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(CBS Miami)   Man returns home from a two-day vacation to find a family living there because they fell for a real-estate scam   (miami.cbslocal.com) divider line 205
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14685 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jul 2014 at 1:40 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-24 01:20:53 AM  
Both of them should stand their ground. Per Florida law, whoever shoots first gets the house and the pregnant woman.
 
2014-07-24 01:39:29 AM  

nickdaisy: Both of them should stand their ground. Per Florida law, whoever shoots first gets the house and the pregnant woman.


This is the first sane thing I've read all day!
 
2014-07-24 01:46:37 AM  
I can't believe how often this seems to happen.  If I came home and someone was living at my house i'd be taking a run at them until the cops put me away for good.  They'll end up leaving because i'll end up be crazier than they could be. Screw taking 6 months in the courts to get them "legally" evicted - they weren't there when I left, they won't be there when I get back.  That's it.
 
2014-07-24 01:47:00 AM  
The man who moved in with his pregnant wife and toddler didn't want to be identified but said he was scammed by a phony realtor.

I got scammed, so now it's YOUR problem, buddy!
 
2014-07-24 01:47:54 AM  

nickdaisy: Both of them should stand their ground. Per Florida law, whoever shoots first gets the house and the pregnant woman.


pbs.twimg.com
 
2014-07-24 01:52:59 AM  
Just put razor wire about neck high near all the exits, and set it ablaze. Is it insured? Insure it first, obviously. Another option is wait out the pregnancy. Eventually they will leave the house when she goes into labor, that's when you grab them and deliver the baby yourself, then kill it in front of them, and say that's for stealing my parking spot, or w/e. What's this about again?
 
2014-07-24 01:53:22 AM  
Something is amiss...
 
2014-07-24 01:55:20 AM  

you are a puppet: Just put razor wire about neck high near all the exits, and set it ablaze. Is it insured? Insure it first, obviously. Another option is wait out the pregnancy. Eventually they will leave the house when she goes into labor, that's when you grab them and deliver the baby yourself, then kill it in front of them, and say that's for stealing my parking spot, or w/e. What's this about again?


cut the power, I imagine it's pretty warm there about now...
 
2014-07-24 02:02:23 AM  

sharphead: I can't believe how often this seems to happen.  If I came home and someone was living at my house i'd be taking a run at them until the cops put me away for good.  They'll end up leaving because i'll end up be crazier than they could be. Screw taking 6 months in the courts to get them "legally" evicted - they weren't there when I left, they won't be there when I get back.  That's it.


It seems rather easy to make a bunch of documents about ownership of the house. Simple back story about how the previous renter just up and left leaving his things to cover his first and last month's rent that was not collected under "good faith" by the owner, push the people looking to move in to cut a check quick since someone else is going to take it for less tomorrow, and cash it at the bank with them there "just to make sure they have enough money in their account". Hand them a set of keys for the locks you installed the day prior, and skip town thousands of dollars in cash richer. The only thing you need to do is alter your appearance enough that when they eventually look at the bank cameras identifying you, you look like someone else or are otherwise unrecognizable.
 
2014-07-24 02:08:23 AM  
Remember to shoot first and often then hide the bodies.  Nobody but the carpet cleaning crew will be the wiser.
 
2014-07-24 02:10:18 AM  
so is the prego chick hot?

let her stay
 
2014-07-24 02:45:15 AM  

Etchy333: The man who moved in with his pregnant wife and toddler didn't want to be identified but said he was scammed by a phony realtor.

I got scammed, so now it's YOUR problem, buddy!


To quote FTFA: "I'm really stunned because the house was set to be sold already. I can't sell the house until we get them out of there," said Camayd.

What's the problem? Sell the house as-is with the current occupants as Staff and/or "furniture."

Lincoln abolished slavery, not serfdom: they're not chattels, they belong to the property.

To quote Wikipedia: "A lord of the manor could not sell his serfs as a Roman might sell his slaves. On the other hand, if he chose to dispose of a parcel of land, the serfs associated with that land stayed with it to serve their new lord, benefitting him with their long-acquired knowledge of practices suited to the land. Further, a serf could not abandon his lands without permission, nor did he possess a saleable title in them."

But anyway.

