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(NBC 10 New England)   Every rose has its thorn, but not every thorn gives you flesh-eating bacteria that makes it necessary to amputate your hand   (turnto10.com ) divider line
    More: Scary  
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4952 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2014 at 10:30 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-20 10:00:58 AM  
Yeah it does.
 
2014-07-20 10:33:22 AM  
Groovy
 
2014-07-20 10:33:36 AM  
okay, but which necrotizing fasciitis was it?

Details wot are interesting, are interesting, FFS!!
 
2014-07-20 10:38:05 AM  
Technically roses have prickles, not thorns.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-20 10:39:12 AM  
I gave my love a cherry that had no stone,
I gave my love a chicken that had no bone,
I gave my love a rose that had no MRSA...
Oh, damn it did and wrecked this versa.
 
2014-07-20 10:39:53 AM  

uttertosh: okay, but which necrotizing fasciitis was it?

Details wot are interesting, are interesting, FFS!!


Lol journalism, amirite?
 
2014-07-20 10:41:45 AM  

ZAZ: I gave my love a cherry that had no stone,
I gave my love a chicken that had no bone,
I gave my love a rose that had no MRSA...
Oh, damn it did and wrecked this versa.


Lulz
 
2014-07-20 10:42:03 AM  
What bacteria was it? How did it get there? What the hell?
 
2014-07-20 10:42:12 AM  
House did this.
 
2014-07-20 10:46:06 AM  

ZAZ: I gave my love a cherry that had no stone,
I gave my love a chicken that had no bone,

 
2014-07-20 10:47:11 AM  

ZAZ: I gave my love a cherry that had no stone,
I gave my love a chicken that had no bone,



i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-20 11:13:36 AM  

ZAZ: I gave my love a chicken that had no bone,


animalsvietnam.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-20 11:14:18 AM  
Just like every amputee cowboy sings a sad, sad song.
 
2014-07-20 11:24:01 AM  
Well you gotta hand it to him, he's got a firm grip on dealing with his handicap.
 
2014-07-20 11:32:53 AM  

Hector Remarkable: Just like every amputee cowboy sings a sad, sad song.


Well he can't very well *play* it now, can he?
 
2014-07-20 11:44:35 AM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: What bacteria was it? How did it get there? What the hell?


Nearly every MRSA story seems to start with an everyday surface wound that happens without incident to people all the time, sometimes not even a cut but just a bruise.

It must just come down to bad luck--either the bacteria exists in random spots and you can only hope you don't come in contact with any; or, it's all over but only sets in as infection on rare but random occasions. Doesn't seem like there's any way to avoid it.
 
2014-07-20 11:58:32 AM  
"Every rose has a thorn."

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-20 12:19:07 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: What bacteria was it? How did it get there? What the hell?


Someone probably pooped on the bushes, and nobody cleaned it up until the bacteria spread with the bugs that walked through it.

Note: someONE, not someTHING. Urban animals don't naturally carry bacteria capable of necrotizing human flesh in sufficient quantities to have this effect, only humans do because we need it to process meat into the building blocks of human flesh. Turns out the same bacteria that do this for us aren't sapient life forms, don't die instantly when the poop comes out, and will happily break down human flesh as well whenever they make it past the skin and/or mucous membrane of the gastrointestinal tract. What's more, since the immune system generally gives them a pass (or else the bacteria wouldn't survive in our guts, and wouldn't be around to digest protein), so it's generally treatable only by amputation of the infected tissue.

/or it could be bad luck, the plant happened to have a different kind of necrotic disease, maybe something completely new
//but the odds are pretty far against that, in an urban environment
 
2014-07-20 12:37:35 PM  
Now this is a story that should resonate with most Farkers.  Who amongst us didn't read this and ponder the awful question, if I lost my right hand due to necrotizing fasciitis how would I ever be able to masturbate in mom's basement again?  Well, except for those left-handed Farkers out there, I guess.
 
2014-07-20 01:18:46 PM  

Tatterdemalian: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: What bacteria was it? How did it get there? What the hell?

