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(CBS Miami)   FL GOP to judge: So I know you said the districts we drew make a mockery of the democratic process and all, but it's gonna take us... say, two years to redraw them, so we're cool using them until then right?   (miami.cbslocal.com) divider line 48
    More: Unlikely, GOP, tags, Don Gaetz, League of Women Voters, Steve Weatherford, congressional districts, absentee ballots, Common Cause  
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4010 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Jul 2014 at 3:48 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-07-19 03:56:38 PM  
12 votes:
There's a computer program now that can draw them in a few seconds, once the data is entered.  And it will be unbiased.  This should be required for all states.
2014-07-19 02:07:17 PM  
9 votes:
So, the court found that the GOP-dominated legislature rigged the map for partisan advantage in violation of both state and federal laws, and they now want to say "well, there's no other map we can use in time...."

I have a modest proposal. Allow the map to continue to be used going forward for this election if they cannot be revised -- but as a matter of equity, with no legislator who voted in favor of the unlawful maps being eligible for state legislative office in any election using the existing maps, to at least insure they may not themselves benefit from their own impropriety.

Florida's constitution does not appear to have a "speech and debate" privilege for their legislature, and Ballotpedia indicates an amendment to give such privelege was voted down during the Reagan years.
2014-07-19 03:17:22 PM  
8 votes:
I used to think the people that said the GOP is the greatest threat democracy were just being hyperbolic. Used to.
2014-07-19 10:45:26 PM  
6 votes:

Doc Daneeka: The gerrymandering is a travesty, yes, but this is what they get for sending a GOP majority to the statehouse in the first place.  What did they think was going to happen?

Maybe next time Florida voters will have more sense.


Last election, I helped a lot of my friends register, but I warned them to register either Independent or Republican. Some did, but most registered Dem. Incidentally, all of my friends who were registered I or R had no problems voting on election day, but three of my friends who registered D had trouble. Two were turned away. My roommate, for example, never receive his voter registration card, and was denied - flat out denied by the woman working there - a provisional ballot at the polling station. As he had never voted in any previous election, and was kind of annoyed at having waited like 3 or 4 hours in line, he did not know or did not care that was wrong and went home without having voted. I, a registered Republican (because someone with some sense should vote in the Republican primaries here), had absolutely no problems come election day (still voted Dem on election day, though). My roommate received his voter's registration card 3 months after the election. The incident infuriated myself and a lot of my friends, even our staunch conservative Republican friend, that we couldn't help but laugh at the absurdity of the situation, and to vent we wrote in "[Roommate's name]'s voter registration" as one of the blank card in Cards Against Humanity. It tends to be a trump card if he's judging certain cards like "Why can't I sleep at night?" Similarly, a friend of mine, who also registered Dem and had never voted before, was denied a ballot at her polling station and told to go home or else they would call the police on her trying to vote illegally. She was 18 at the time, that scared her, and off she went to avoid a run in with police. Sadly, neither of them could be assed to care enough to pursue the matter in any legal capacity, which I can kind of understand (both working full-time, both are full-time students, both broke) but at the same time... *sigh* c'est la vie.

So, some of it, sure, has to do with Florida voters being asshats. Some of it, however, may have to do with bullsh*t tactics by Republicans to prevent registered Democrats from voting in elections. This year, my roommate changed his party affiliation and, lo and behold, we both received our voter cards on the same day a few weeks ago. Not sure about my other friends, but some of them seem less enthusiastic about mid-terms; a position I'm trying desperately to reverse.

In fact, given the sheer volume and diversity of tactics pushed by Republicans over the last several years to try and prevent certain groups of people, who typically vote for Democrats, from voting, I am surprised at the number of people who assume Republican governors or Republican-controlled state legislatures are fairly voted in. I'd put good money on that being true less than half the time.
2014-07-19 07:44:03 PM  
5 votes:

officeday: mrshowrules: Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.

Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....


Yeah ..cry me a river.  The last congressional race  Democratic votes exceed Republican votes by more than half a million.
And yet the GOP has a huge advantage 234 to 201.  Sounds fair to me?
2014-07-19 06:56:38 PM  
5 votes:

mod_reright: lilbjorn: There's a computer program now that can draw them in a few seconds, once the data is entered.  And it will be unbiased.  This should be required for all states.

