Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(USA Today)   What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?   (usatoday.com) divider line 39
    More: Interesting, Major League Baseball, Tony LaRussa, Todd Frazier, Mike Redmond, mulligan, Terry Francona, All-Star break, outfielders  
•       •       •

1111 clicks; posted to Sports » on 21 Jul 2014 at 12:08 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2014-07-21 10:28:15 AM  
Baseball needed something to slow it down so more commercials could be aired.  Good job.
 
2014-07-21 10:31:08 AM  

oldernell: Baseball needed something to slow it down so more commercials could be aired. Good job.


Yeah, remember when replay was going to save time over manager arguments?

What a great idea. Now managers stroll out to ask the umpire what he had for dinner last night while someone on the team staff with a TV frantically watches a replay to see if it's worth challenging.
 
2014-07-21 10:53:58 AM  
I don't mind it, actually.
 
2014-07-21 10:56:33 AM  

rotsky: I don't mind it, actually.


Yeah, me neither

/it doesn't seem to be overused, and I've seen several bad calls reversed
//sometimes against my team
 
2014-07-21 11:53:00 AM  
Remember when people actually tried to submit witty headlines:

Submitted headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?
Actual headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?

It's like you're not even trying anymore.
 
2014-07-21 12:11:12 PM  

BunkoSquad: oldernell: Baseball needed something to slow it down so more commercials could be aired. Good job.

Yeah, remember when replay was going to save time over manager arguments?

What a great idea. Now managers stroll out to ask the umpire what he had for dinner last night while someone on the team staff with a TV frantically watches a replay to see if it's worth challenging.


A total of about five minutes per game is now spent ensuring that blown calls are corrected. The horror.
 
2014-07-21 12:16:31 PM  
I like it. Umpires should be about fairly and correctly adjudicating the game. Anything that improves the correct call being made in a reasonable time is in my eyes a good thing.

Adding 5 minutes to a game is not, in my opinion, such a big deal.
 
2014-07-21 12:18:07 PM  

netizencain: Remember when people actually tried to submit witty headlines:

Submitted headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?
Actual headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?

It's like you're not even trying anymore.


worldonline.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com
The easy way out.

/not subby
 
2014-07-21 12:19:22 PM  

netizencain: Remember when people actually tried to submit witty headlines:

Submitted headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?
Actual headline: What are the early returns on MLB instant replay?

It's like you're not even trying anymore.


I submitted this comment with funnier content.
 
2014-07-21 12:24:11 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: rotsky: I don't mind it, actually.

Yeah, me neither

/it doesn't seem to be overused, and I've seen several bad calls reversed
//sometimes against my team


Yep. It came in handy during the Pirate game on Saturday.
 
2014-07-21 12:28:25 PM  
It could be quicker, and should be automatically triggered more often, but overall it's a great improvement for the sport over the previous policy of "just live with the obviously wrong call that everyone sitting at home has seen 100 replays of"
 
2014-07-21 12:28:58 PM  

nmrsnr: I like it. Umpires should be about fairly and correctly adjudicating the game. Anything that improves the correct call being made in a reasonable time is in my eyes a good thing.

Adding 5 minutes to a game is not, in my opinion, such a big deal.


Yes, and who is watching the game? A fan of either team. Is the fan of the team that won the challenge complaining about the added 5 min? I don't think so.

Basically the time complainers are sore losers. That 5 min break didn't go your way? Boo hoo. The manager would have yelled and screamed for 3 min so you're really whining about an extra 2 min. Give me a break.
 
2014-07-21 12:29:58 PM  
Boring as crap if you're in the stands. Weight-of-evidence necessary to overrule is poorly understood by fans. Solves a minor problem that, in the long run, evened out and didn't favor any team over another.
 
2014-07-21 12:35:07 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Boring as crap if you're in the stands. Weight-of-evidence necessary to overrule is poorly understood by fans. Solves a minor problem that, in the long run, evened out and didn't favor any team over another.


Use the extra five minutes to wash down another Ritalin.
 
2014-07-21 12:42:40 PM  
On the whole I like it, but two things in particular need to be cleaned up:

1) the manager taking a leisurely stroll to the ump while the bench coach is on the phone to a booth waiting to give the manager a thumbs-up/thumbs-down. I HATE this. Not sure what rule could be changed/enacted to deter it, but it's what sours me most on replay.

2) why does it sometimes take the MLB home office 5 minutes to determine something the TV broadcasters figured out in 15 seconds?
 
2014-07-21 12:45:14 PM  

Cagey B: A total of about five minutes per game is now spent ensuring that blown calls are corrected. The horror.


