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(Phys Org2)   Looking at Earth as an exoplanet - are there any detectable signs of intelligent life on this mess?   (phys.org) divider line 21
    More: Unlikely, Earth, Lunar Eclipse, solar eclipses, irrelevance, European Extremely Large Telescope, refraction, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide  
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2249 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Jul 2014 at 11:40 AM (8 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-21 09:42:14 AM
i.imgur.com

No.
 
2014-07-21 11:57:26 AM
Head over to the Politics tab for your answer
 
2014-07-21 12:00:39 PM
Nobody here's seen Galaxyquest yet? We've been pumping broadcasts out since however long -- into SPACE
31.media.tumblr.com

/from a board of guys talking about whacking off to Sigourney -- thanks google
//oh my -- it's twice as big as it is on the source page -- bonus!
 
2014-07-21 12:06:05 PM
Nope
 
2014-07-21 12:09:55 PM
I remember reading Carl Sagans cosmos at a young age and there was a section on trying to determine if a planet was inhabited by looking at satellite photos, and what resolution would be needed to see evidence of civilization. It blew my mind. I guess I had just assumed you could look at the earth from space and say, yarp, people down there.

And how difficult would it be to detect our civilization before we littered space with satellites or before electric lights dotted the globe at night? We haven't been blasting em signals in all directions for very long.
 
2014-07-21 12:35:22 PM

miniflea: I remember reading Carl Sagans cosmos at a young age and there was a section on trying to determine if a planet was inhabited by looking at satellite photos, and what resolution would be needed to see evidence of civilization. It blew my mind. I guess I had just assumed you could look at the earth from space and say, yarp, people down there.

And how difficult would it be to detect our civilization before we littered space with satellites or before electric lights dotted the globe at night? We haven't been blasting em signals in all directions for very long.


And hell, if there were intelligent life on other planets, they wouldn't know ours had it, either, mainly because the best candidate exoplanets for life are far more than 200 light-years away (200 years ago being Earth's Industrial Revolution, of course). So even if we're blasting signals in all directions, it hasn't even reached those planets yet, and won't until long after we're gone.
 
2014-07-21 12:40:41 PM
Well subby if you are searching, I would recommend avoiding the politics tab..
 
2014-07-21 12:46:50 PM
Life....yes.
Intelligent life.........no.
 
2014-07-21 01:20:26 PM
You can easily tell that there's life on earth because its atmosphere is in chemical disequilibrium.

I would think there's a qualitative difference between the atmospheric chemical disequilibrium of a planet with stupid life and a planet with intelligent life. I guess you could measure what proportion of the atmospheric contents could not possibly be the products of metabolism.
 
2014-07-21 02:14:29 PM

with great power comes great insanity: You can easily tell that there's life on earth because its atmosphere is in chemical disequilibrium.

I would think there's a qualitative difference between the atmospheric chemical disequilibrium of a planet with stupid life and a planet with intelligent life. I guess you could measure what proportion of the atmospheric contents could not possibly be the products of metabolism.


Freon?  I don't think it existed naturally.  If you can detect it wouldn't that mean life smart enough to engage in industrial chemistry?  I seriously don't know.  I just remember something about archaeologists finding a lead sealed coffin that predated freon, and they tested for it to see if the coffin had leaked.  Can't remember why it was important.

Also, I might have been stoned and immagined the whole thing.
 
2014-07-21 02:36:02 PM

with great power comes great insanity: I guess you could measure what proportion of the atmospheric contents could not possibly be the products of metabolism.


Intredasting. I'd never heard of that before. That would give us a pretty good probabilistic answer once we can see another world well enough.

Only probabilistic for two reasons: Firstly atmospheric disequilibrium can come from chemical reactions in the rocks (geochemical). For example Mars clearly has enough methane around it to probably have microbial life. But that isn't necessarily a sign of life, although it's interesting as hell.

Secondly we can't be sure what is/isn't metabolism until we see the actual metabolizer. So it's unlikely natural metabolism would throw lots of... platinum compounds? into the air but it's not we'll be sure until we get pictures up close.

(This is why relying on ET life to be like Earth life is not exactly a perfect answer, but it's worth going with until we have a better idea. Earth life is actually largely based on the easiest/most flexible/most believable kinds of chemistry that we can imagine in the universe. Carbon, for example, is common enough in the universe and is the best element for playing tinkertoys with any other elements. Silicon is a close second but not quite. And water is pretty common in the universe and a solvent.)
 
2014-07-21 03:24:31 PM
All the intelligent life left already. They're coming back for me though. Those guys are always messing around.

Guys?
 
2014-07-21 03:45:59 PM
"Intelligence" might well turn out to be a horribly relative term if we ever meet another "intelligent" race. I hope we aren't the apex.
 
2014-07-21 03:56:41 PM
Easiest way is to see the planet at night. If you are on the planet you can easily see satellites most clear nights
 
2014-07-21 04:06:04 PM
No,,, even as a matter of fact, there is increased orbital debris that is both significant in mass and a concurrent uptick in heavy atmospheric materials subsequently identified as the markers of a self-sourced planets volcanism rebirthing its last burps of thermal energy.
 
2014-07-21 04:22:07 PM
perhaps signs of an industrial society but does that mean intelligence?
 
2014-07-21 05:27:26 PM
First, send people to the move...establish a base...and look back on Earth.

Second, send people to Mars...establish a base, if possible...and look back on Earth.
Repeat...as you get further & further out.


Can't use the space station, they can see things that close.
Perhaps as a baseline...
 
2014-07-21 06:37:33 PM

bmwericus: perhaps signs of an industrial society but does that mean intelligence?


They all seem to have issues not moving around, both in surviving during the keeping with the moving and with settling for a single objective goal, as if only waiting to pack up and BLEVE
 
2014-07-21 07:53:22 PM

big pig peaches: All the intelligent life left already. They're coming back for me though. Those guys are always messing around.

Guys?


Good luck with that. I have been checking my Sub-Etha Sens-O-Matic for years, and all I get is a big nothing. I'd almost be willing to hitch on a Vogon craft at this point.
 
2014-07-21 11:50:04 PM
No.  This is an intergalactic lunatic asylum.
 
2014-07-22 06:24:50 AM
Could be worse. Could have a mass extinction caused by a dirty telephone.
 
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