No, it shouldn't.  It should be part of the process, maybe, but there should also be human input.  Such a system can disenfranchise groups of people.  There are non-gerrymandering reasons for redistricting.


I believe the way to do it is make all Representatives elected from the state's population at large. For instance, Florida has 27 Representatives. On election day, everyone votes for the candidate they think represents them the best, and you take the top 27 vote-getters. In this manner, ANY group of people that can churn up enough support for their cause gets a representative in Congress. Whether that's the teachers' union, the corporate bigwigs, the factory workers, the fast-food workers, even the unemployed people can get their own rep if there's enough of them.

This would solve several problems at once, not the least of which is gerrymandering. It also enables any minority group with vested interests to have a pretty good shot at getting their own rep regardless of the proximity of their homes. Sure, candidates have to have a statewide campaign, but that's not as bad as what you might think - most people are going to vote for someone relating to their job, their church, or a particular issue they feel strongly about, so they'd likely find out easily which candidate best fits their interests. Racial minorities making only single-digit percentages of the population could easily get representation in this manner.

The candidates are supposed to represent the people. Back in the olden days they were chosen to represent people on a geographical basis for practical reasons, most of which don't apply anymore. The atheist stockbroker who lives in a million dollar mansion probably doesn't have the same interests as the christian factory worker who lives in a trailer park a few miles away, and neither have much in common with the immigrant store owner that sells them their coffee each morning - but they're all supposedly represented by the same person. This needs to change.
2014-07-19 10:51:54 PM  
4 votes:
CSB*: My father was a returning officer in the last Alberta election. They're hired by the government, not a party, and their job is simply to get a census of eligible voters in their assigned region and break it up into voting districts with a reasonably equal distribution of people. The work is overseen/checked/whatever by some kind of independent government committee in case they try to bias the result.

Why on earth would you let the party in charge draw the districts themselves? What person, at any point, ever thought that was a good idea? Might as well let my dog decide which shelf to keep the peanut butter and whether or not to leave the cupboard open.

*well, as C as a CSB can be in the Politics tab...
2014-07-19 06:50:24 PM  
4 votes:
The purpose of a Republican form of government is to best reflect the will of the governed, so as to ensure their consent to be governed is maintained.  This type of gerrymandering is anathema to that purpose.  Republicans are against the Republican form of government.
2014-07-19 05:04:51 PM  
4 votes:

Destructor: Ok, enough of this.

Here's what you do. Anyone can run for Congress. The people that receive the most votes win. They're representatives for all of Florida.

However, the losers? They're summarily hunted for sport in the everglades (license fees to hunt them go to the Florida education fund). Why? To discourage non-serious candidates.

/Problem solved.


Given that it's the winners that write these laws, your idea would solve literally nothing.

Here's a better one. Anyone can run for election. Unlimited spending, unlimited airtime, no ballot access laws. However there's a "none of the above" option on the ballot. If that option wins over 1% of the vote, all the candidates are thrown to the alligators, and the new rep is picked at random from everyone who voted "none of the above."
2014-07-19 03:54:49 PM  
4 votes:

sendtodave: Peter von Nostrand: I used to think the people that said the GOP is the greatest threat democracy were just being hyperbolic. Used to.

Democracy is for stupid little people.


Hey, tell us the one about how we're a republic, not a democracy! That's always good for a diversion!
2014-07-20 01:35:22 AM  
3 votes:
Similarly, a friend of mine, who also registered Dem and had never voted before, was denied a ballot at her polling station and told to go home or else they would call the police on her trying to vote illegally

And that's where kitty gets stabby.

Now let's rephrase this:

Similarly, a friend of mine, who also registered GOP and had never voted before, was denied a ballot at her polling station and told to go home or else they would call the police on her trying to vote illegally

And kitty gets stabby again.

Don't ever EVER f*ck with people when they want to goddamn vote, I don't give a fart in the Sahara if they're a member of the American Communist Party or they're voting for Richard Sh*t Nixon as a write in.
MFK
2014-07-19 10:44:45 PM  
3 votes:

officeday: mrshowrules: Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.

Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....


Yeah yeah... Maryland and Illinois are gerrymandered blue states. Let's be sure to put those two states against the 30 gerrymandered red states to show how both sides are exactly the same.
2014-07-19 09:13:07 PM  
3 votes:

Trapped: Remember kids, it's only wrong when Republicans do it.