Someone probably pooped on the bushes, and nobody cleaned it up until the bacteria spread with the bugs that walked through it.

Note: someONE, not someTHING. Urban animals don't naturally carry bacteria capable of necrotizing human flesh in sufficient quantities to have this effect, only humans do because we need it to process meat into the building blocks of human flesh. Turns out the same bacteria that do this for us aren't sapient life forms, don't die instantly when the poop comes out, and will happily break down human flesh as well whenever they make it past the skin and/or mucous membrane of the gastrointestinal tract. What's more, since the immune system generally gives them a pass (or else the bacteria wouldn't survive in our guts, and wouldn't be around to digest protein), so it's generally treatable only by amputation of the infected tissue.

/or it could be bad luck, the plant happened to have a different kind of necrotic disease, maybe something completely new
//but the odds are pretty far against that, in an urban environment


So, like if you stick it in her pooper your dick could fall off?
 
2014-07-20 01:23:04 PM  
fark you for making a Poison reference, Submitter. Life is too short to waste.
 
2014-07-20 01:24:43 PM  
Antibiotics had a pretty good run. We'll all be wearing rubber suits in a few years.
 
2014-07-20 01:35:42 PM  

uttertosh: okay, but which necrotizing fasciitis was it?

Details wot are interesting, are interesting, FFS!!


The video implies it was Streptococcus which is one of the usual suspects when it comes to this disease. It's possible that it came from his own body rather than the environment.
 
2014-07-20 02:54:21 PM  
Every rose has its thorn....


www.contactmusic.com

....but not every rose gives you flesh-eating bact-


www.thefablife.com
 
2014-07-20 02:54:52 PM  

Yankees Team Gynecologist: SacriliciousBeerSwiller: What bacteria was it? How did it get there? What the hell?

Nearly every MRSA story seems to start with an everyday surface wound that happens without incident to people all the time, sometimes not even a cut but just a bruise.

It must just come down to bad luck--either the bacteria exists in random spots and you can only hope you don't come in contact with any; or, it's all over but only sets in as infection on rare but random occasions. Doesn't seem like there's any way to avoid it.


Yup, a friend of my sister in law dropped a computer on her toe and after nearly a year in the hospital has no limbs. This shiat terrifies me.
 
2014-07-20 02:56:03 PM  
Roses don't have thorns. They have prickles.
/Damn you, QI!
 
2014-07-20 03:05:02 PM  

foo monkey: uttertosh: okay, but which necrotizing fasciitis was it?

Details wot are interesting, are interesting, FFS!!

Lol journalism, amirite?


did you just are being a dick to me? Not sure...

GermTheory: The video implies it was Streptococcus


Cool, thanks for that - I couldn't get the vid to work on my phone.

/MRSA 'survivor'
//6 weeks in hospital. 3 for the collapsed lung, 3 for the infection round the 'drainage' site.
///nice temperature- induced waking hallucinations.
 
2014-07-20 03:05:50 PM  

badhatharry: Antibiotics had a pretty good run. We'll all be wearing rubber suits in a few years.


Or re-learning proper hygiene.

/which starts with keeping your house clean
//instead of letting it get like something out of "Hoarders" and thinking there are no consequences as long as the junk doesn't pile up high enough to fall on you
///also, wash your farking hands after you take a piss
 
2014-07-20 03:22:33 PM  

Ed Grubermann: Roses don't have thorns. They have prickles.
/Damn you, QI!


Precisely where I learned this, too. Ridiculous how often I review every episode I can and find more and more... not uses exactly but something similar... for the random knowledge spouted there.
 
2014-07-20 06:10:03 PM  
There are worse things that you can get from roses; like Sporothrix schenckii. Sure, MRSA is bad, but I'd rather have that than a fungal infection that produces draining sinuses in whatever tissue it's taken up residence in.

\Don't GIS.
\\As long as vancomycin still works, I'm not too worried about GPC.
\\\Seriously though, we need some newer antibiotics or different ways to deal with bacteria.
 
2014-07-20 06:38:49 PM  

Landis: There are worse things that you can get from roses; like Sporothrix schenckii. Sure, MRSA is bad, but I'd rather have that than a fungal infection that produces draining sinuses in whatever tissue it's taken up residence in.

