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(Gawker)   We have officially hit "Peak App"   (valleywag.gawker.com) divider line 52
    More: Spiffy, Apple App Store, mobile apps  
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3371 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jul 2014 at 3:44 PM (13 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-26 02:29:28 PM  
A staggering 47% of app developers either make literally no money, or less than $100 per month, per app.

I would have guessed much higher than 47%.
 
2014-07-26 02:38:50 PM  
Revenue is a feature. Some companies can add it later, others need to work it out early.
- Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)



hahahahahaha  Yeah, ask the 90's how that worked.
 
2014-07-26 02:59:17 PM  

Mentat: Revenue is a feature. Some companies can add it later, others need to work it out early.
- Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)


hahahahahaha  Yeah, ask the 90's how that worked.


Pay me! My code compiles! You can figure out the revenue model later. After you've paid me.
 
2014-07-26 03:50:45 PM  

rumpelstiltskin: Mentat: Revenue is a feature. Some companies can add it later, others need to work it out early.
- Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)


hahahahahaha  Yeah, ask the 90's how that worked.

Pay me! My code compiles! You can figure out the revenue model later. After you've paid me.


I've hired an IBM engineer to build things out of Legos.  I'm paying him $150K a year to do this.  Why?  Because venture capital, fark yeah!
 
2014-07-26 03:58:12 PM  
"The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6% of developers make multiples of the other 98.4% combined."

sounds like my download history on my iphone... first 3 months account for 98.4% of my downloads, after that? nil
 
2014-07-26 04:00:52 PM  
"The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6% of developers make multiples of the other 98.4% combined."

Kinda like the rest of the business world?

I've always hated this phrase, but in this case, it seems appropriate:

Welcome to the real world.
 
2014-07-26 04:08:02 PM  
This can only be good news for Windows Phone, and I'm guessing is why Google is doing everything possible to try to sabotage it.
 
2014-07-26 04:11:46 PM  

haterade69: This can only be good news for Windows Phone, and I'm guessing is why Google is doing everything possible to try to sabotage it.


Why would Google need to try to sabotage Windows Phone?  Isn't that kinda like beating a dead horse?

That being said, it has become standard practise in the electronics business world for everybody to try and sabotage everybody else.
 
2014-07-26 04:16:40 PM  
So you're saying that an industry filled one one hit idea (I hesitate to say good when it includes things like Flappy Bird) and dozens of clones built on that idea means that nobody makes any money? You could probably apply this to any industry where the barrier to entry is basically uploading your work to the App Store or Amazon. I doubt that the thousands of self-published paranormal teen romance ebooks make more than a hundred a month either.

If you make something good and original, people will pay for it. Just be sure to make something that can't be copied in three days by any kid with an SDK like Threes and 1024 (or whatever that rip-off was that became more successful).
 
2014-07-26 04:21:26 PM  
That's why it has been a surge of WP and W8 apps from a bunch recently. These people been so far up Apples and Google's arse they they were blinded by a third mobile OS consumers that is willing to pay for legit better than 2party apps. Rudy Huyn has been making 3rd party apps for WP and guess what, the dude now works for Microsoft making a 6 figure salary,

If you make apps for iOS or Android, start making apps for WP and join WPcentral(wink) and tell others that this is your app and, if they like it, it will push your app to the top of the marketplace in a few days.
/Just no in app purchases
 
2014-07-26 04:28:16 PM  

haterade69: This can only be good news for Windows Phone, and I'm guessing is why Google is doing everything possible to try to sabotage it.




That's got nothing to do with the problem.
The problem is that 90% of apps suck and were hastily written by programmers joining the goldrush.

/Lots of quantity, no quality.
/the walled garden model needs to be weeded or it's just as bad as any open platform.
 
2014-07-26 04:33:53 PM  
Good. Most app developers fail because most apps are crap. Yes, it's true that on occasion there is a really good app that gets buried in all the detritus and doesn't deserve it's tragic fate. Fortune isn't always fair but it tends to be fair on average and the average app deserve to be buried and forgotten.
 
2014-07-26 04:38:09 PM  
A big part of the reason that nobody pays for apps is that anything that isn't a game is probably not very useful.

I mean, after you get over the novelty of owning a smartphone and having "apps", you realize that you pretty much only do 5 things with a smartphone :

E-mail
GPS/maps
Text Messaging
Web browser
Phone

Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.
 