Seriously, if they've got no money left and nowhere to go what would you do with them? The tenant was set to move out already and the wife is pregnant. I'd propose the tenant takes his stuff, minus whatever he lends or donates to the new dwellers, while (assuming they've got income) let them save up to find a new place. Or the owner could just keep the place and rent it to them.

Some provision should be made, at any rate: you don't send a swollen waddling mother-to-be out to be homeless. Of course this idea is distinctly un-American, but then I'm weird.
 
2014-07-24 03:02:48 AM  
No sympathy for the "scammed" purchasers.  Get out.  No way you thought it was legit buying a fully furnished home with clothing and dishes, etc.  I dont see why they shouldnt be treated as intruders and forcefully removed by law and/or tenant.
 
2014-07-24 03:07:59 AM  

Frederick: No sympathy for the "scammed" purchasers.  Get out.  No way you thought it was legit buying a fully furnished home with clothing and dishes, etc.


IIRC they thought they'd rented it; lots of places are rented fully furnished.


I dont see why they shouldnt be treated as intruders and forcefully removed by law and/or tenant.

You don't? Really?
 
2014-07-24 03:09:11 AM  

The One True TheDavid: at any rate: you don't send a swollen waddling mother-to-be out to be homeless.


I try to side with compassion on these issues, but you can't tell me if some random pregnant woman and her husband moved into your house one day you wouldn't have them removed. I'm not saying shoot them (as some freaks here are prone to) but they need to get out of a house they have no right to. It sucks, but thems the breaks.
 
2014-07-24 03:20:06 AM  
Sucks to be you, GTFO.
 
2014-07-24 03:21:55 AM  

Omahawg: so is the prego chick hot?

let her stay


Fat, hormonal, and crazy?  There's no way I'd want that in my house.
 
2014-07-24 03:30:21 AM  

The One True TheDavid: Frederick:

I dont see why they shouldnt be treated as intruders and forcefully removed by law and/or tenant.

You don't? Really?


No I don't, really. Squatting is illegal, and they have no legitimate claim to the house. Have the Sheriff boot them out and let the actual Renter back inside.
 
2014-07-24 03:38:19 AM  

sharphead: I can't believe how often this seems to happen.  If I came home and someone was living at my house i'd be taking a run at them until the cops put me away for good.  They'll end up leaving because i'll end up be crazier than they could be. Screw taking 6 months in the courts to get them "legally" evicted - they weren't there when I left, they won't be there when I get back.  That's it.


This. Forget living in a motel for 6 months while the courts work things out, get out of my house or I'll hurt your family.
 
2014-07-24 03:47:19 AM  
"He said a lease agreement proves he paid $3,600 to live at the home."

You don't have an agreement with the owner or tenant of the farking property. You didn't pay the $3600 to the owner or tenant of the farking property. You either got scammed or you tried to generate cover for your squat. Either way your lease agreement isn't worth jackshiat. GTFO.

It's marginally plausible that the squatters are there in good faith; the tenant was in the process of moving out so maybe the place looked it, or maybe the guy who changed the locks cleared the place out. But if the squatters had to empty a drawer of clothing or personal files or take down a photo of the tenant or the like, then their naiveté becomes less plausible and someone ought to look closely at their possible participation.
 
2014-07-24 03:49:48 AM  
No problem. I'd just let myself in and squat along with them. See how they feel about living with a big hairy SOB with a habit of walking around the house nude and scratching himself, and making the air near the bathroom unbreathable twice a day on average. "Sorry, damn chili/pulled pork/spareribs." Teaching the young'un about all sorts of fart jokes and how to make neat belching noises. Regularly jack off to computer porn with pregnant chicks and make sure you get lots of spam from the associated sites.
 
2014-07-24 04:12:09 AM  
Sounds like the premise to a terrible sitcom. Isn't Two and a Half Men over now? Maybe they can replace it with another awful show based on this.
 
2014-07-24 04:33:53 AM  
I'd be willing to bet money that the "realtor scam" is entirely fictional and that the family are just squatters.
 
2014-07-24 04:36:48 AM  

JesusJuice: sharphead: I can't believe how often this seems to happen.  If I came home and someone was living at my house i'd be taking a run at them until the cops put me away for good.  They'll end up leaving because i'll end up be crazier than they could be. Screw taking 6 months in the courts to get them "legally" evicted - they weren't there when I left, they won't be there when I get back.  That's it.