\Don't GIS.
\\As long as vancomycin still works, I'm not too worried about GPC.
\\\Seriously though, we need some newer antibiotics or different ways to deal with bacteria.


We have "different ways to deal with bacteria," it's called amputation and/or debridement. Antibiotics are simply a favored alternative, because they result in no disfigurement at all when successful, and the fact that we even discovered any at all was a happy accident that ushered in an era of medicine that is drawing to a close.

/naturally, more effort is being directed at finding someone to blame for the loss of this entitlement than in researching new antibiotics
//we'll probably end up blaming the Israelis, and trying to destroy them
///ironically after their medical research has discovered a way to revive plant species that have been extinct for 3000 years
 
2014-07-20 08:19:00 PM  

Tatterdemalian: Landis: There are worse things that you can get from roses; like Sporothrix schenckii. Sure, MRSA is bad, but I'd rather have that than a fungal infection that produces draining sinuses in whatever tissue it's taken up residence in.

\Don't GIS.
\\As long as vancomycin still works, I'm not too worried about GPC.
\\\Seriously though, we need some newer antibiotics or different ways to deal with bacteria.

We have "different ways to deal with bacteria," it's called amputation and/or debridement. Antibiotics are simply a favored alternative, because they result in no disfigurement at all when successful, and the fact that we even discovered any at all was a happy accident that ushered in an era of medicine that is drawing to a close.

/naturally, more effort is being directed at finding someone to blame for the loss of this entitlement than in researching new antibiotics
//we'll probably end up blaming the Israelis, and trying to destroy them
///ironically after their medical research has discovered a way to revive plant species that have been extinct for 3000 years


Yeah, no. Debridement is fine for superficial infections (assuming you can keep the new wound clean), but amputation is a little... drastic? barbaric, maybe? Yes, it's a method of last resort, but there are a lot of cases where they just aren't valid options, like occular infections, septicemia or gastrointestinal illness.

I was think more along the lines of developing ways to bolster the immune response itself or mechanically target pathogens instead of chemically doing so. But, as you correctly pointed out, people would rather whine about not being able to take amoxycillin for a cold than understand why that's a bad idea and help correct the problem.
 
2014-07-20 08:45:30 PM  
Well, he's a firefighter, so I guess he'll have plenty of practice learning to use his hose one-handed.
 
2014-07-20 09:05:47 PM  

Landis: There are worse things that you can get from roses; like Sporothrix schenckii. Sure, MRSA is bad, but I'd rather have that than a fungal infection that produces draining sinuses in whatever tissue it's taken up residence in.

\Don't GIS.
\\As long as vancomycin still works, I'm not too worried about GPC.
\\\Seriously though, we need some newer antibiotics or different ways to deal with bacteria.


I think I'd take my chances with Sporothrix. If you're immunocompetent the chance of getting anything much worse than a rash is relatively low. In fact, many people around the world are constantly exposed to it with little or no ill effects.
 
2014-07-20 10:35:53 PM  

Landis: Yeah, no. Debridement is fine for superficial infections (assuming you can keep the new wound clean), but amputation is a little... drastic? barbaric, maybe? Yes, it's a method of last resort, but there are a lot of cases where they just aren't valid options, like occular infections, septicemia or gastrointestinal illness.

I was think more along the lines of developing ways to bolster the immune response itself or mechanically target pathogens instead of chemically doing so. But, as you correctly pointed out, people would rather whine about not being able to take amoxycillin for a cold than understand why that's a bad idea and help correct the problem.


WTFamireading.jpg

/guess I shouldn't have expected much after the "different ways to deal with bacteria" post
//it's like listening to someone patiently explain how cavemen used to ride dinosaurs, "because most people think it was like The Flintstones, while the reality was different"
///there's just nowhere to even begin explaining to someone that thinks "mechanically targeting pathogens" isn't what debridement and amputation are... maybe you think it's not "mechanical" if we aren't using lasers or nanobots to remove infected tissue?
 
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