2014-07-26 04:41:22 PM  
Oops, add "music player" to my list.

It's kind of funny. I use my phone as a music player *all the time*, but I'm so used to it, that I didn't even think about it as being a function of my phone.
 
2014-07-26 04:41:49 PM  
Kind of like the Pet Rock fad...
 
2014-07-26 04:47:44 PM  
My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.
 
2014-07-26 04:48:28 PM  
So a new technology comes along, everyone and their brother jumps on board to get their piece of the pie and before you know it, the bottom drops out. Weird, that's never happened before.
 
2014-07-26 04:54:20 PM  

realmolo: Oops, add "music player" to my list.

It's kind of funny. I use my phone as a music player *all the time*, but I'm so used to it, that I didn't even think about it as being a function of my phone.


I use my smart phone for all that and more, just like you said.
I recently did a factory reset on my Droid4 and the only apps I reloaded were "productivity" weather apps and camera apps because I'm an instagram whore now.

the productivity apps are basically just universal unit and measurement converters and percentage calculators, storm eye and weather bug, then vignette, and retrocam,
none of the games went back on. I just havent the want or need to play them in months and they were taking up space

I actually don't use my phone as a phone very often on account it sucks for actually making calls. when it goes into the vehicle doc, it turns into a handy music player/gps/ and the phone audio is routed through the cars stereo so I can actually make actual phone calls..

Long story short..I agree with you.

but of course, if I had any ability to make an app that I could make money off of , I certainly wouldn't complain about ONLY making a couple hundred bucks off it a month till even that revenue vanished.
 
2014-07-26 05:12:26 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.


In your opinion what are users of Android and iOS missing out on because of this situation?
 
2014-07-26 05:29:12 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: realmolo: Oops, add "music player" to my list.

It's kind of funny. I use my phone as a music player *all the time*, but I'm so used to it, that I didn't even think about it as being a function of my phone.

I use my smart phone for all that and more, just like you said.
I recently did a factory reset on my Droid4 and the only apps I reloaded were "productivity" weather apps and camera apps because I'm an instagram whore now.

the productivity apps are basically just universal unit and measurement converters and percentage calculators, storm eye and weather bug, then vignette, and retrocam,
none of the games went back on. I just havent the want or need to play them in months and they were taking up space

I actually don't use my phone as a phone very often on account it sucks for actually making calls. when it goes into the vehicle doc, it turns into a handy music player/gps/ and the phone audio is routed through the cars stereo so I can actually make actual phone calls..

Long story short..I agree with you.

but of course, if I had any ability to make an app that I could make money off of , I certainly wouldn't complain about ONLY making a couple hundred bucks off it a month till even that revenue vanished.


It really depends on how much effort goes into making that 'couple hundred bucks'.

I had a small app, at it's peak I was making right around $100 per month....but it was such a pain in the ass I shut it down.  The webhost/domain name + the percentage taken + income tax meant that the $100 ended up being closer to $70 in my pocket.  At first, it was great, but as more people bought it, the number of emails I'd get asking questions went way up.  I was wasting an hour or two each weekend but, worst of all, I'd get people sending an email at 2am on a Tuesday about 'it not work!!!!!11!!' and by the time I checked my mail Wednesday after work around 6pm - I'd have six e-mails from the guy, each progressively more offensive because my program didn't work and they wanted their money back.

Then it got picked up by some piracy sites and sales dipped.

I probably made between $8-9 an hour if you added it all up, but it was infuriating.
 
2014-07-26 05:31:09 PM  
Content is king.

If you have an app with no substance it's not going to do well. If everyone else has the exact same stuff you're not going to do well either.
 
2014-07-26 05:32:52 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Cerebral Knievel: realmolo: Oops, add "music player" to my list.

It's kind of funny. I use my phone as a music player *all the time*, but I'm so used to it, that I didn't even think about it as being a function of my phone.

I use my smart phone for all that and more, just like you said.
I recently did a factory reset on my Droid4 and the only apps I reloaded were "productivity" weather apps and camera apps because I'm an instagram whore now.

the productivity apps are basically just universal unit and measurement converters and percentage calculators, storm eye and weather bug, then vignette, and retrocam,
none of the games went back on. I just havent the want or need to play them in months and they were taking up space

I actually don't use my phone as a phone very often on account it sucks for actually making calls. when it goes into the vehicle doc, it turns into a handy music player/gps/ and the phone audio is routed through the cars stereo so I can actually make actual phone calls..