If you can project all your personal failings on to "those others" then you never have to face the reality that you personally may be an awful person.

To put a finer point on it: Not everyone thinks that something is wrong by the very fact that it is done by some group of people. It is possible that it is wrong if any group of people do it.

So, would you be prepared to say this is unequivocally wrong and the Republicans who did this are unamerican and hurt our democracy?
2014-07-19 04:47:55 PM  
3 votes:

lilbjorn: There's a computer program now that can draw them in a few seconds, once the data is entered.  And it will be unbiased.  This should be required for all states.


If I ran the world computers would be charged with drawing all possible maps that create districts that are as compact as possible. Then a special grand jury of 100 citizens from across the state would be randomly selected sequestered and given all the variant maps to vote on wioth no toher information furnished
2014-07-19 04:40:04 PM  
3 votes:
Outsource it to Canada. They seem to know how to come up with electoral districts that don't look like a Rorschach Test.

img.fark.net
2014-07-20 03:02:08 AM  
2 votes:

IamKaiserSoze!!!: Like gerrymandering is a partisan issue. Both sides indulge in this when they're in power. It would be very simple to come up with a model that divides voting districts on a very objective basis, but neither party would ever go for it as too many of their seats would be put in jeopardy.

Wait though, this is the Fark Political tab, so Republitards bad and Dems have never done this.


No, you're correct. Dems have done it a few times.
Which is like saying jaywalking and drunk driving can cause lethal vehicular accidents.
2014-07-20 01:11:12 AM  
2 votes:

IamKaiserSoze!!!: Like gerrymandering is a partisan issue. Both sides indulge in this when they're in power. It would be very simple to come up with a model that divides voting districts on a very objective basis, but neither party would ever go for it as too many of their seats would be put in jeopardy.

Wait though, this is the Fark Political tab, so Republitards bad and Dems have never done this.


Ah the old saw, "both sides are bad - so vote Republican".

Sorry buddy, but I prefer a no rape/no hate platform.
2014-07-19 10:25:31 PM  
2 votes:

officeday: mrshowrules: Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.

Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....


I may be new to this game, but isn't this a strawman argument?
2014-07-19 09:16:22 PM  
2 votes:

GentDirkly: I like the cut of you jib, but I do think there is an idea l number for it. Something more than 5, but probably less than 10. 27 is not that number. The first time that the system was used, a handful of people would be so popular statewide that they may have 10x as many votes as the 27th place candidate, who would equally get a seat. These very popular candidates would have to find ways to focus their efforts and spread their popularity to others that agree with them. It would be messy. Finally, you're giving the voter a very long ballot with over 50 names on it and asking them to choose one. It may be difficult for voters to find the candidate they want. It may be difficult for them to feel secure in their decision. This is the reason your grocer stocks 3 brands of pasta, not 20.


The grocer only stocks three brands because he has limited shelf space. The ballots can be as big as necessary; people will be more likely to know ahead of time who they're voting for once they get used to it. But if you feel it's a valid issue, split some of the bigger states like Florida, Texas, New York, and California into districts with 10 or so Representatives.

I currently reside in TN, where there are 9 representatives. In 2012, Mitt Romney got 59% of the vote to Barack Obama's 39%. You would think that an accurate representation of the population would be 3 Dem, 6 Republican, or 4 Dem, 5 Republican. Instead there are 2 Democrats and 7 Republicans, and it's not even gerrymandered that badly. 9 Representatives would be optimal in my opinion; the ballot would likely have about 20-25 names of people who could get enough signatures.

I think what you brought up about very popular Representatives getting huge numbers of votes is actually a good thing, not a bad thing. People will feel confident that that person will win again and instead vote for someone like them in order to get double the representation. Large organizations that currently wield tremendous political power will have to decide if they wish to run two candidates instead of one, and risk neither being elected as people look to a candidate that better represents their individual interests rather than the aggregate political goals of the organization.

The other upside is that political parties will have less control over the political process. Coalitions must form in order to accomplish major legislation or even elect a Speaker. The Tea Party can split off from the Republican Party, which will make both far happier, yet marginalized. Dems can remain a centrist party, while the real liberals can branch off and form their own organization. Swing voters will still be more likely to swing towards the tallest guy or the one with the biggest billboard, but the real politically active people will be less likely to "settle" for someone. Voter participation will likely increase because it will take so few votes to put the 9th-place candidate into office - and that person will know they barely skimmed by and they will be far more likely to respond to the people that elected them.
2014-07-19 08:43:44 PM  
2 votes:

ghare: officeday: mrshowrules: Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.

Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....

Ohhh, did baby leave his echo chamber for a minute ?

/pssssttt...Fark isn't liberal. Unless you think facts and accuracy are liberal.


According to Faux News, facts and accuracy *are* liberal, haven't you been paying attention to the soulless minions of evil at Faux News these past few years? I know that they have been spewing forth all manner of falsehoods and distorions, but one *must* pay attention to them, otherwise one will not know what the talking points of the forces of darkness are this hour.
2014-07-19 08:37:39 PM  
2 votes:

officeday: mrshowrules: Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.

Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....


Ohhh, did baby leave his echo chamber for a minute ?

/pssssttt...Fark isn't liberal. Unless you think facts and accuracy are liberal.
2014-07-19 05:33:26 PM  
2 votes:
Gerrymandering takes a long time.  A fair redistricting takes no time at all.  You could fairly redistrict a State in about an hour using the shortest split linealgorithm.
2014-07-19 04:06:39 PM  
2 votes:

Destructor: Ok, enough of this.

Here's what you do. Anyone can run for Congress. The people that receive the most votes win. They're representatives for all of Florida.

However, the losers? They're summarily hunted for sport in the everglades (license fees to hunt them go to the Florida education fund). Why? To discourage non-serious candidates.

/Problem solved.


As much as I hate politicians and our goofy system- you may have watched a few too many dystopian movies lately

How about when you are elected you turn over 75% of your wealth (including real property) and once your term in office is done you can never mention politics or your role in govt (no books no movies no interviews) on get your wealth and property back in 10% segments annually after another year of STFU
2014-07-19 03:58:46 PM  
2 votes:

Doc Daneeka: The gerrymandering is a travesty, yes, but this is what they get for sending a GOP majority to the statehouse in the first place.  What did they think was going to happen?

Maybe next time Florida voters will have more sense.


Bwahahahahahahahahahahaha!
2014-07-20 12:11:49 PM  
1 votes:

MFK: That would work in smaller states but in states like Texas and California it is ridiculous to expect one person to cover a land mass of that size.

Districts are supposed to be based on population and geography. Take all political data out of the districting process and problem is solved


Why?

In this day and age of cell phones, email, automobiles, and jets, why does geographical representation make more sense than representation by occupation, trade, or career? Why not marital status? Why not religious belief? Why not intelligence? Why not income level? Why not sexual preference? Does a guy living in Galveston likely have more in common with someone living in San Antonio or someone living in Myrtle Beach, SC? Does a person living in Austin have more in common with someone from Laredo or someone from Denver, CO?

I know they're "supposed to be" based on geography, but that was a couple of hundred years ago when basing representation on geography made sense. With all communication taking days, it made elections and communication with one's constituents possible. It was a constraint of level of technology that is simply no longer applicable. We've progressed a lot since then.

But as I said earlier, if you really think it's necessary, you can chop the bigger states into districts of about 10 reps each.
2014-07-20 08:06:58 AM  
1 votes:

MFK: Are you farking serious? Is this common knowledge in Florida??


That elections in Florida are fishy? Pretty sure that's been common knowledge across the United States since late-2000.
2014-07-20 04:29:17 AM  
1 votes:

heap: in some respects, I get that, but in others...I just really don't give a shiat anymore.

I've lived in the rural-est of rural, I've lived in urban centers, and now I live in surburbia...and in every instance, no matter how you atomize the situation, there was always competing interest present.

in other words, within any geographical designation, you can arbitrarily place a line and say 'people on this side are different from the ones on the other' - be it a state, a county, or a township.


Well, I've lived a bit in the rural realms, but most of my life has been in the city. I do, however, have shirttail relatives still on the farm and their crying about how we city folk don't understand their problems and (I guess) we don't appreciate the tremendous sacrifices they make to ensure we have chicken, milk, and hops for beer.

