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(Apartment Therapy)   A) When you make your baby wear an anklet   (apartmenttherapy.com) divider line 13
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1709 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Jul 2014 at 7:56 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-24 05:24:12 PM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-24 05:25:04 PM  
screw that.  if I had kids, I'd chip them like a farking dog until they were 18.
 
2014-07-24 06:28:31 PM  
CSB time:
My daughter was born at 29 weeks. And came home at 37 weeks after recovering from a bout of sepsis. After watching her blood O2 levels drop before our eyes in the NICU we were understandably paranoid when we got her home. We looked everywhere for a preemie sized, or even infant sized oximeter, but couldn't find one that didn't require a $6000 hospital grade machine to attach too. I looked at the Smart Sock, but it was just starting development. For the first 6 months our solution was to wake up and check the bassinet multiple times a night, and use a video monitor during the day, and try and guess from her coloration how everything was going. Those first few moments when it was my turn to check were terrifying. Culminating in the scariest night when she had a severe asthma attack and had to go to the hospital even after an albuterol treatment. That sock would have been a godsend.

tl;dr
One of those monitors would have given me a lot of "peace of mind" with my preemie. Fark you subby.
 
2014-07-24 06:43:09 PM  
My baby wears a monitor.

It tells me when she has stopped making shoes so I can get out of my recliner to up the voltage on her remote nipple clamps.

I DON'T HEAR ANY COBBLING GOING ON, DON'T MAKE ME COME DOWN THERE!
 
2014-07-24 08:12:03 PM  
Get 'em used to constant monitoring from an early age. It's the only way they'll fit into the workforce in 2040.
 
2014-07-24 08:27:27 PM  
What if he's still on Parole
 
2014-07-24 08:34:36 PM  

SumJackass07: Fark you subby


I didn't even read the article, lol.

That site (Apartment Therapy) is/was supposed to be a design blog, not sure why they ended up mucking about with a baby monitor (do you see babies in the menu? I don't see babies in the menu, weeeeeeirddddd).

Anyway, I opened the article, saw the baby with an anklet and thought (that looks like a GPS monitor for felons, let me think of a funny Fark headline for it).

// subby
 
2014-07-24 09:54:42 PM  
If it's wrong to want to get instant notification of the baby's O2 sat or hear rate suddenly drops, rather than just walking in to a SIDS victim, then I don't want to be right.
 
2014-07-24 10:18:30 PM  

SumJackass07: CSB time:
My daughter was born at 29 weeks. And came home at 37 weeks after recovering from a bout of sepsis. After watching her blood O2 levels drop before our eyes in the NICU we were understandably paranoid when we got her home. We looked everywhere for a preemie sized, or even infant sized oximeter, but couldn't find one that didn't require a $6000 hospital grade machine to attach too. I looked at the Smart Sock, but it was just starting development. For the first 6 months our solution was to wake up and check the bassinet multiple times a night, and use a video monitor during the day, and try and guess from her coloration how everything was going. Those first few moments when it was my turn to check were terrifying. Culminating in the scariest night when she had a severe asthma attack and had to go to the hospital even after an albuterol treatment. That sock would have been a godsend.

tl;dr
One of those monitors would have given me a lot of "peace of mind" with my preemie. Fark you subby.


To be fair, TFA does mention that this is understandable for premies and children with medical conditions. It's asking how far is too far for healthy babies, and are parents of healthy children freaking out too much.

I never monitored my kids, but they were both healthy and to term. They slept in their crib which we put in our room, and while I might check to see if they were still breathing, I never worried much except when they were sick. Otherwise I would have worried myself sick over something that I really had no control over.
 
2014-07-25 12:07:53 AM  
38.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-07-25 12:13:44 AM  
MIT motion and color magnification (see the bottom video at 0:27 and 1:18).  Passive monitoring technology (wouldn't work in the dark without night vision, though).
 
2014-07-25 09:20:01 AM  
When my kids were babies, we put them to bed so we didn't have to be bothered by them anymore.
They grew up fine.
I don't understand the constant need to monitor your kids. You put them to bed and they are fine 99.9999999999% of the time, the rest of the time you are just going to hear them cry, well babies cry in bed, you don't have to hear it in every room you are in.
They have to learn to cry themselves to sleep, it will eventually stop once they learn that it does no good.
If they are in distress, you will hear it and you should know the difference between the "come and get me" cry and the "distress" cry.
People quit babying your babies.
 
2014-07-25 01:05:51 PM  

lordargent: SumJackass07: Fark you subby

::Good explanation for the headline that didn't weigh in on the authors premise::

// subby


Well, crap. Sorry.
 
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