Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(io9)   We've studied Mars for decades, but still have no major theories. What's up with that?   (io9.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, clay minerals, NASA, Marie Curie, stream channel, planetary geologist, Planetary Science  
•       •       •

3310 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Jul 2014 at 3:12 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



59 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-07-26 09:40:43 PM  
Struggling to explain it....
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-26 10:15:38 PM  
Theories about what exactly?
 
2014-07-26 10:22:08 PM  
We're not wanted there
www.badmovies.org
That's my theory, and I'm stickin' to it
 
2014-07-26 11:41:17 PM  
I had a guy that tried to get me to invest in a Venus terraforming company, once.
I hate high pressure salesmen.
 
2014-07-27 12:10:54 AM  

bearded clamorer: I had a guy that tried to get me to invest in a Venus terraforming company, once.
I hate high pressure salesmen.


Ha!  I actually got that joke.
 
2014-07-27 12:58:48 AM  
We have to wait until we get there and then, several centuries later, we'll have our great theory -- Human activity had totally farked up the planet.
 
2014-07-27 01:12:27 AM  

queezyweezel: Theories about what exactly?


img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-27 02:18:44 AM  
That's because The Shadows keep their secrets safe...
 
2014-07-27 02:19:35 AM  
Well, that or the Prothean machinery keeps messing up with our tech...
 
433 [TotalFark]
2014-07-27 02:20:37 AM  

hubiestubert: That's because The Shadows keep their secrets safe...


We have to go to Mars to find out what evil lurks in the hearts of men?
 
2014-07-27 03:18:25 AM  

433: hubiestubert: That's because The Shadows keep their secrets safe...

We have to go to Mars to find out what evil lurks in the hearts of men?


No.

we have to go to mars to find out the answer: "what do you want?"
 
2014-07-27 03:23:57 AM  
 
2014-07-27 03:28:10 AM  
I have a theory.

Mars is thin at the top end, much MUCH thicker in the middle, and then thin again at the bottom end.

Well, this theory that I have--that is to say, which is mine-- ...is mine.

Ms. Anne Elk (deceased)
 
2014-07-27 03:28:57 AM  

bearded clamorer: I had a guy that tried to get me to invest in a Venus terraforming company, once.
I hate high pressure salesmen.


I chuckled out loud.
 
2014-07-27 03:50:26 AM  
We have yet to get our ass there.
 
2014-07-27 04:03:48 AM  

The Gentleman Caller: We have yet to get our ass there.


Brings back memories.  A good movie, if I Rekall correctly.
 
2014-07-27 04:14:46 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-27 04:24:22 AM  

Wolf892: I have a theory, it could be bunnies...


And what's with all the carrots? What do they need such good eyesight for anyway?
 
2014-07-27 04:29:29 AM  
One of our theories is that the chances of anything coming from mars are a million to one.

/ At least, that's what they said.
 
2014-07-27 04:35:12 AM  

Wolf892: robohobo: Wolf892: I have a theory, it could be bunnies...

And what's with all the carrots? What do they need such good eyesight for anyway?

That settles it, bunnies, it must be bunnies! Or... maybe demons?


There was no pain. I live in hell, because I've been expelled from heaven. I think I was in heaven.
 
2014-07-27 04:42:49 AM  
Just as an aside, I thought this was rather nice.

lightlybuzzed.com
 
2014-07-27 04:50:29 AM  

Kittypie070: Just as an aside, I thought this was rather nice.

[lightlybuzzed.com image 480x360]


SpaceX will probably have a different tread.
 
2014-07-27 05:16:57 AM  
 
2014-07-27 05:44:03 AM  
mimg.ugo.com

\knows the answers
\\will tell them to you, if you let him touch you
(in your mind)
 
2014-07-27 05:44:29 AM  

DORMAMU: 433: hubiestubert: That's because The Shadows keep their secrets safe...

We have to go to Mars to find out what evil lurks in the hearts of men?

No.

we have to go to mars to find out the answer: "what do you want?"


The answer is "Yes."  ;)
 
2014-07-27 06:25:52 AM  
I blame the Heliumites.  Especially that bastard,  Mors Kajack. He's always trying to keep the Green Man down.

/And I totally want my radium pistol.
 