All that being said, I too, weary of all the whining.
2014-07-20 03:57:35 AM  
1 votes:

HammerHeadSnark: Great idea, but I'm not sure how it'd work in my state (Washington). A mountain range pretty much divides it into two domains. The eastern portion is twice the size of the western portion in area, but has only one-third the population. The Seattle side (the west side) would have enough of a population advantage to elect all the representatives . . . leaving the east side being taxed without representation. (Wasn't there a war about that once?)

I believe you (like me) are a city person, but you haven't taken into account the sparsely populated agricultural areas that most states have. Their needs and wants rarely coincide with the wants and needs of us city slickers.


I'm normally a city person, but I'm definitely living in a rural area at the moment. However, that doesn't matter in this thought experiment.

Situations like Washington State are exactly what my idea would address - ANY subset of the population can have a Representative - and the people will divide themselves the most efficient way possible. Right now, we depend on geographical division, but there is simply no practical reason why the division cannot be according to one's occupation, one's religious beliefs (or lack thereof), or one's desire for a specific piece of legislation.

Washington state has 10 Reps. While I'm sure that there is some overlap of interests, under the system I have in mind the Eastern half (with 1/3 of the population) has every bit of the ability to elect a Rep as half of the Western half. You vote for whatever Rep best represents your interests, instead of voting for whichever of your two choices that you feel is less evil. Keep the same qualifying petitions, and you'll likely only have about 25 people on the ballot. You could do like India and let each candidate choose a symbol and put those symbols on the ballot next to each candidate's name if you wanted it simpler.

For example, if one person wants to sell themselves as a Tea Party type, they can get votes from the huge numbers of Conservatives in the Eastern half, and might even pick up a few from the Western half. That's the whole idea - if all of the candidates are campaigning only in the Western half of the state, they're missing out on 1/3 of the votes, making it easy for a candidate to pick up a seat by campaigning in the Eastern half. With 10 winners in the election, you at most need 10% of the whole vote to be guaranteed a seat, but the 10th place candidate will likely be closer to 2 or 3 percent or even lower.

In this way, the Western half simply cannot choose all of the candidates. The Eastern half, with 34% of the population, has more than enough votes to get at least 3, if not 4 reps. And those reps won't be representing an area, they'll be representing only their voters - far better than the system we have in place now where a candidate is almost invariably representing hundreds of thousands of people who preferred someone else's platform.

With this system, you would likely wind up with less than 5% of the population who did not vote for their Representative. Compare that to the current situation when it is normal for 45% or more people in a district to be represented by someone they did not vote for and you'll see the advantages.
2014-07-20 03:34:24 AM  
1 votes:

HammerHeadSnark: I believe you (like me) are a city person, but you haven't taken into account the sparsely populated agricultural areas that most states have. Their needs and wants rarely coincide with the wants and needs of us city slickers.


in some respects, I get that, but in others...I just really don't give a shiat anymore.

I've lived in the rural-est of rural, I've lived in urban centers, and now I live in surburbia...and in every instance, no matter how you atomize the situation, there was always competing interest present.

in other words, within any geographical designation, you can arbitrarily place a line and say 'people on this side are different from the ones on the other' - be it a state, a county, or a township.
2014-07-20 12:17:28 AM  
1 votes:

officeday: Democrats would fight that tooth and nail. Gerrymandering is not isolated to Repubs, it occurs whenever and wherever there is a lack of a serious opposing party. Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....


I'm a liberal in rural Indiana. I'm apathetic about guns, I'm not Christian, I don't sympathize with farmers, and I think social issues are a giant waste of time.

If you want to play "woe is me", I can play that too.
2014-07-20 12:07:30 AM  
1 votes:

jaytkay: fatassbastard: This should be required for all states.

US law leaves the details of voting to states.

You will be shocked, shocked to hear that conservatives in pro-secession and pro-slavery states work very hard to disenfranchise black voters.


Can we stop pretending states' rights still matter as much as they did back in the 18th or 19th centuries? Back then, traveling cross-country took weeks or months. Today, it's a matter of hours or days.
2014-07-20 12:05:49 AM  
1 votes:

fatassbastard: This should be required for all states.


US law leaves the details of voting to states.

