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(CBS News)   Scientists link schizophrenia to 100 different genes. And as all schizophrenics know, every one of those genes is out to get them   (cbsnews.com) divider line 4
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2014-07-24 05:18:04 AM
I wonder how many of those you have to have to have schizophrenia.    Each gene contains coding for the formation of at least one protein (many genes have multi-layered encoding meaning they are "edited" in different ways during RNA formation to make different proteins).  Those proteins can be neurotransmitters, hormones, enzymes, cell receptors, cell membrane ports, blah blah blah.

DNA is one of those things that make me understand why people want so hard to believe in intelligent design.  It's like viewing the source code for some really awesome application and thinking "someone HAD to write that".  And every known lifeform on the planet has the same programming language in their DNA.  It's really quite amazing.

And it's farking late and I"m tired and I still have 4 hours of work! UGH!
 
2014-07-24 06:31:13 AM

Ambivalence: I wonder how many of those you have to have to have schizophrenia.    Each gene contains coding for the formation of at least one protein (many genes have multi-layered encoding meaning they are "edited" in different ways during RNA formation to make different proteins).  Those proteins can be neurotransmitters, hormones, enzymes, cell receptors, cell membrane ports, blah blah blah.

DNA is one of those things that make me understand why people want so hard to believe in intelligent design.  It's like viewing the source code for some really awesome application and thinking "someone HAD to write that".  And every known lifeform on the planet has the same programming language in their DNA.  It's really quite amazing.

And it's farking late and I"m tired and I still have 4 hours of work! UGH!


Plus the brain and neurological processes are so fantastically complex that it's not really surprising that there are hundreds of ways it can get disrupted by small differences in those proteins.

In fact, it's kind of surprising that most people's brains work as well as they do. It's like doing a juggling act standing on a table made of toothpicks, yet we still usually manage to keep the balls in the air.

I suck at analogies, but you get my drift.
 
2014-07-24 06:37:54 AM

MrBallou: Plus the brain and neurological processes are so fantastically complex that it's not really surprising that there are hundreds of ways it can get disrupted by small differences in those proteins.

In fact, it's kind of surprising that most people's brains work as well as they do. It's like doing a juggling act standing on a table made of toothpicks, yet we still usually manage to keep the balls in the air.

I suck at analogies, but you get my drift.


When you look at the complexity of Prokaryotic lifeforms on the cellular level, it's amazing that anything works as well as it does.  Our entire bodies and everything we will ever have or ever be came from a single cell.  How the fark is that even possible? It's like trying to grasp the scope of the universe itself.  It's not humanly possible.

But we keep trying.
 
2014-07-24 06:50:17 AM

Ambivalence: MrBallou: Plus the brain and neurological processes are so fantastically complex that it's not really surprising that there are hundreds of ways it can get disrupted by small differences in those proteins.

In fact, it's kind of surprising that most people's brains work as well as they do. It's like doing a juggling act standing on a table made of toothpicks, yet we still usually manage to keep the balls in the air.

I suck at analogies, but you get my drift.

When you look at the complexity of Prokaryotic lifeforms on the cellular level, it's amazing that anything works as well as it does.  Our entire bodies and everything we will ever have or ever be came from a single cell.  How the fark is that even possible? It's like trying to grasp the scope of the universe itself.  It's not humanly possible.

But we keep trying.


That's why I love biology.

Rocket science is easy: take into account a few dozen factors, do some math, and you're done.

Biology is hard: chemistry, molecular interactions, cells, organisms, populations, communities, ecosystems. All complex and all constantly changing.
 
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