Long story short..I agree with you.

but of course, if I had any ability to make an app that I could make money off of , I certainly wouldn't complain about ONLY making a couple hundred bucks off it a month till even that revenue vanished.

It really depends on how much effort goes into making that 'couple hundred bucks'.

I had a small app, at it's peak I was making right around $100 per month....but it was such a pain in the ass I shut it down.  The webhost/domain name + the percentage taken + income tax meant that the $100 ended up being closer to $70 in my pocket.  At first, it was great, but as more people bought it, the number of emails I'd get asking questions went way up.  I was wasting an hour or two each weekend but, worst of all, I'd get people sending an email at 2am on a Tuesday about 'it not work!!!!!11!!' and by the time I checked my mail Wednesday after work around 6pm - I'd have six e-mails from the guy, each progressively more offensive because my program didn't ...


What was your app?
 
2014-07-26 05:34:12 PM  
Pffff...
This works just about anywhere creative - "The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6% of developers [artists/musicians/sculptors/photographers/porn stars/...] make multiples of the other 98.4% combined."
 
2014-07-26 05:38:38 PM  

Mentat: rumpelstiltskin: Mentat: Revenue is a feature. Some companies can add it later, others need to work it out early.
- Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)


hahahahahaha  Yeah, ask the 90's how that worked.

Pay me! My code compiles! You can figure out the revenue model later. After you've paid me.

I've hired an IBM engineer to build things out of Legos.  I'm paying him $150K a year to do this.  Why?  Because venture capital, fark yeah!


That's the best way to identify geniuses. People who like Legos. I guess. I was left totally scratching my head at the end of JPod.
 
2014-07-26 05:48:43 PM  

Thelyphthoric: This works just about anywhere creative - "The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6% of developers [artists/musicians/sculptors/photographers/porn stars/...] make multiples of the other 98.4% combined."


Thread done in 23.
 
2014-07-26 05:56:42 PM  

jaytkay: Thelyphthoric: This works just about anywhere creative - "The revenue distribution is so heavily skewed towards the top that just 1.6% of developers [artists/musicians/sculptors/photographers/porn stars/...] make multiples of the other 98.4% combined."

Thread done in 23.


Thanks, I would have been here earlier, but someone in another thread was wrong.
 
2014-07-26 06:26:31 PM  
Open Source Developers around the World would like to have a word with you all....


I'm still waiting for the oversaturated, mindless, time wasting Advertising Industry to capitulate.  what a mess.  Wonder when those Dicks will start making commercials for their commercials??
 
2014-07-26 06:27:42 PM  

moeburn: haterade69: This can only be good news for Windows Phone, and I'm guessing is why Google is doing everything possible to try to sabotage it.

Why would Google need to try to sabotage Windows Phone?  Isn't that kinda like beating a dead horse?

That being said, it has become standard practise in the electronics business world for everybody to try and sabotage everybody else.


TheStupidItBurns.jpg

/You realize you just argued against yourself, right?
 
2014-07-26 06:29:55 PM  

realmolo: A big part of the reason that nobody pays for apps is that anything that isn't a game is probably not very useful.

I mean, after you get over the novelty of owning a smartphone and having "apps", you realize that you pretty much only do 5 things with a smartphone :

E-mail
GPS/maps
Text Messaging
Web browser
Phone

Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.


You must not like your phone very much, I have a lot of apps on there other than the six you mentioned (and those aren't even apps; they're all standard with the phone.)

However I never pay for any of the apps that I really use - other than my QR scanner they're all provided for free by the places I do business with (online banking, my phone carrier, GasBuddy, eBay/Amazon, news/weather/sports, Facebook, Lync and the Defender app for the two-factor authentication I need for remote access to the office.)  Plus Google Drive, Maps and Chrome - all on an iPhone :)

I have exactly one game that I really play, because I am a Bejeweled addict, but other than that nada. So I kind of see your point in that there aren't really paid apps that provide me any value, but there are a whole lot of apps out there that do.
 
2014-07-26 07:03:20 PM  

rumpelstiltskin: Mentat: rumpelstiltskin: Mentat: Revenue is a feature. Some companies can add it later, others need to work it out early.
- Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)


hahahahahaha  Yeah, ask the 90's how that worked.

Pay me! My code compiles! You can figure out the revenue model later. After you've paid me.

