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(Oregon Live)   Portland unveils plan to use bicycles to deliver supplies after Cascadia earthquake destroys bridges and roads. FARK: They are evidently serious   (oregonlive.com ) divider line
    More: Asinine  
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5091 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2014 at 12:48 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-20 09:55:13 AM  
No, it's real. When then earthquake hits, ride your bike to the meeting area on the beach.  Await instructions.
 
2014-07-20 10:19:03 AM  
And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.
 
2014-07-20 10:19:06 AM  
Sounds like a great idea to me and good for them for planning ahead.
 
2014-07-20 10:59:13 AM  

Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.


How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?
 
2014-07-20 11:10:06 AM  

mr_a: Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.

How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?



African, or European?
 
2014-07-20 11:12:19 AM  
I can see how bicycles might deliver emergency supplies of smug.

/Still not looking forward to Hipstergeddon.
 
2014-07-20 11:37:59 AM  

Snarfangel: mr_a: Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.

How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?


African, or European?


I think the Asians have it covered

cargocycling.org
 
2014-07-20 11:40:11 AM  
Human ingenuity...

www.worldwidecyclingatlas.com
 
2014-07-20 12:16:00 PM  
This will be made obsolete by Amazon delivery drones.
 
2014-07-20 12:53:41 PM  
Low tech can work.

A realistic local  plan that could be immediately implemented is better then just saying the federal government has trucks and can help us.  See Hurricane Katrina and go brownie for that.
 
2014-07-20 12:55:21 PM  
You will still have to pay the Arts Tax though.
 
2014-07-20 12:57:09 PM  
Not a bad idea to have an emergency plan, and the northwest is scarily due for something, what with the subduction zone being all crazy.

However, bikes probably won't work.  In the event of a huge earthquake, the debris in the road will flatten bike tires in no time.  Unless they also have a plan for replacing everybody's wheels with some thick ass treads...
 
2014-07-20 12:57:47 PM  
Fred and Carrie are on it.

wp.streetwise.co
 
2014-07-20 12:58:52 PM  

mr_a: Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.

How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?


There are bike trailers rated for 300 lbs.  I doubt the tons of supplies all need to go to the same address, and at the same time.
 
2014-07-20 12:59:04 PM  
Is there a panel in Portland that just sits around and comes up with things to make themselves seem hip and original?
I could see this happening, rich hippies need something to do after retirement at 30 years of age.
 
2014-07-20 12:59:16 PM  
You seem to forget what the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army did with bicycles.
 
2014-07-20 12:59:20 PM  
What's fail-ish about using a vehicle that doesn't need fuel or food in a situation where supply lines are cut, exactly?

Seems more like basic common sense.  You can tell by the way it never occurs to anyone in a zombie movie, where characters are contractually obligated to never use common sense at any time under penalty of death by deus ex machina.
 
2014-07-20 12:59:38 PM  
Do they have a separate drill day for Cargo Goats and High Speed delivery dogs ?
 
2014-07-20 12:59:51 PM  
Don't count out PDX's emergency response secret weapon: unicycling darthvader with flaming bagpipes. He will rally our hipster saviors like none other...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnVjkE87FDY
 
2014-07-20 01:00:04 PM  
Oh, bicycle repairman!

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2014-07-20 01:03:31 PM  
It worked for the Viet Cong on the Ho Chi Minh trail, so why not here? When I was a teen, we modified a kid's push scooter into a narrow-track cargo carrier to haul beer up into the canyons so we could party. They came with a hand brake and a nice flat space on a double-frame and were good up to 125 pounds, if I recall correctly.
Easy to push up a foot path or deer trail, and on the downhill stretches, we'd just ride 'em. They also made it easier to pack out the empties so we didn't get nicked by the rangers when they saw us the next morning. We'd just tell 'em we camped at a site and saw it needed cleaning, and they let us be.

I'd wager you could strap two hundred pounds or more on an average bike with no problem. Just rig up a tiller on the handlebars to one side and another on the seat post. Great idea, actually.
 
2014-07-20 01:04:29 PM  

mr_a: Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.

How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?


Ypu're right.  Lay down and die.
 
2014-07-20 01:05:37 PM  

stagepoke: You seem to forget what the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army did with bicycles.


You beat me to it.

Cheers.
 
2014-07-20 01:05:43 PM  

mr_a: Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.

How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?


And your alternative would be what, exactly? When truck roads are impassable, rails trashed, and airfields churned to pieces?

In 1801, the City of London had over *1 million* people. One million. You know how they were supplied? Horse- and ox-drawn carts. And that wasn't just emergency supplies, it included luxury goods too. Greater Portland, has 2.3 million, but they won't need silks and petit-fours. It'll be starvation rations until the airfields and rails can be replaced-- and basic sustenance after that, until enough "last mile" truck roads are repaired-- but they'll survive.