It's not even that.  FTA:
1) Managers had challenged 606 calls in heading into the All-Star break - that's once every 2.35 games.
2) Of those, 52% (318) were overturned.
3) There have been more stands than confirmed (192 to 153), and the difficulty of those calls is indicated by the average 2:22 review time when stands is the ruling, compared with 1:22 for those confirmed and the 1:50 average overall.

+110 seconds every 2.35 games means replays are adding 47 seconds to each baseball game.

And yes, managers occasionally walk out to ask the umpire about a call while they decide if a replay is worth it, but they did that anyway before replay, because it's largely about influencing the next call.

Want to shave that 47 seconds back?  Start enforcing the existing 12-second rule on the pitcher, cut down on how often you grant time out to the batter, and you're probably lopping off 10 minutes without any new rules on the books.
 
2014-07-21 12:48:27 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Weight-of-evidence necessary to overrule is poorly understood by fans.


I actually wish that they'd give the home plate ump a mic a-la football so he can say "after reviewing the play X" so that we actually know WTF the call was an why.

This would have helped the case on Friday(?) in the Nats/Brewers game where Span, who was safe, was called out, and Rendon, who was out, was called safe.
 
2014-07-21 12:51:09 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Solves a minor problem that, in the long run, evened out and didn't favor any team over another.


I'm not certain that's true.  There's a lot of evidence, for example, that umpires adjust the size of the strike zone and make the plate appearance more "competitive":

cdn.fangraphs.comcdn.fangraphs.com
"The strike zone in 3-0 counts (sample size (n): 3,665 called pitches) has an area of 3.73 square feet (sq. ft.) while the strike zone in 0-2 counts (n: 12,339) shrinks down to 2.39 sq. ft., a size about 64% as big."  Whether this is intentional or not is impossible to tell, but something makes umpires favor the underdog.

With this huge bias on a simple call, it's entirely possible that some teams are treated differently by umpires.  Maybe the umpires unconsciously give the benefit of the doubt to "good" players.  Maybe the umpires simply don't like certain teams/managers and their bias creeps into their job.  Etc.  I wouldn't take it as a given that all error is random here.
 
2014-07-21 12:52:28 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Boring as crap if you're in the stands. Weight-of-evidence necessary to overrule is poorly understood by fans. Solves a minor problem that, in the long run, evened out and didn't favor any team over another.


On the plus side, I guess they're now showing replays on the video boards now during challenges.  They didn't previously show close plays at the stadium.  So at least the fans at the game can see what people at home get to see.
 
2014-07-21 12:53:40 PM  
Three reviews in the Sox/Astros game on Saturday. Umps overturned all three times. Two of the plays were blindingly obviously incorrectly called watching live in the stands, so I don't know how they screwed them up on the field in the first place, but it's good to get them correct.
 
2014-07-21 01:07:15 PM  
Over time, I'd expect two offsetting trends here:

1) Managers will their replays more.  Any unused replay was wasted, and even if you think there's a 25% chance you're right, it's a smart gamble given how rarely you "need" one now.  (About 1 overturn per 4.7 games.)
2) The replays will get faster.  They're all being done by a central hub, and they'll get more efficient procedures and build skill among the staff.  They'll also evolve their hardware after too many choruses of "If we only had a camera right *there* this call would be easy.", and just taking advantage of the higher resolution and frame rate you can affordably get each year.  If they're smart, they'll start putting in dedicated systems like the ones they use in tennis for fair/foul calls, use that to digitally extend the foul pole for high HR calls, etc.  It wouldn't be hard to put a little vibration sensor in first base and superimpose any impacts to the base (the runner's will be the sharpest) onto the video or audio feeds.  All of this would be invisible to the fans-- they'd just notice that the replay booth always seems to get the call right even though they don't spend much time looking, and it would cost a lot less than any of the 90 giant digital boards every stadium has these days.
 
2014-07-21 01:26:20 PM  
One thing that I noticed is that players now frantically point to the dugout on close plays. Before they would confront the ump and risk ejection. Players can now wildly exclaim, "Hey, this guy just farked up his job!" with no repercussions. I wonder how that's sitting in the mind of umpires these days. In ten years it will be 'part of the game' but this year it still has to burn them up.
 
2014-07-21 01:42:42 PM  

chimp_ninja: Wellon Dowd: Solves a minor problem that, in the long run, evened out and didn't favor any team over another.