This. Forget living in a motel for 6 months while the courts work things out, get out of my house or I'll hurt your family.


Sure, sure. Why spend 6 months in a motel when that time could be spent in jail? And besides, criminal courts are much more fun than civil courts anyway.
 
2014-07-24 04:46:16 AM  

cynicalbastard: No problem. I'd just let myself in and squat along with them. See how they feel about living with a big hairy SOB with a habit of walking around the house nude and scratching himself, and making the air near the bathroom unbreathable twice a day on average. "Sorry, damn chili/pulled pork/spareribs." Teaching the young'un about all sorts of fart jokes and how to make neat belching noises. Regularly jack off to computer porn with pregnant chicks and make sure you get lots of spam from the associated sites.


This.  I've always wondered what would happen if you break back into your own house and refuse to leave (assuming there aren't any weapons involved).  If I started clearing their shiat out of my bedroom and threw it out the window onto the lawn, what would the police do?  I'm in.  The stuff in the house is mine.  Anybody know?
 
2014-07-24 04:48:04 AM  
I sure wish the article would load for me, it sounds interesting.
 
2014-07-24 05:17:42 AM  
Who changes the locks immediately when moving into a new place? Are you even allowed to change the locks when you are renting?
 
2014-07-24 05:20:13 AM  

The One True TheDavid: You don't? Really?


The owner can't sell that house as planned with them living there.  The actual tenant - the one that has been paying rent - now has no place to live, plus all of his belongings are in the house and these people are using his stuff.  They won't move out on their own.  They are trespassing, they refuse to leave, so they should be arrested.

You're siding with the bums who moved in without paying rent.

Yes, they say they paid "some guy", but they could easily have made that story up.  And regardless of whether they are scammers themselves, or victims who got scammed, they have no right to the house.
 
2014-07-24 06:09:21 AM  
I'm glad this story didn't end up with them shooting the real renter returning home.
 
2014-07-24 06:09:40 AM  
If it looks like a civil dispute the police will stay out of the situation. The lease with a payment of 3,600 (whether real or not) gives that appearance.

The renter or the property owner can go through the legal process of eviction. It's not emotional, just hire an attorney.
 
2014-07-24 06:18:01 AM  
Solution seems simple enough. Wait till they're out of the house, then change the locks again. Since you're now occupying the property, they can't have the police throw you out.
 
2014-07-24 06:19:39 AM  

Delay: It's not emotional, just hire an attorney.


If it's strictly business, why not go straight to Don Corleone?
 
2014-07-24 06:35:15 AM  
32 comments in and there is no screenshots of when Jim Varney voiced a Carnie on the Simpsons?

For shame...
 
2014-07-24 06:40:30 AM  

jeffdo1: Who changes the locks immediately when moving into a new place? Are you even allowed to change the locks when you are renting?


Actually, I do. I either make the landlord change the locks, or I get permission to do it myself. Neither you nor the landlord have any idea or control over how many keys the previous renter(s) made and passed around to whomever. I don't plan to get surprised in the middle of the night by some drunken college students who think Jimbo still lives here.
 
2014-07-24 06:44:08 AM  

JuggleGeek: The One True TheDavid: You don't? Really?

The owner can't sell that house as planned with them living there.  The actual tenant - the one that has been paying rent - now has no place to live, plus all of his belongings are in the house and these people are using his stuff.  They won't move out on their own.  They are trespassing, they refuse to leave, so they should be arrested.

You're siding with the bums who moved in without paying rent.

Yes, they say they paid "some guy", but they could easily have made that story up.  And regardless of whether they are scammers themselves, or victims who got scammed, they have no right to the house.


They do have a right to live there until the court sorts the whole thing out.
 
2014-07-24 06:44:18 AM  

cfletch13: 32 comments in and there is no screenshots of when Jim Varney voiced a Carnie on the Simpsons?

For shame...