The advantage of bicycles over horse teams is that they don't require food and water. You don't lose half your supply train feeding them. They don't need rest breaks. And if they break, they're cheap and easy to replace.
 
2014-07-20 01:06:54 PM  
I was in New Jersey after Sandy when fuel was rationed or unavailable. If it were a bicycle-saturated area like Portland, you bet people would have been very happy to make use of 2-wheel delivery
 
2014-07-20 01:08:00 PM  
After Hurricane Sandy,  a lot of bikes were used to bring supplies to some of the hardest hit areas of Staten Island until the roads were cleared-up.  Not only they can get past much narrower paths, a couple of people can carry it over larger debris then continue riding on the other side.
 
2014-07-20 01:10:49 PM  
Considering how Portland is having a very difficult time modernizing infrastructure, this may be one of the best short-term options available.

I hope we never have to make use of it in my lifetime.
 
2014-07-20 01:10:51 PM  

brimed03: In 1801, the City of London had over *1 million* people. One million. You know how they were supplied? Horse- and ox-drawn carts. And that wasn't just emergency supplies, it included luxury goods too. Greater Portland, has 2.3 million, but they won't need silks and petit-fours. It'll be starvation rations until the airfields and rails can be replaced-- and basic sustenance after that, until enough "last mile" truck roads are repaired-- but they'll survive.


Or you could use those bikes to evacuate people to a location that doesn't have a disrupted supply line.  If things get so bad that bikes are the best way to bring supplies in, it'd probably be better to just get the people out.
 
2014-07-20 01:11:08 PM  

pivazena: Not a bad idea to have an emergency plan, and the northwest is scarily due for something, what with the subduction zone being all crazy.

However, bikes probably won't work.  In the event of a huge earthquake, the debris in the road will flatten bike tires in no time.  Unless they also have a plan for replacing everybody's wheels with some thick ass treads...


Bikes will work fine. You send crews in ahead of them clearing a path, filling in potholes with tamped earth or macadam, building temporary bridges (glorified planks) across road seams. Set up repair stations along the route. And sure, if you can find them or make them quickly, use solid tires instead of encased air-filled inner tubes.
 
2014-07-20 01:12:49 PM  

pivazena: Not a bad idea to have an emergency plan, and the northwest is scarily due for something, what with the subduction zone being all crazy.

However, bikes probably won't work.  In the event of a huge earthquake, the debris in the road will flatten bike tires in no time.  Unless they also have a plan for replacing everybody's wheels with some thick ass treads...


Would you like for me to explain how this works, or do revel in your profound ignorance?
 
2014-07-20 01:12:51 PM  

mr_a: How many tons of supplies do you think a city the size of Portland might need in an emergency? And what is the cargo capacity of an average bicycle?


The serious answer to this question is that even a shiatty road bike can easily tack 100 lbs on in addition to the rider, which is roughly twice what a backpacker running at full weight will take for a 8-10 day hike.  So call it emergency food and water for 10 people for a day per load. Portland's got a population of about 600k, generally speaking 90% or so of a city that size is typically evacuated in relatively short order, so you need something like 6000 bike trips per day if the place is hit by something on par with New Orleans' most recent aquatic adventure.

Assume that a volunteer or set of volunteers can make 6 trips in a day pretty easily, and that means you need about 1000 bikes to respond to your call for runs.

Back of the envelope, obviously, but you can see that logistically the scale of what you need to do this is far from being insurmountable.
 
2014-07-20 01:13:38 PM  
In case of earthquake I'll contribute my Cannondale Jekyll 4 Mountain bike with the way cool Walmart dish rack wire tied to the back that I use to carry cargo for my work commute.

The problem, of course, is that anybody trying to deliver stuff via bike during the post quake mayhem will get their asses bikejacked immediately. Because, you know, hipsters don't believe in guns...

During the various middle east crisis's, and we were expecting gasoline to disappear for a while, I thought It'd be pretty cool biking down an empty I-95 through Philly to work . Of course, I then realized I would have lasted about 15 minutes before the Phine Phokes of Philly would have relieved me of my bike, and possibly my life.
 
2014-07-20 01:14:11 PM  

litespeed74: Is there a panel in Portland that just sits around and comes up with things to make themselves seem hip and original?
I could see this happening, rich hippies need something to do after retirement at 30 years of age.


Since well before 9/11, emergency planning has been a professionalized endeavor. Since 9/11, you can't go a dozen campuses without tripping over a half-dozen masters programs in emergency management. And the positions pay very, very well.
 
2014-07-20 01:14:50 PM  
Didn't the Japanese take Singapore via bicycle?
 
2014-07-20 01:16:15 PM  

Dinki: And just how is this asinine? In a major earthquake many roads will be unpassable for large vehicles. A system of bicycles might just do the trick.