I've hired an IBM engineer to build things out of Legos.  I'm paying him $150K a year to do this.  Why?  Because venture capital, fark yeah!

That's the best way to identify geniuses. People who like Legos. I guess. I was left totally scratching my head at the end of JPod.


The plural of Lego is Lego. There is no such thing as 'Legos'.

/pet peeve
//not Danish
 
2014-07-26 07:06:43 PM  

MagSeven: Fark_Guy_Rob: Cerebral Knievel: realmolo: Oops, add "music player" to my list.

It's kind of funny. I use my phone as a music player *all the time*, but I'm so used to it, that I didn't even think about it as being a function of my phone.

I use my smart phone for all that and more, just like you said.
I recently did a factory reset on my Droid4 and the only apps I reloaded were "productivity" weather apps and camera apps because I'm an instagram whore now.

the productivity apps are basically just universal unit and measurement converters and percentage calculators, storm eye and weather bug, then vignette, and retrocam,
none of the games went back on. I just havent the want or need to play them in months and they were taking up space

I actually don't use my phone as a phone very often on account it sucks for actually making calls. when it goes into the vehicle doc, it turns into a handy music player/gps/ and the phone audio is routed through the cars stereo so I can actually make actual phone calls..

Long story short..I agree with you.

but of course, if I had any ability to make an app that I could make money off of , I certainly wouldn't complain about ONLY making a couple hundred bucks off it a month till even that revenue vanished.

It really depends on how much effort goes into making that 'couple hundred bucks'.

I had a small app, at it's peak I was making right around $100 per month....but it was such a pain in the ass I shut it down.  The webhost/domain name + the percentage taken + income tax meant that the $100 ended up being closer to $70 in my pocket.  At first, it was great, but as more people bought it, the number of emails I'd get asking questions went way up.  I was wasting an hour or two each weekend but, worst of all, I'd get people sending an email at 2am on a Tuesday about 'it not work!!!!!11!!' and by the time I checked my mail Wednesday after work around 6pm - I'd have six e-mails from the guy, each progressively more offensive because my ...


Disclaimer....I was just a college kid at the time.  I wasn't trying to ruin anyone's fun or be an evil person.

The program I wrote was a bot for the World of Warcraft.  This was back when WoW first came out.  It started out as something I wrote because I thought I could, and then some friends used it and then some guild members used it.  At first it was just a fishing bot, but it eventually could (poorly) farm instances.

I mostly like the idea of 'selling software'.  The idea of it gave me a warm and fuzzy feeling of accomplishment, but by the time I started selling it I'd finished school and was working full time.  So the effort in verse money out was way worse with my bot.  I was a consultant at the time and so paid overtime was a thing (as long as I was billing a client, I'd get my hourly wage).  After the thrill wore off, it was just too much effort for the money, IMHO.

It wasn't until long after that I realized how many people seem to really, really, really hate botters.  But when I wrote it, everyone i showed it to was all, 'That's awesome!' - I really just never thought of it was screwing up in-game economies or any of that jazz.  And, in my defence, my bot was pretty ineffective compared to others, so you couldn't really get too much out of it.
 
2014-07-26 07:42:32 PM  

haterade69: This can only be good news for Windows Phone, and I'm guessing is why Google is doing everything possible to try to sabotage it.


I just bought a new phone. I played around with a Windows phone for a few minutes. Google has nothing to worry about.

Ended up with an LG G3. Awesome phone.
 
2014-07-26 07:46:45 PM  
Just remember that as other jobs get automated away (and it's a matter of if, not when, most jobs, including a lot of professional tasks, will be handled by software) this is where the replacement jobs were going to be created.
 
2014-07-26 07:52:45 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.


I love that the slight barrier to entry keeps out less determined developers.  Warms my heart. Yes, the tools required to develop for these platforms are far too complex for ordinary developers.  I'm sure you have much better luck in the Windows store market. *cough*
 
2014-07-26 08:23:14 PM  

physt: Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.

I love that the slight barrier to entry keeps out less determined developers.  Warms my heart. Yes, the tools required to develop for these platforms are far too complex for ordinary developers.  I'm sure you have much better luck in the Windows store market. *cough*


You really have no concept of what it is like to port 750,000 lines of production software.
 
2014-07-26 08:25:55 PM  
/and that's just the human-maintained code. The automated build process is probably twice that. PS, it works under Windows, Linux, and OSX. Just the display engine for IOS and Andriod are so radically different from anything else out there it's cheaper to tell customers "fark it, just spend some money on hardware."
 
