If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Liverpool Echo)   University engineering students build world's fastest bicycle, capable of 90 mph, seek volunteers to test it because they're sure as hell not trusting THEIR lives to this thing (pics)   (liverpoolecho.co.uk) divider line 21
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

4377 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jul 2014 at 6:52 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-26 04:41:50 PM  
I reached 62 mph on a bicycle once. It involved a very long, very steep hill and legs I don't possess anymore.


/csb
 
2014-07-26 07:00:02 PM  
Best fishes.
 
2014-07-26 07:16:16 PM  
curezone.com
 
2014-07-26 07:31:05 PM  
I don't understand.  Isn't the world's fastest bike determined by the person on it and any number of other constantly changing and often impossible to replicate factors?    It's a completely baseless claim that can't be substantiated.  Lightest bike, most aerodynamic bike, etc...those are all claims you could make.
 
2014-07-26 07:31:09 PM  
I hit 45 mph on a flat road once, on an old Schwinn Varsity.

Of course, the 55 mph tailwind might have helped.
 
2014-07-26 07:56:46 PM  

Emposter: I don't understand. Isn't the world's fastest bike determined by the person on it and any number of other constantly changing and often impossible to replicate factors?


The Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) competition rules are very well defined.

Link
 
2014-07-26 08:19:12 PM  

jaytkay: Emposter: I don't understand. Isn't the world's fastest bike determined by the person on it and any number of other constantly changing and often impossible to replicate factors?

The Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) competition rules are very well defined.

Link


None of which address the issue I raised.

For example, given differences in human physiology, such as leg length, weight, strength vs. endurance, etc. the "fastest" bike for one person may not be the fastest for another person.
 
2014-07-26 08:22:42 PM  

cirby: I hit 45 mph on a flat road once, on an old Schwinn Varsity.

Of course, the 55 mph tailwind might have helped.


I'm pretty sure it was just you considering that "tail wind" is a myth.
 
2014-07-26 08:29:32 PM  

Emposter: None of which address the issue I raised.

For example, given differences in human physiology, such as leg length, weight, strength vs. endurance, etc. the "fastest" bike for one person may not be the fastest for another person.


They are trying to break a specific, defined record.

They aren't trying to create a universally "most fastest ever" bike.
 
2014-07-26 09:05:58 PM  

SewerSquirrels: cirby: I hit 45 mph on a flat road once, on an old Schwinn Varsity.

Of course, the 55 mph tailwind might have helped.

I'm pretty sure it was just you considering that "tail wind" is a myth.


Obviously *you've* never eaten at Taco Bell.
 
2014-07-26 09:17:46 PM  
I don't care if I could be the fastest in it, I just want to use the damn thing. That thing looks like a *very* cool way to die.
 
2014-07-26 10:12:25 PM  
I got a flat going 55mph plus down a mountain on my trek road bike. One of the scariest days of my life. Pulled a slight wheelie to keep the front wheel off the ground while I brought it to a manageable speed.  90. No thanks!
 
2014-07-26 10:16:59 PM  
I'm pretty certain Guy Martin managed over 100 mph on his bike slipstreaming behind a semi tractor unit.
 
2014-07-26 10:51:19 PM  

SewerSquirrels: "tail wind" is a myth.


No I'm pretty sure that aerodynamic drag caused by motion through a fluid is proportional to the rate of movement through that fluid.
 
2014-07-26 11:43:53 PM  

Egoy3k: SewerSquirrels: "tail wind" is a myth.

No I'm pretty sure that aerodynamic drag caused by motion through a fluid is proportional to the rate of movement through that fluid.


Air isn't a fluid. You can't drink air.

/check mate, libtard.
//check all detectors before replying.
 
2014-07-27 12:40:22 AM  
Lance Armstrong should get in on this. The wailing and rendering of garments from the outrage brigade would be most amusing.
 
2014-07-27 12:49:57 AM  

Emposter: jaytkay: Emposter: I don't understand. Isn't the world's fastest bike determined by the person on it and any number of other constantly changing and often impossible to replicate factors?

The Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) competition rules are very well defined.

Link

None of which address the issue I raised.

For example, given differences in human physiology, such as leg length, weight, strength vs. endurance, etc. the "fastest" bike for one person may not be the fastest for another person.


For whatever it's worth, you can generally count on these things driven for records by high-level intercollegiate athletes.  Within that group, you will generally see very similar peak performance (for the record attempts being discussed here, it's typically a flying mile or km both ways -- so not a pure sprint, but somewhere on the sprint-to-crit spectrum).

Since the HPV records don't really have much in the way of timing or strategy, you can pretty much model that level of athlete as "can produce X watts for Y seconds".  Since that can actually be measured (even live at the time of the attempt), it might be possible to develop a "standard driver" model (70kg, 300W for 90s, or whatever).

Actually searching around, it seems that elite cyclists can actually hit 2+kW (!) for a few seconds at least, and some posts of 600W for 25min.  Wow.  For comparison, 1hp is about 750W -- so a good pro sprinter is 3-4hp.  Makes the speeds of HPVs even more impressive.

So while your point is definitely something to keep in mind, the end result is that they're going to be driven / powered by a pretty small group of people which don't have a very high variance.  And that also means that a "normal person" won't hit the same speeds, but they'd still go much faster in a streamlined recumbent than on a normal upright bike.

(By comparison, the solar races inevitably use the tiniest drivers they can, to minimize weight.)
 
2014-07-27 12:59:12 AM  

Egoy3k: No I'm pretty sure that aerodynamic drag caused by motion through a fluid is proportional to the rate of movement through that fluid.


One of the earlier hits when I was searching for power numbers indicates that you have the right idea, but it's actually worse than [linear] proportional:

"The drag force due to rolling resistance is proportional to the speed and the drag force due to wind resistance is proportional to the square of the speed.  Since the power is the force times the speed, the power needed to overcome the rolling resistance is proportional to the square of the speed and the power needed to overcome the wind resistances is proportional to the cube of the speed."
-- http://www.recumbents.com/wisil/demma/downhill_physics.htm
 
2014-07-27 01:35:05 AM  

rga184: Egoy3k: SewerSquirrels: "tail wind" is a myth.

No I'm pretty sure that aerodynamic drag caused by motion through a fluid is proportional to the rate of movement through that fluid.

Air isn't a fluid. You can't drink air.

/check mate, libtard.
//check all detectors before replying.


I dare you to drink liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen so we can see if you would break like the T1000 when you fall down.
 
2014-07-27 02:04:47 AM  

Emposter: jaytkay: Emposter: I don't understand. Isn't the world's fastest bike determined by the person on it and any number of other constantly changing and often impossible to replicate factors?

The Human Powered Vehicle (HPV) competition rules are very well defined.

Link

None of which address the issue I raised.

For example, given differences in human physiology, such as leg length, weight, strength vs. endurance, etc. the "fastest" bike for one person may not be the fastest for another person.


You know, you're right!  A bicycle is dependent on the human for speed.  HOORAY FOR YOU!  You sure showed THIS thread who's the most literal!

I bet you're a real hit at parties.
 
2014-07-27 03:43:42 PM  
Diddo, on the fast bike ride...I also tested inertia and luck, because I hit a curb, with the bike coming to an instant stop and me going head over heels over the bar handles...with a full flip landed on grass with my legs straight out front and slid 20 feet...didn't get a bruise on me. Not going to happen with this thing here.
 
Displayed 21 of 21 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report