I'm not certain that's true.  There's a lot of evidence, for example, that umpires adjust the size of the strike zone and make the plate appearance more "competitive":

[cdn.fangraphs.com image 480x480][cdn.fangraphs.com image 480x480]
"The strike zone in 3-0 counts (sample size (n): 3,665 called pitches) has an area of 3.73 square feet (sq. ft.) while the strike zone in 0-2 counts (n: 12,339) shrinks down to 2.39 sq. ft., a size about 64% as big."  Whether this is intentional or not is impossible to tell, but something makes umpires favor the underdog.

With this huge bias on a simple call, it's entirely possible that some teams are treated differently by umpires.  Maybe the umpires unconsciously give the benefit of the doubt to "good" players.  Maybe the umpires simply don't like certain teams/managers and their bias creeps into their job.  Etc.  I wouldn't take it as a given that all error is random here.


Here's another article with fun graphs from Fivethirtyeight.

Change in strikes called with 3 balls:
lh5.googleusercontent.com

Change in strike calls with two strikes:
lh6.googleusercontent.com
 
2014-07-21 02:12:08 PM  
I had reservations about the instant replay in baseball, but it's being implemented well and I'm liking it.
 
2014-07-21 02:28:56 PM  
How about they actually deal with the whole "SS doesn't come within 5 feet of touching the bag on a DP but we'll give it to him so he doesn't get clobbered by a runner" thing?
 
2014-07-21 02:44:56 PM  

Henry Holland: How about they actually deal with the whole "SS doesn't come within 5 feet of touching the bag on a DP but we'll give it to him so he doesn't get clobbered by a runner" thing?


If a manager challenges it, it'll get overturned, but there's a reason managers tend not to get riled up about the "neighborhood play".
 
2014-07-21 03:36:00 PM  

The Bestest: Henry Holland: How about they actually deal with the whole "SS doesn't come within 5 feet of touching the bag on a DP but we'll give it to him so he doesn't get clobbered by a runner" thing?

If a manager challenges it, it'll get overturned, but there's a reason managers tend not to get riled up about the "neighborhood play".


It shouldn't get overturned, because the neighborhood play is specifically excluded from replay. Also, if it's really five feet the SS will never get the call. Usually he actually does have contact with the bag, and when he doesn't, it's more a matter of timing when he had the ball vs when he swiped his foot across the bag. I'd guess at most 6" to a foot, and if that prevents guys from getting crippling leg injuries so be it -- it's not like it affects one team more than any other.
 
2014-07-21 03:37:30 PM  
I don't love replay because I'm a bit of a purist (scrap the DH, etc), but it's worked out relatively well I think. Like most, though, I think they've got to stop managers from coming out and wasting time while the guy in the dugout checks the replay. If you want to challenge it needs to be the first thing you say when you come out of the dugout, or you should have to throw a red flag from inside the dugout, or whatever.
 
2014-07-21 03:42:06 PM  

The Bestest: On the whole I like it, but two things in particular need to be cleaned up:

1) the manager taking a leisurely stroll to the ump while the bench coach is on the phone to a booth waiting to give the manager a thumbs-up/thumbs-down. I HATE this. Not sure what rule could be changed/enacted to deter it, but it's what sours me most on replay.

2) why does it sometimes take the MLB home office 5 minutes to determine something the TV broadcasters figured out in 15 seconds?


Simple, make it that if a manager walks out and doesn't challenge the play, he must remove a player from the field. Either the next batter or pitcher depending on who is batting at the time.
 
2014-07-21 03:52:41 PM  

dukeblue219: I don't love replay because I'm a bit of a purist (scrap the DH, etc), but it's worked out relatively well I think. Like most, though, I think they've got to stop managers from coming out and wasting time while the guy in the dugout checks the replay. If you want to challenge it needs to be the first thing you say when you come out of the dugout, or you should have to throw a red flag from inside the dugout, or whatever.


In most of the games I've seen, that hasn't really been too onerous. If anything, it takes less time than the cursory "I'm going to come out and work the umpire, maybe ask if he'll consult with the other three, but be super pleasant and professional about it, because it's not worth getting tossed at this point in the game" crap that used to go on.
 
2014-07-21 04:00:50 PM  

Henry Holland: How about they actually deal with the whole "SS doesn't come within 5 feet of touching the bag on a DP but we'll give it to him so he doesn't get clobbered by a runner" thing?


That one came up twice in one week with Andrelton Simmons of the Braves. The first one was against the Mets. The call was that Simmons was off the bag, so the runner at second was called safe. The Met's announcers were complaining that even though the call benefitted their team, it was a bad call...and replay SHOULD'VE overturned it. The reasoning from Keith Hernandez was "What do you want him to do...stand on the base and get spiked? Nobody wants to see a superstar shortstop get put on the DL for this!" or something of the sort.