2014-07-26 08:26:49 PM  
/and by customers I mean the US Navy, the Australian Navy and the South Korean Navy...
 
2014-07-26 09:06:56 PM  

realmolo: A big part of the reason that nobody pays for apps is that anything that isn't a game is probably not very useful.

I mean, after you get over the novelty of owning a smartphone and having "apps", you realize that you pretty much only do 5 things with a smartphone :

E-mail
GPS/maps
Text Messaging
Web browser
Phone

Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.


I remember when I made the jump from Blackberry to Android, oh the joy- apps!

Ha! It's like you said, it turns out that I only used the main apps most of the time.  You only need one messaging app after all.  When it's all said and done I'd be willing to bet I've spent more time rooting my phones and installing custom roms than I have spent on third party apps, not counting games.  The concept of finding useful apps and actually using them is great, the reality is just how often am I really going to use Airdroid anyways?  It's like being the guy in the neighborhood who has a garage full of tools, but only uses them to change the oil in his car every so often.
 
2014-07-26 09:14:53 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: physt: Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.

I love that the slight barrier to entry keeps out less determined developers.  Warms my heart. Yes, the tools required to develop for these platforms are far too complex for ordinary developers.  I'm sure you have much better luck in the Windows store market. *cough*

You really have no concept of what it is like to port 750,000 lines of production software.


Oh yes, yes I do.  I worked on a 5 year project to port a WebObjects application for a financial services company to Java.  Are you saying you can't write a successful iPhone or Android app because you can't port your 750,000 lines of production C code to a phone? Really?
 
2014-07-26 09:27:05 PM  

realmolo: A big part of the reason that nobody pays for apps is that anything that isn't a game is probably not very useful.

I mean, after you get over the novelty of owning a smartphone and having "apps", you realize that you pretty much only do 5 things with a smartphone :

E-mail
GPS/maps
Text Messaging
Web browser
Phone

Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.


I use a fair number of other apps - a local news app, plus a couple weather apps. And then there's the app that I used the most of all... Ingress. I'm a junkie and I can't quit it. Same as my husband. Most of the players I've met are significantly older than I am. I've got a few other games, too, for when I can't move around or don't have a data connection, but they don't get used as much as Ingress (anything from 30 minutes to 8 hours a day. Every day).

Now, I don't know that I'd have been willing to have paid for it to start - I have yet to pay for a single app - but if they started charging for it now, I'd shell out for it without a second thought. Probably cost less than the batteries we've bought to play, as well as the gas... By a lot.
 
2014-07-26 10:19:33 PM  

realmolo: Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.


There are quite a few very good games on mobile phones, but sadly they are often quite hard to find among the flappy candy farts and the "buy a packet of virtual gems for real money to continue" in app purchase muggers. Over the years I have managed to find loads of them. Personally, I love having a decent games library with me at all times.
 
2014-07-26 11:31:42 PM  
People pay for apps?

How strange.
 
2014-07-27 01:06:01 AM  
Maybe because most of the apps are data minig clones like "Mad Birds" and "Super Martin Bros" or awful pay to win freemium games everyone just pirates..

It's not that there are too many apps, it's just that most near all the apps suck
 
2014-07-27 02:26:08 AM  

Birnone: realmolo: A big part of the reason that nobody pays for apps is that anything that isn't a game is probably not very useful.

I mean, after you get over the novelty of owning a smartphone and having "apps", you realize that you pretty much only do 5 things with a smartphone :

E-mail
GPS/maps
Text Messaging
Web browser
Phone

Oh, and MAYBE you use it as en e-book reader, too. Games? Eh. I suppose people under 25 might play them, sometimes. But most phone-based games are not very interesting for very long.

Most apps are just novelties, and hardly worth paying for.

I remember when I made the jump from Blackberry to Android, oh the joy- apps!

Ha! It's like you said, it turns out that I only used the main apps most of the time.  You only need one messaging app after all.  When it's all said and done I'd be willing to bet I've spent more time rooting my phones and installing custom roms than I have spent on third party apps, not counting games.  The concept of finding useful apps and actually using them is great, the reality is just how often am I really going to use Airdroid anyways?  It's like being the guy in the neighborhood who has a garage full of tools, but only uses them to change the oil in his car every so often.


