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(NBC News)   Red greenhouse grows veggies for Mars, is held together with duct tape   (nbcnews.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting  
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1575 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jul 2014 at 1:11 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-23 12:29:47 PM  
Approveshttp://indianapublicmedia.org/about/files/2010/08/red_green. jpg
 
2014-07-23 12:40:58 PM  
All that red light makes me stabby
 
2014-07-23 01:14:53 PM  
What you did there...
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I see it.
 
2014-07-23 01:33:53 PM  
www.bbc.co.uk

Uh-oh
 
2014-07-23 01:36:54 PM  
Dammit Cohegan!  Give dah people dah arugula!
 
2014-07-23 01:37:22 PM  
Reminds me of an international space apps challenge project.  Having food already growing on Mars or the Moon would be a really good thing before you launch the ship with the astronauts.
 
2014-07-23 01:42:08 PM  
Been there, done that.
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
But it involved a lot more Maritain soil + astronaut feces.
 
2014-07-23 01:45:40 PM  
What next a mars rover converted from a Cordoba?
 
2014-07-23 02:00:01 PM  
Normal atmosphere, normal fertilizer, just changing the lights = pointless.

You want to impress me, show me martian soil + fertilizer, martian atmosphere (what little there is), and martian light.

Then, once you have plants acclimatized to that, remove the fertilizer.
 
2014-07-23 02:15:33 PM  

tarkin1: Normal atmosphere, normal fertilizer, just changing the lights = pointless.

You want to impress me, show me martian soil + fertilizer, martian atmosphere (what little there is), and martian light.

Then, once you have plants acclimatized to that, remove the fertilizer.


They're not using normal fertilizer. They're recycling urine. It makes sense.  And why would you try to use martian atmosphere? That seems like a more long-term goal. The short term goals should be things like immediately being able to feed a small colony of scientists/colonists. The plants could filter the air and the water, the lights could be solar powered.
 
2014-07-23 02:15:34 PM  
Quando omni flunkus, mortati
 
2014-07-23 02:20:10 PM  
lifeasahuman.com

If the Martian women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
 
2014-07-23 02:31:30 PM  
Saiga410: What next a mars rover converted from a Cordoba?

Naw - Gotta be a K-Car!

/Just keep Edgar away from them booster rockets!
//Keep your stick on the ice!
///I'm pullin' for ya - we're all in this together.
 
2014-07-23 02:32:53 PM  

tarkin1: Then, once you have plants acclimatized to that, remove the fertilizer.


Here you go
 
2014-07-23 03:16:15 PM  

tarkin1: You want to impress me, show me martian soil + fertilizer, martian atmosphere (what little there is), and martian light.


That should be one of our next experiments.

Screw driving around in the dirt ... let's launch a few biolabs up there to see WTF (if anything) grows.
 
2014-07-23 04:15:24 PM  
I came to make both Red Green and The Martian references and I've already been beaten.

Sometimes, I really love/hate you, Fark.
 
2014-07-23 04:21:55 PM  

MrSteve007: Been there, done that.

But it involved a lot more Maritain soil + astronaut feces.


That was a fun book. He actually managed to make a really compelling story out of what really boiled do to making the numbers add up for various life and death calculations.
 
2014-07-23 05:31:51 PM  

Unoriginal_Username: If the Martian women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.


Came here to say exactly this.
 
2014-07-23 06:11:53 PM  
I'm a man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess.
 
2014-07-23 06:25:35 PM  

edmo: Approveshttp://indianapublicmedia.org/about/files/2010/08/red_green. jpg


Niiice.

Mostly tests like this are just proving what we already know: Food can be grown but it will be complicated and expensive because there's no real dirt or air on Mars. But even the weak sunlight of Mars can be used, in theory, we're pretty sure.

There is still radiation though. This test doesn't try to simulate that but it's been tested on space stations and quick Earth-orbiting flights.

This: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plants_in_space
led me to this: http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/134/1/215.full <- TL;DR low pressure is ok for humans if you up the oxygen, but the same doesn't work for plants
and this: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/800.ht m l <- This was just put out, says the analysis isn't entirely done yet. They found mostly radiation doesn't matter. Algae developed a mutant strain better adapted to space: After flight, the mutant cells displayed a higher photosynthetic performance and a faster rate of re-growth indicating a higher capacity of stress recovering. The enhanced capability to survive the cosmic adverse conditions has been related to a particular localization of the amino acid substitution in the D-1 structure.

That sounds like adaptation to more light supply and rad damage.
 
2014-07-24 04:12:23 AM  
Just as long as that isn't duct tape forever.
 
2014-07-24 10:36:36 AM  
Good idea growing cucumbers, possibly the least nutritious vegetable ever.
 
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