2014-07-27 06:39:03 AM  
 
2014-07-27 06:49:00 AM  
We do know, however, that it's happy.

yeinjee.com
 
2014-07-27 07:35:38 AM  
We've been studying it, but we don't know that much.
Trying to do everything by probe is like trying to drain a lake through a soda straw. We're getting a grainy view of a handful of rocks per decade when what you need is a full multi-team geological crawl across different areas.

We spent a long time looking at the moon too, but the better theories about its origins didn't come about until we sent a geologist up who could look around and make sense of the data.
Even then it was only a handful of samples and few sites checked, so the theories are still incomplete.
 
2014-07-27 07:37:54 AM  

studebaker hoch: One of our theories is that the chances of anything coming from mars are a million to one.

/ At least, that's what they said.


But still, they come.
 
2014-07-27 07:51:10 AM  

studebaker hoch: One of our theories is that the chances of anything coming from mars are a million to one.

/ At least, that's what they said.


i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-27 07:56:07 AM  

queezyweezel: Theories about what exactly?

Well if you RTFA, they can't reconcile why Mars was supposedly once a warm, wet planet.  GHGs don't go far enough but we've dug up rocks for which the only known natural process of creation involves liquid water.

Thing is, to get a comprehensive geological history of a planet, you need a LOT of data.  Not least among the reasons is that five billion years is a pretty long diary to read through when the planet only speaks through mineral formations.
 
2014-07-27 08:21:37 AM  

dragonchild: queezyweezel: Theories about what exactly?
Well if you RTFA, they can't reconcile why Mars was supposedly once a warm, wet planet.  GHGs don't go far enough but we've dug up rocks for which the only known natural process of creation involves liquid water.

Thing is, to get a comprehensive geological history of a planet, you need a LOT of data.  Not least among the reasons is that five billion years is a pretty long diary to read through when the planet only speaks through mineral formations.


Question for any planetary scientists lurking about: Is there any chance that the orbit of Mars was once closer to the Sun as an explanation for a warmer past? I remember reading that because of a tidal resonance between Jupiter and Saturn, Neptune was pushed past Uranus, but I have no idea if that was even possible(let alone happened) with Mars*.

*that Mars was once closer, then moved to present orbit, not pushed past Uranus

/and just to be infantile... Uranus ;p
 
2014-07-27 08:30:59 AM  
That's just what they want you to think.
 
2014-07-27 08:38:24 AM  

DORMAMU: 433: hubiestubert: That's because The Shadows keep their secrets safe...

We have to go to Mars to find out what evil lurks in the hearts of men?

No.

we have to go to mars to find out the answer: "what do you want?"


I want to live just long enough to see them put your head on a pike as a warning to the next ten generations that some favours come with two high a price.  I want to look up into your lifeless eyes and wave, just like this.

*cutesy wave*

Can your associates do that for me, Mr. Morden?

/he was the only one who got what he wanted
//I'm impressed by the sheer density of references in this thread.  Good job, everyone.
 
2014-07-27 08:43:32 AM  

mutterfark: dragonchild: queezyweezel: Theories about what exactly?
Well if you RTFA, they can't reconcile why Mars was supposedly once a warm, wet planet.  GHGs don't go far enough but we've dug up rocks for which the only known natural process of creation involves liquid water.

Thing is, to get a comprehensive geological history of a planet, you need a LOT of data.  Not least among the reasons is that five billion years is a pretty long diary to read through when the planet only speaks through mineral formations.

Question for any planetary scientists lurking about: Is there any chance that the orbit of Mars was once closer to the Sun as an explanation for a warmer past? I remember reading that because of a tidal resonance between Jupiter and Saturn, Neptune was pushed past Uranus, but I have no idea if that was even possible(let alone happened) with Mars*.

*that Mars was once closer, then moved to present orbit, not pushed past Uranus

/and just to be infantile... Uranus ;p


The thing I heard in college is that Mars lacked a decently sized moon to keep its core running hot. As the core of the planet cooled down, the magnetic forces that protected the atmosphere weakened, and the atmosphere was blown off by solar wind.

That's what makes Jupiter's moons so exciting. plenty of similar sized moons running near collision courses, stretching and pulling the insides and making elastic moons, not to mention the monster of mass that is Jupiter itself.
 
2014-07-27 08:43:49 AM  
Find the caves.
 