NOW you're on the trolley
 
2014-07-24 06:44:42 AM  
Sounds like no due diligance
 
2014-07-24 06:44:53 AM  

cynicalbastard: No problem. I'd just let myself in and squat along with them. See how they feel about living with a big hairy SOB with a habit of walking around the house nude and scratching himself, and making the air near the bathroom unbreathable twice a day on average. "Sorry, damn chili/pulled pork/spareribs." Teaching the young'un about all sorts of fart jokes and how to make neat belching noises. Regularly jack off to computer porn with pregnant chicks and make sure you get lots of spam from the associated sites.


Now that's a good idea.
Don't forget to regularly use all the hot water, leave empty  toilet paper roll on the spool, and host an occasional rave.
 
2014-07-24 06:50:44 AM  

The One True TheDavid: Etchy333: The man who moved in with his pregnant wife and toddler didn't want to be identified but said he was scammed by a phony realtor.

I got scammed, so now it's YOUR problem, buddy!

To quote FTFA: "I'm really stunned because the house was set to be sold already. I can't sell the house until we get them out of there," said Camayd.

What's the problem? Sell the house as-is with the current occupants as Staff and/or "furniture."

Lincoln abolished slavery, not serfdom: they're not chattels, they belong to the property.

To quote Wikipedia: "A lord of the manor could not sell his serfs as a Roman might sell his slaves. On the other hand, if he chose to dispose of a parcel of land, the serfs associated with that land stayed with it to serve their new lord, benefitting him with their long-acquired knowledge of practices suited to the land. Further, a serf could not abandon his lands without permission, nor did he possess a saleable title in them."

But anyway.

Seriously, if they've got no money left and nowhere to go what would you do with them? The tenant was set to move out already and the wife is pregnant. I'd propose the tenant takes his stuff, minus whatever he lends or donates to the new dwellers, while (assuming they've got income) let them save up to find a new place. Or the owner could just keep the place and rent it to them.

Some provision should be made, at any rate: you don't send a swollen waddling mother-to-be out to be homeless. Of course this idea is distinctly un-American, but then I'm weird.


So they can move in with you, then. Problem solved!
 
2014-07-24 06:53:54 AM  
I was looking for a house and saw really low rental rate on a house in a neighborhood I wanted on craigslist. I figured there was something wrong with it I wasn't seeing, so I emailed the guy, and what came back indicated it a scam. It even had something about working for an African government in there, as if the rest of it wasn't glaringly obvious.
 
2014-07-24 06:55:07 AM  

evil saltine: Solution seems simple enough. Wait till they're out of the house, then change the locks again. Since you're now occupying the property, they can't have the police throw you out.


Probably not a good idea. Now you are playing the squatter's game and they are better at it than you. Also, most states have laws that forbid owners do it yourself schemes.

Landlords routinely deal with tenants that overstay. Just go through eviction process and explain ALL expenses are paid by the persons being evicted. The courts have powerful ways to get paid.
 
2014-07-24 07:00:26 AM  
ongbok:
They do have a right to live there until the court sorts the whole thing out.

Why?

Have they produced the cashed check or money order, showing who they paid the money to?

Have they even shown any sort of proof they paid any money at all?

How about any sort of link to the person they supposedly paid the money to? A Craigslist ad? A phone number? Anything?

Here's the interesting part: the guy was only out of town for only two days. Which means the scammer managed to figure out that he was gone and put together the whole mess in less than 48 hours - finding two victims with lots of ready cash, changing the locks, et cetera. If the scam actually happened as they say, it was almost certainly someone who knew the guy who really has the lease. I'd start looking into recently-vanished neighbors, or neighbors who are related to the fake tenants.
 
2014-07-24 07:19:44 AM  
"Officer, I came home and surprised a burglar in my home. He made a threatening move, and I was in fear for my life. I want to be cooperative, but I think it best if I retained counsel before making any further statements."
 
2014-07-24 07:20:04 AM  

ongbok: JuggleGeek: The One True TheDavid: You don't? Really?

The owner can't sell that house as planned with them living there.  The actual tenant - the one that has been paying rent - now has no place to live, plus all of his belongings are in the house and these people are using his stuff.  They won't move out on their own.  They are trespassing, they refuse to leave, so they should be arrested.

You're siding with the bums who moved in without paying rent.

Yes, they say they paid "some guy", but they could easily have made that story up.  And regardless of whether they are scammers themselves, or victims who got scammed, they have no right to the house.