You will be shocked, shocked to hear that conservatives in pro-secession and pro-slavery states work very hard to disenfranchise black voters.
2014-07-19 11:48:03 PM  
1 votes:
America needs an army of soldiers to guard against enemies foreign, and an army of Sam Vimeses to defend against enemies domestic.
2014-07-19 08:52:26 PM  
1 votes:
Use the map previous to the one the GOP submitted.
2014-07-19 08:28:24 PM  
1 votes:
That it took 2 years for a judge to decide that the 2012 Florida GOP redistricting plan was in violation of the law is a bigger shame than the plan itself (which is a farce, in and of itself).
2014-07-19 08:26:20 PM  
1 votes:
officeday: Believe me, as a repub in MD, the Dems have been pulling this shiat for decades....But since this is FARK, I'm sure you're fine with that....

Absolutely.

After the shiat your party has pulled on everyone around the entire world in the past 14 years...
2014-07-19 07:58:49 PM  
1 votes:

The Name: sendtodave: You know what would solve all of this?

Philosopher kings.

In all seriousness, some states would probably actually fare better if they were run by a benevolent-enough dictator.  Recent history has shown us that some places (I'm looking at you, Kansas, Florida and North Carolina) are on average just too stupid to make decisions for themselves through the democratic process.


Everything runs better under a benevolent dictator.

Pretty tough finding one and keeping them that way.
2014-07-19 06:50:34 PM  
1 votes:

lilbjorn: There's a computer program now that can draw them in a few seconds, once the data is entered.  And it will be unbiased.  This should be required for all states.


You would never see a more vicious, dirty, back-room-dealing, underhanded, downright nasty fight from Congress, than them trying to prevent a national mandate for such a thing. I honestly think it would come down to reps barring themselves, armed, in their respective Capitals.
2014-07-19 06:40:30 PM  
1 votes:
Wahh!  Redraw the lines- it's the only way we stand a chance!  (take your choice.)
2014-07-19 06:32:04 PM  
1 votes:

EngineerAU: Outsource it to Canada. They seem to know how to come up with electoral districts that don't look like a Rorschach Test.

[img.fark.net image 800x567]


Why does the False Creek district get that little wedge of water that extends so far out into the inlet? Are there houseboats out there or something? Are they gerrymandering the waterfowl who are demanding equal representation despite claiming exemption from taxes?

But yeah, that's waaaay better than what you usually see in the US.
2014-07-19 05:18:29 PM  
1 votes:

lilbjorn: There's a computer program now that can draw them in a few seconds, once the data is entered.  And it will be unbiased.  This should be required for all states.


Won't work. When all is said and done Diebold or Xe would get the contract and it'd be as bad or worse than it is now.
2014-07-19 04:59:08 PM  
1 votes:
Are they suggesting that our troops are too stupid to understand why they could get a second ballot?  Troops that are from Florida, and that should know that Florida is the worst state as far as running elections goes?

We really need to switch to an algorithmic districting scheme.  A system that discriminates against minorities by coincidence sounds bad, but it's much better than a few states having a "token" minority candidate.
2014-07-19 04:35:59 PM  
1 votes:

sendtodave: You know what would solve all of this?

Philosopher kings.


In all seriousness, some states would probably actually fare better if they were run by a benevolent-enough dictator.  Recent history has shown us that some places (I'm looking at you, Kansas, Florida and North Carolina) are on average just too stupid to make decisions for themselves through the democratic process.
2014-07-19 04:18:26 PM  
1 votes:
But Voter ID must still be enacted before the election to ensure faith in the process, amirite? People can totes get them by then.
2014-07-19 04:10:40 PM  
1 votes:

Doc Daneeka: The gerrymandering is a travesty, yes, but this is what they get for sending a GOP majority to the statehouse in the first place.  What did they think was going to happen?

Maybe next time Florida voters will have more sense.


warosu.org
2014-07-19 04:08:57 PM  
1 votes:
You know what would solve all of this?

Philosopher kings.
2014-07-19 03:57:29 PM  
1 votes:
Ok, enough of this.

Here's what you do. Anyone can run for Congress. The people that receive the most votes win. They're representatives for all of Florida.

However, the losers? They're summarily hunted for sport in the everglades (license fees to hunt them go to the Florida education fund). Why? To discourage non-serious candidates.

/Problem solved.
2014-07-19 03:55:56 PM  
1 votes:
The gerrymandering is a travesty, yes, but this is what they get for sending a GOP majority to the statehouse in the first place.  What did they think was going to happen?

Maybe next time Florida voters will have more sense.
 
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