2014-07-27 08:54:17 AM  

RowdyRough: The thing I heard in college is that Mars lacked a decently sized moon to keep its core running hot. As the core of the planet cooled down, the magnetic forces that protected the atmosphere weakened, and the atmosphere was blown off by solar wind.

That's what makes Jupiter's moons so exciting. plenty of similar sized moons running near collision courses, stretching and pulling the insides and making elastic moons, not to mention the monster of mass that is Jupiter itself.


I've read that as well. This article seems to be saying that all that we know does not yet account for the length of Mars' warm period. If I read it correctly, they are saying that Mars should never have had an extended warm period. Something the evidence from Curiosity and the rovers seems to contradict. Or I may just as easily have misunderstood what the article was getting at.

/My question isn't even an hypothesis, let alone a theory, just my own curiosity.
 
2014-07-27 10:53:49 AM  
This subject is of great interest to me, as I see Mars as a real possibility for terra/aeroforming.  The idea of an entirely new plant for us to start over on?  Yea, Red Mars IS a great book, the first one for sure, the second probably....

I think the point is that Mars DID or does have water - how or where it went and why is interesting in that it offers the possibility of insight into planetary formation and lifespan.

One of the big frustrations with Robotic exploration is that while it's relatively cheap, the amount of useful data is limited by their protection systems, requiring inch per hour travel rates, etc.  Plus, it's hard to get enough visual input compared to a real-time, trained human observer in-situ - who can observe, analyze, make decisions on the spot and alter plans based on newest information in real time.

The difference between the work done on Apollo 11 vs. 17 was based on time, mobility AND Schmidt, a trained geologist...

Additionally, I just cannot help but place a high value on actually doing the mission and getting there - the learning opportunities and research and development gives me guy-wood to be honest.
 
2014-07-27 10:57:13 AM  
cached.imagescaler.hbpl.co.uk

/...still unknown: why UK Mars are different from US Mars
 
2014-07-27 11:17:52 AM  
Mars ain't the kind of place to raise your kids. They're all thinking of the children.
 
2014-07-27 12:03:00 PM  

nanim: [cached.imagescaler.hbpl.co.uk image 300x198]

/...still unknown: why UK Mars are different from US Mars


They changed them to be like the US ones now. When I went to the UK last year it was very disappointing how nasty they had become.
 
2014-07-27 12:35:44 PM  

way south: We've been studying it, but we don't know that much.
Trying to do everything by probe is like trying to drain a lake through a soda straw. We're getting a grainy view of a handful of rocks per decade when what you need is a full multi-team geological crawl across different areas.

We spent a long time looking at the moon too, but the better theories about its origins didn't come about until we sent a geologist up who could look around and make sense of the data.
Even then it was only a handful of samples and few sites checked, so the theories are still incomplete.


Nope. I can tell you that geologists would be next to useless for a couple of weeks on Mars because of how gravity screws up the human body after being weightless for the six month travel time.

From Chris Hadfield
---
Returning to Earth is a bigger adjustment, because your bones and muscles atrophy when they aren't in use. I lost 8 percent of the bone across my hips, and that's after two hours of exercise every single day in space. I wouldn't have been able to pass a sobriety test for a week after I returned, and it was four months before I could run properly. In that first week, you're lumbering around like a guy in a Godzilla costume.
You also have to readjust mentally. You'll try to float a pen or a water bottle over to someone and watch it clunk to the ground, because you've forgotten about gravity. When I woke up in the morning, I didn't just try to float out of bed -- I was convinced that I was floating above the bed like Sigourney Weaver in Ghostbusters. I literally felt weightless. Your body has just as much trouble adapting to gravity after going without it for five months as it does adapting to the lack of it in the first place.


 -----

What happens when you go to Mars and you're incapacitated for a week or two? How did you plan on staying? Getting back? No. It's currently not practical.

Probes are cheaper, because the getting the answers aren't worth killing geologists.
 
2014-07-27 12:50:04 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-27 01:18:30 PM  

SVenus: way south: We've been studying it, but we don't know that much.
Trying to do everything by probe is like trying to drain a lake through a soda straw. We're getting a grainy view of a handful of rocks per decade when what you need is a full multi-team geological crawl across different areas.

We spent a long time looking at the moon too, but the better theories about its origins didn't come about until we sent a geologist up who could look around and make sense of the data.
Even then it was only a handful of samples and few sites checked, so the theories are still incomplete.