Yeah, it would be hard to "roll coal" in a big pickup truck when the roads are torn up....

/ can't see those d-bags volunteering to help anyone else anyways.
 
2014-07-20 01:16:27 PM  

stagepoke: You seem to forget what the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army did with bicycles.


This.

This is one of the pitfalls with the American love of technology. We overlook and even ridicule low-tech alternatives, and are shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again.
 
2014-07-20 01:17:27 PM  
for some stuff yeah a Bike won't work but for some bicycles would get the job done.
 
2014-07-20 01:17:53 PM  
101st Logistical Hipster Bicyclist Brigade!
 
2014-07-20 01:19:03 PM  
"This system will not work perfectly, therefore we should do nothing"

fark you, submitter.
 
2014-07-20 01:20:25 PM  
Use one of those bar bikes that seats like 10 people, it could work. And while one bike can only carry X amount , 100 bikes doing the same could get it done. And kudos to the people mentioning the VC.
 
2014-07-20 01:21:52 PM  

litespeed74: Is there a panel in Portland that just sits around and comes up with things to make themselves seem hip and original?
I could see this happening, rich hippies need something to do after retirement at 30 years of age.


Yes.
 
2014-07-20 01:22:23 PM  

Jim_Callahan: What's fail-ish about using a vehicle that doesn't need fuel or food in a situation where supply lines are cut, exactly?

Seems more like basic common sense.  You can tell by the way it never occurs to anyone in a zombie movie, where characters are contractually obligated to never use common sense at any time under penalty of death by deus ex machina.


This. It's one of my issues with The Walking Dead. Every vehicle they use should have several dirt bikes strapped onto it for when the vehicle dies. Unless you're surrounded on all sides, you're always going to beat zombies. They may not get tired, but you cycle a mile out of view and then turn 90 degrees and keep going another mile. Bam, in five minutes you're safe; they don't know you turned and they keep going in your last known direction. You can even circle back around to where you originally were and finish what you were doing.
 
2014-07-20 01:22:54 PM  
This is one of the pitfalls with the American love of technology. We overlook and even ridicule low-tech alternatives, and are shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again.

There is a subset of Americans that appreciate bikes. It titillates my engineering glands that such a simple and cheap mechanical contrivance that so dramatically increase the travel range and carrying capacity of a human being. And the souper-cereal bike geeks with the carbon fiber frames, super engineered/optimized bike components made out of fancy alloys, the bike electronics, lights, gizmos, etc.
 
2014-07-20 01:22:56 PM  

brimed03: stagepoke: You seem to forget what the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army did with bicycles.

This.

This is one of the pitfalls with the American love of technology. We overlook and even ridicule low-tech alternatives, and are shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again.


Can you provide examples of America overlooking low-tech alternatives, which then caused the country to be "shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again."

I'm just saying you might want to put down that bottle of hyperbole and step back slowly.
 
2014-07-20 01:25:14 PM  

BSABSVR: "This system will not work perfectly, therefore we should do nothing"

fark you, submitter.


That is the real gist of the entire Republican side of any argument: "It isn't the perfect solution, therefore we cannot allow it, and if you try it, we'll make it against the law."

It's always the same.
 
2014-07-20 01:26:42 PM  
Subby sounds fat and lazy.
 
2014-07-20 01:26:59 PM  

brimed03: stagepoke: You seem to forget what the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army did with bicycles.

This.

This is one of the pitfalls with the American love of technology. We overlook and even ridicule low-tech alternatives, and are shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again.


Heh.  I usually "get told" when I point out that ham radio has a very valuable place in an emergency.  "Oh, I'll just use my cell phone".

No, you won't.  Because the billion dollar infrastructure you need to keep your smart phone smart will be down.  It'll be a fancy clock.

On the other hand, so long as I've got 12 volt DC available from batteries, a car, solar panels, whatever, I'm good to go.  I can communicate locally, or hundreds, or even thousands of miles away.  No infrastructure needed.
 
2014-07-20 01:27:23 PM  

redlegrick: It worked for the Viet Cong on the Ho Chi Minh trail, so why not here?


Just like the comic about "Taliban or Tea Party?" there should be a "Viet Cong or Portland City Council?"
 
2014-07-20 01:29:08 PM  

BSABSVR: "This system will not work perfectly, therefore we should do nothing"

fark you, submitter.


Yeah I was wondering if today's headline theme is "blatant stupidity that everyone in the comments section will make fun of." This doesn't apply to all the headlines today, but there have been a few glaring ones already.
 
2014-07-20 01:30:17 PM  

Sid_6.7: Can you provide examples of America overlooking low-tech alternatives, which then caused the country to be "shocked when it slaps us in the face. Again. And again."


Afghanistan
 
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