If you dislike the "in-the-vicinity" rule, that's fine, but keep in mind that the "neighborhood" rule is in the rule book as an exception to the "must tag the base" rule. The shortstop is not required to have a foot on the bag specifically to prevent injuries in DP situations. But the exception IS in the rule book.
 
2014-07-21 04:07:28 PM  
The manager should not have the luxury of getting someone in the clubhouse to watch the replay 5 times to be absolutely sure they want to challenge as he jaunts out onto the field.  If it's egregious enough that you feel the need to come on the field and question it, it automatically counts as one of your challenges (unless it's umpire initiated).  Anything beyond that and the manager gets ejected.

It's better than nothing, but it could also pretty easily be better than it is.  You mean to tell me that they can't just add an extra ump at every game to sit in the press booth and watch the broadcast?  This "calling New York" thing is farking Andy Griffith show old-timey.
 
2014-07-21 05:02:18 PM  

dukeblue219: I don't love replay because I'm a bit of a purist (scrap the DH, etc), but it's worked out relatively well I think. Like most, though, I think they've got to stop managers from coming out and wasting time while the guy in the dugout checks the replay. If you want to challenge it needs to be the first thing you say when you come out of the dugout, or you should have to throw a red flag from inside the dugout, or whatever.


What do you think of experimental rule 7.13?  This seems to be causing a lot more headaches.
 
2014-07-21 05:32:44 PM  
chimp_ninja:  Start enforcing the existing 12-second rule on the pitcher

I believe this is the cure to many of baseball's ills. Faster paced game, less dead time, more offense.
 
2014-07-21 08:47:41 PM  
What amazes me is that they spend five minutes on a replay, and still get the call wrong. The replay official is an umpire too, and they've always been more about protecting their own egos than calling a fair game or getting the call right.
 
2014-07-21 09:24:05 PM  
Sin_City_Superhero: If you dislike the "in-the-vicinity" rule, that's fine, but keep in mind that the "neighborhood" rule is in the rule book as an exception to the "must tag the base" rule. The shortstop is not required to have a foot on the bag specifically to prevent injuries in DP situations. But the exception IS in the rule book.

Apologies to all that replied to my post, I didn't know that the "in-the-vicinity" rule was codified in the rule book, I thought it was one of the "unwritten" rules that baseball loves.

/Hangs head in shame

senorpogo: I believe this is the cure to many of baseball's ills. Faster paced game, less dead time, more offense.

CSB time: I went to an Angels day game in June and the game was moving fairly quickly, the Angels had a 6-1 lead after the 7th. My buddy and I thought "Cool, we'll beat the gridlock on the way home". Then the Angels crap bullpen was called on to pitch the top of the 8th and the game just died, three pitching changes in two innings. The Twins also had three pitching changes, they seem to take forever.
 
2014-07-21 09:42:47 PM  
Part of the importance of baseball to young men is teaching them that a team relies on their individual achievement, and that in some instances, they will be held accountable for unfair situations. They must learn to account for life not going their way, adjust, and fight on with good sportsmanship.  It's not a fun lesson to learn, and some boys never learn it, but it is absolutely necessary to becoming a man, instead of a man sized child.

Some people will never understand that winning or "getting the call right" isn't always the most important thing.  I feel sorry for those people.
 
2014-07-21 10:46:36 PM  

ManofPeas: Part of the importance of baseball to young men is teaching them that a team relies on their individual achievement, and that in some instances, they will be held accountable for unfair situations. They must learn to account for life not going their way, adjust, and fight on with good sportsmanship.  It's not a fun lesson to learn, and some boys never learn it, but it is absolutely necessary to becoming a man, instead of a man sized child.

Some people will never understand that winning or "getting the call right" isn't always the most important thing.  I feel sorry for those people.


And yet every person I've ever met (excepting one) who played baseball was a walking douchenozzle of well-nigh epic proportions.  So baseball is evidently failing with its primary objective with the traditional fark-all officiating standard.  Why don't we try actually calling the game right and see if we can lower the number of coontstain baseball players.?  Because I seriously cannot see how that metric could get worse
 
2014-07-22 01:37:58 AM  

ManofPeas: Part of the importance of baseball to young men is teaching them that a team relies on their individual achievement, and that in some instances, they will be held accountable for unfair situations. They must learn to account for life not going their way, adjust, and fight on with good sportsmanship.  It's not a fun lesson to learn, and some boys never learn it, but it is absolutely necessary to becoming a man, instead of a man sized child.

Some people will never understand that winning or "getting the call right" isn't always the most important thing.  I feel sorry for those people.


This is a lesson for Little League, not an $8 billion a year sport
 
Displayed 39 of 39 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report