I was really happy moving from Blackberry to my iPhone for the first month, but that was it. Now I'm seriously considering going back just for the physical keyboard. It turns out I'm not one of those people who uses his phone for apps, so what's the point?
 
2014-07-27 05:09:28 AM  

physt: Evil Twin Skippy: physt: Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.

I love that the slight barrier to entry keeps out less determined developers.  Warms my heart. Yes, the tools required to develop for these platforms are far too complex for ordinary developers.  I'm sure you have much better luck in the Windows store market. *cough*

You really have no concept of what it is like to port 750,000 lines of production software.

Oh yes, yes I do.  I worked on a 5 year project to port a WebObjects application for a financial services company to Java.  Are you saying you can't write a successful iPhone or Android app because you can't port your 750,000 lines of production C code to a phone? Really?


Oh we have a badass here. He/She once worked on a large IT project. Clear the way.

You don't see the obvious folly of devoting years of toil and treasure to a platform that may or may not exist at the end of the project? You see, out here in the real world, we get paid for what the software actually produces. It's not an end unto itself.

And in our case we do expert system modeling of naval battle damage. Our simulations run for days on blade hardware, and analyzed for months afterwards by engineers on workstations with as many screens as we can economically cram onto one desk. The one thing that would be "nice" to have is a way to take the model with us in the field. (And by field I mean into the cramped confines of a ship.)

And we could have thrown everything into building an IOS/Android app. Or just waited a year or 3 until Windows tablets that were cheaper, faster, ran a conventional operating system, and included a keyboard came around.

And then our biggest problem would be resizing a few buttons.

You pick.
 
2014-07-27 05:13:09 AM  
I could be turning out apps at one a week instead of the work I do but I just dont see the point I truly dont. I work on two kinds of things.. things that someone will PAY for and things that amuse me tremendously. Apps on the whole fit neither criteria.
 
2014-07-27 05:19:29 AM  
I've paid for two apps over five years of smartphone ownership. One is a guitar tuner with an awesome UI, it's so good I felt the need to contribute (I could have kept using the free version), and the other is lightflow. I really love my colored led. Total spent over the years: less than $1 per year.
 
2014-07-27 07:46:07 AM  

Evil Twin Skippy: physt: Evil Twin Skippy: physt: Evil Twin Skippy: My biggest frustration with both the Apple and Android markets is that the walled garden doesn't let me bring in any of the tools that I use as a professional programmer. Program in C? Well that's nice... but to get anything out of the API we really need you to write in a completely new language. The fact that both Android and iOS are unix offshoots amounts to nothing. You can't access normal unix tools. Hell, even the network stacks are wonky.

So the only programs you get on those platforms are neophyte wonders and gaming studios (who are used to working on boutique platforms.) I got so fed up trying to write for iOS, I finally bought a Windows tablet to develop mobile apps on.

I love that the slight barrier to entry keeps out less determined developers.  Warms my heart. Yes, the tools required to develop for these platforms are far too complex for ordinary developers.  I'm sure you have much better luck in the Windows store market. *cough*

You really have no concept of what it is like to port 750,000 lines of production software.

Oh yes, yes I do.  I worked on a 5 year project to port a WebObjects application for a financial services company to Java.  Are you saying you can't write a successful iPhone or Android app because you can't port your 750,000 lines of production C code to a phone? Really?

Oh we have a badass here. He/She once worked on a large IT project. Clear the way.

You don't see the obvious folly of devoting years of toil and treasure to a platform that may or may not exist at the end of the project? You see, out here in the real world, we get paid for what the software actually produces. It's not an end unto itself.

And in our case we do expert system modeling of naval battle damage. Our simulations run for days on blade hardware, and analyzed for months afterwards by engineers on workstations with as many screens as we can economically cram onto one desk. The one thing that would be "nice" to ...


So you're the only guy that ever worked on anything complex? Got it.

At this point, I've lost track of what you're biatching about. You're upset that a phone can't run your navel sim that requires blade hardware?  Sounds like you don't need to be in the app store anyway.
 
2014-07-27 11:09:34 AM  
I would think something named 'Peek App' would be a big hit...
 
2014-07-27 12:42:43 PM  

narkor: Just remember that as other jobs get automated away (and it's a matter of if, not when, most jobs, including a lot of professional tasks, will be handled by software) this is where the replacement jobs were going to be created.


Favorited.  You see the big picture.
 
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