor on?


butter
 
2014-07-27 04:38:51 PM  
If we stopped using antibiotics for a while would the non-resistant strains multiply up and take over from the resistant ones, or would it just let a super population of resistant bacteria grow everywhere?
 
2014-07-27 05:07:05 PM  
The Bacteria of Northern Aggression will not prevail!
 
2014-07-27 05:10:59 PM  

Slaxl: If we stopped using antibiotics for a while would the non-resistant strains multiply up and take over from the resistant ones, or would it just let a super population of resistant bacteria grow everywhere?


Usually, resistant strains of bacteria have slightly higher energy requirements, so that they are at an evolutionary disadvantage. When the pressure is removed, they are selected against, and the non-resistant strains become more prevalent again. There would still be a few resistant specimens in the population, and resistance would crop up more quickly.
 
2014-07-27 06:13:07 PM  

Slaxl: If we stopped using antibiotics for a while would the non-resistant strains multiply up and take over from the resistant ones, or would it just let a super population of resistant bacteria grow everywhere?


Resistance would be futile.
 
2014-07-27 06:52:03 PM  

New Farkin User Name: Slaxl: If we stopped using antibiotics for a while would the non-resistant strains multiply up and take over from the resistant ones, or would it just let a super population of resistant bacteria grow everywhere?

Usually, resistant strains of bacteria have slightly higher energy requirements, so that they are at an evolutionary disadvantage. When the pressure is removed, they are selected against, and the non-resistant strains become more prevalent again. There would still be a few resistant specimens in the population, and resistance would crop up more quickly.


Well, yes, but more importantly: If bacteria learn a new trick that's only useful in particular spots, that trick will never take over the world the same way as resistance against a threat that's everywhere. It'll never be as useful.

So all of bacterias' tricks against various other common microbes tend to be pretty widespread and common among bacteria all over the world. (Which makes me wonder if penicillin resistance is spreading, since penicillin is everywhere. My first guess would be no, however, because that's not the strategy bacteria and yeasts have pursued against penicillin's relatives: Their membrane growth phase is also their suck-up-mold-toxins-and-immobilize-them-in-my-skin phase. It's a pretty neat trick.)
 
2014-07-27 07:07:40 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: New Farkin User Name: Slaxl: If we stopped using antibiotics for a while would the non-resistant strains multiply up and take over from the resistant ones, or would it just let a super population of resistant bacteria grow everywhere?

Usually, resistant strains of bacteria have slightly higher energy requirements, so that they are at an evolutionary disadvantage. When the pressure is removed, they are selected against, and the non-resistant strains become more prevalent again. There would still be a few resistant specimens in the population, and resistance would crop up more quickly.

Well, yes, but more importantly: If bacteria learn a new trick that's only useful in particular spots, that trick will never take over the world the same way as resistance against a threat that's everywhere. It'll never be as useful.

So all of bacterias' tricks against various other common microbes tend to be pretty widespread and common among bacteria all over the world. (Which makes me wonder if penicillin resistance is spreading, since penicillin is everywhere. My first guess would be no, however, because that's not the strategy bacteria and yeasts have pursued against penicillin's relatives: Their membrane growth phase is also their suck-up-mold-toxins-and-immobilize-them-in-my-skin phase. It's a pretty neat trick.)


Bacteria exchange resistances through plasmids. You can end up with resistances in populations never exposed to the drug or other condition. They evolve laterally as well as longitudinally.
 
2014-07-27 08:42:41 PM  

BolloxReader: Bacteria exchange resistances through plasmids. You can end up with resistances in populations never exposed to the drug or other condition. They evolve laterally as well as longitudinally.


Yeah but are those resistances worth having? That will decide persistence in population.
 
2014-07-27 11:07:01 PM  
I've always wondered if conventional antibiotics stopped working if people would opt for colloidal silver based treatments.

Maybe you'd end up looking like Commander Data, but at least you'd be alive.
 
2014-07-27 11:31:53 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: BolloxReader: Bacteria exchange resistances through plasmids. You can end up with resistances in populations never exposed to the drug or other condition. They evolve laterally as well as longitudinally.

Yeah but are those resistances worth having? That will decide persistence in population.


Some of the Scandinavian countries have made a special effort to halt the over-prescription of antibiotics of all sorts in their ebil socialized medical system and seen a reduction in the percentage of infections that are antibiotic resistant.
 
2014-07-28 02:17:50 AM  
Since evolution is a lie, Jesus must've put those bacteria there.
 
2014-07-28 03:21:59 AM  
my grandfather died a horrible, months-long death in north carolina after getting a bacterial infection from a hip replacement, so i'm really getting a kick...
 
2014-07-28 02:07:14 PM  

BullBearMS: Some of the Scandinavian countries have made a special effort to halt the over-prescription of antibiotics of all sorts in their ebil socialized medical system and seen a reduction in the percentage of infections that are antibiotic resistant.


Intredasting. Well there's yer answer Slaxl.
 
2014-07-28 05:29:15 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: I've always wondered if conventional antibiotics stopped working if people would opt for colloidal silver based treatments.

Maybe you'd end up looking like Commander Data, but at least you'd be alive.


You want to look grey AND take something that medical science has established does nothing?  Hey, knock yourself out.
 
2014-07-28 07:01:19 PM  

dahmers love zombie: Vlad_the_Inaner: I've always wondered if conventional antibiotics stopped working if people would opt for colloidal silver based treatments.

Maybe you'd end up looking like Commander Data, but at least you'd be alive.

You want to look grey AND take something that medical science has established does nothing?  Hey, knock yourself out.


Sure dude, science like THIS says 'does nothing, exactly 'does nothing' and nothing but "does nothing" (eye roll)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16766878

Abstract
Silver has a long and intriguing history as an antibiotic in human health care. It has been developed for use in water purification, wound care, bone prostheses, reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, cardiac devices, catheters and surgical appliances. Advancing biotechnology has enabled incorporation of ionizable silver into fabrics for clinical use to reduce the risk of nosocomial infections and for personal hygiene. The antimicrobial action of silver or silver compounds is proportional to the bioactive silver ion (Ag(+)) released and its availability to interact with bacterial or fungal cell membranes. Silver metal and inorganic silver compounds ionize in the presence of water, body fluids or tissue exudates. The silver ion is biologically active and readily interacts with proteins, amino acid residues, free anions and receptors on mammalian and eukaryotic cell membranes. Bacterial (and probably fungal) sensitivity to silver is genetically determined and relates to the levels of intracellular silver uptake and its ability to interact and irreversibly denature key enzyme systems. Silver exhibits low toxicity in the human body, and minimal risk is expected due to clinical exposure by inhalation, ingestion, dermal application or through the urological or haematogenous route. Chronic ingestion or inhalation of silver preparations (especially colloidal silver) can lead to deposition of silver metal/silver sulphide particles in the skin (argyria), eye (argyrosis) and other organs. These are not life-threatening conditions but cosmetically undesirable. Silver is absorbed into the human body and enters the systemic circulation as a protein complex to be eliminated by the liver and kidneys. Silver metabolism is modulated by induction and binding to metallothioneins. This complex mitigates the cellular toxicity of silver and contributes to tissue repair. Silver allergy is a known contra-indication for using silver in medical devices or antibiotic textiles.
 
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