Nope. I can tell you that geologists would be next to useless for a couple of weeks on Mars because of how gravity screws up the human body after being weightless for the six month travel time.

From Chris Hadfield
---
Returning to Earth is a bigger adjustment, because your bones and muscles atrophy when they aren't in use. I lost 8 percent of the bone across my hips, and that's after two hours of exercise every single day in space. I wouldn't have been able to pass a sobriety test for a week after I returned, and it was four months before I could run properly. In that first week, you're lumbering around like a guy in a Godzilla costume.
You also have to readjust mentally. You'll try to float a pen or a water bottle over to someone and watch it clunk to the ground, because you've forgotten about gravity. When I woke up in the morning, I didn't just try to float out of bed -- I was convinced that I was floating above the bed like Sigourney Weaver in Ghostbusters. I literally felt weightless. Your body has just as much trouble adapting to gravity after going without it for five months as it does adapting to the lack of it in the first place.

 -----

What happens when you go to Mars and you're incapacitated for a week or two? How did you plan on staying? Getting back? No. It's currently not practical.

Probes are cheaper, because the getting the answers aren't worth killing geologists.


Ok here's the deal.  We've been able to go to Mars for the better part of 40 years with a manned mission if we simply wanted to.  But to make the most of it we have to begin a dedicated program of actually building infrastructure...or sending infrastructure there to be assembled to make any study of the planet worth while.  On top of that there are reasons to begin exploiting Mars for any resources we can use on Earth.  The lesser gravity of Mars simply makes any launches back to Earth cheaper in terms of fuel use.

Probes can't do what a dedicated mining system can do.  They barely scrape the dirt at this point.  We only accidentally found out about some perchlorate deposits due to a wheel dragging.  Of course the first step should be a permanent base on the moon from which is is very easy to get back from.  Establishing a base there would be obscenely easy by comparison.  There are some groups working on designs for a lunar space elevator that would extend out to one of the lagrangian points between the Earth and the Moon.  So you might ask...what is the profit in going to the moon?  Helium-3 extraction and refining.  Most of it bounces off of Eath's Magnetosphere.  However the moon has no such protective layer and is belted by Helium-3 day in and day out from the stellar wind of our Sun.  That is just one resource that is there...and is constantly refreshed by our star.  It is a fuel that is easily used for fusion.  That would be useful to us on Earth as well as in space

Additional benefits would come from meeting all of these engineering challenges to our society and to the world at large.  The idea of something being expensive is a narrow minded thought.  The question can better be framed by looking at a cost of waiting...and indeed the cost of not acting.  Those costs massively exceed the cost of actually undertaking endeavors like this.  Exploration always has benefited the majority of the human species and always will.
 
2014-07-27 01:28:25 PM  
He doesn't give up his secrets easily.

laserstars.org
 
GBB
2014-07-27 01:44:46 PM  
i1236.photobucket.com
 
2014-07-27 02:25:28 PM  

SVenus: Probes are cheaper, because the getting the answers aren't worth killing geologists.

Getting answers about the history of Mars?  HELL FARKING YEAH that's worth killing geologists.  That's worth killing a small army of geologists on one-way missions and every last one of them would be fighting to get on the wait list.  It may not have any immediate practical application but most of them today are finding tar sands so Midwestern soccer moms can drive their crotchfruit 300 yards to school in a tank for a few cents cheaper.  They wouldn't even need to be alive all that long; the first one to touch soil might re-write half of what we thought we knew in a few weeks.

Real scientists are rather baffling to most people because of their passion.  They have basic human emotions like anyone else, but give them an opportunity to unlock a great mystery and they will happily make sacrifices that would humble the most hardened, elite soldiers on the planet.
 
2014-07-27 02:33:53 PM  

dragonchild: Real scientists are rather baffling to most people because of their passion. They have basic human emotions like anyone else, but give them an opportunity to unlock a great mystery and they will happily make sacrifices that would humble the most hardened, elite soldiers on the planet.


There's a team of physicists studying neutrinos under the ice in Antarctica that would agree with this.

/meanwhile I get annoyed if I have to get up at 4:30 to catch a 6:00 elevator down a mine
 
2014-07-27 02:37:10 PM  
top50sf.files.wordpress.com
 
Displayed 50 of 59 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report