They do have a right to live there until the court sorts the whole thing

Delay: evil saltine: Solution seems simple enough. Wait till they're out of the house, then change the locks again. Since you're now occupying the property, they can't have the police throw you out.

Probably not a good idea. Now you are playing the squatter's game and they are better at it than you. Also, most states have laws that forbid owners do it yourself schemes.

Landlords routinely deal with tenants that overstay. Just go through eviction process and explain ALL expenses are paid by the persons being evicted. The courts have powerful ways to get paid.


And how long does that process take? All of the legit tenants belongings are in the house and he can't get in. He's just supposed to roll over and be abused by some random people that make his home theirs?
 
2014-07-24 07:22:04 AM  

ongbok: JuggleGeek: The One True TheDavid: You don't? Really?

The owner can't sell that house as planned with them living there.  The actual tenant - the one that has been paying rent - now has no place to live, plus all of his belongings are in the house and these people are using his stuff.  They won't move out on their own.  They are trespassing, they refuse to leave, so they should be arrested.

You're siding with the bums who moved in without paying rent.

Yes, they say they paid "some guy", but they could easily have made that story up.  And regardless of whether they are scammers themselves, or victims who got scammed, they have no right to the house.

They do have a right to live there until the court sorts the whole thing out.


So does the original renter. They are all tenants will all the legal protections provided. This will give him the opportunity to remove his belongings too. The squatters want to block him getting in? The rightful landlord can just have a locksmith come around and change the locks again. It falls under maintenance since the landlord is lacking a key. They will get a warning before hand (during which I would watch the house like a hawk since they might try and steal things), but they can't stop it. All this will get at least the original tenant's property back in case they are the scammers.

Anyway you cut this cake, the family has the right to stay in the home until a court kicks them out. Those responsible for this can and will most likely be held responsible in court at both civil and criminal levels.

Now, if they issued a check to the scammer and the scammer cashed it anywhere there is a record of legal ID for that person. Whether that ID is real is immaterial since it must be photo ID. If the ID is fake, then the institution that cashed the check is liable for that money and any damages from fraud committed because of it. Good faith only goes so far.

If these dumb f@rks gave cash or a money order that they have no record of, they will be out and sued so fast it will make their heads spin.

Anyway you look at this, everyone loses and may not get what they deserve. I only hope that the tenant and landlord have insurance since it normally deals with this sort of crap and they have the lawyers, money and experience to deal with it.


\in my state I could legally kill them just by finding them there as long as I gave a verbal warning
\\and a chance to GTFO with their personal property
\\not that I would kill them, but I could make the threat and give them the time to GTFO
\\\and yes that is as a tenant
\and for the slashies
 
2014-07-24 07:22:18 AM  

Etchy333: The man who moved in with his pregnant wife and toddler didn't want to be identified but said he was scammed by a phony realtor.

I got scammed, so now it's YOUR problem, buddy!


www.pensitoreview.com

Isn't the American free market just wonderful?
 
2014-07-24 07:23:14 AM  

The One True TheDavid: Frederick: No sympathy for the "scammed" purchasers.  Get out.  No way you thought it was legit buying a fully furnished home with clothing and dishes, etc.

IIRC they thought they'd rented it; lots of places are rented fully furnished.



Not with clothes and a fridge full of food they aren't
 
2014-07-24 07:25:29 AM  

adm_crunch: "Officer, I came home and surprised a burglar in my home. He made a threatening move, and I was in fear for my life. I want to be cooperative, but I think it best if I retained counsel before making any further statements."


You forgot to add in: my key seemed to not work, so I kicked the door in since the lock was broken.
 
2014-07-24 07:28:27 AM  

cirby: I'd start looking into recently-vanished neighbors, or neighbors who are related to the fake tenants.


You could do that, but you would be wasting your time. As ongbok indicated landlord tenant disputes are really common. States have laws that make it clear it's up to the courts to sort things out. Until it's settled the folks in the house usually stay there. Frankly, it's easier to serve them notice when they are required to appear in court.

Also, there was no real check. It's the story to avoid criminal trespass. It becomes a civil matter.
 
2014-07-24 07:30:27 AM  
Stake out the place and as soon as they leave change the locks.
 
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