Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNBC)   Old & busted: Craft beer. New hotness: Craft coffee   (cnbc.com) divider line 73
    More: Spiffy  
•       •       •

2355 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jul 2014 at 5:17 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



73 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-07-19 01:47:27 PM  
img.21food.com

New hotness?

Ummm...hasn't this been around for quite some time now?
 
2014-07-19 03:04:42 PM  
If by new hotness subby means every time you brew a cup?

I will pay more for good coffee.
 
2014-07-19 04:34:58 PM  
I think craft beer makes more money because you can drink a whole lot of beer, but you can only drink so much coffee before you feel like you have malaria.
 
2014-07-19 04:42:48 PM  
Addendum:
I always drink good coffee black because any other way reminds me of what I overheard at a restaurant years ago when some guy requested some sugar for his wine.

If I'm going to pay a premium price for coffee, I'd like to taste it, and savor it.
If I want ice cream, I'll just buy some ice cream.
 
2014-07-19 05:20:09 PM  

TommyymmoT: Addendum:
I always drink good coffee black because any other way reminds me of what I overheard at a restaurant years ago when some guy requested some sugar for his wine.

If I'm going to pay a premium price for coffee, I'd like to taste it, and savor it.
If I want ice cream, I'll just buy some ice cream.


When Bonnie buys the coffee, she buys shiat.
 
2014-07-19 05:21:59 PM  
Welcome to Portland.  Don't feed the hipsters, please.
 
2014-07-19 05:25:09 PM  
I'm okay with this. Question to you farkers? Anyone here ever try Civet coffee? Anyone brave enough to try. I know what it is, but I'm still thinking about it.
 
2014-07-19 05:26:51 PM  
Bah!   I've been roasting my own coffee for years, primarily Kona from a couple of producers I've had long relationships with.
 
2014-07-19 05:31:30 PM  
Jean Luc!!!
 
2014-07-19 05:32:13 PM  
 
2014-07-19 05:33:44 PM  
So "artisanal" = "flavored" ?
EW
 
2014-07-19 05:38:42 PM  
I've been using a countertop roaster similar to this for awhile:

0.tqn.com

I pay about $10/lb for green coffee beans on Amazon.  I could buy a huge sack, if I were so inclined, as green coffee beans have a lot longer shelf life than preroasted.

Not a coffee snob either, I just like DIY and a copper roaster just wouldn't be feasible.
 
2014-07-19 05:40:33 PM  

slotz: So "artisanal" = "flavored" ?
EW


Or, in the case of Kopi Luwak, "artisanal" = "cat's anal".

I don't often drink coffee but, when I do, I prefer it to taste like coffee and not an explosion of berries and rare herbs.
 
2014-07-19 05:40:47 PM  
Article short of details. Summing up, let's go to Ollie. Ollie?  coffee getting more expensive!
 
2014-07-19 05:42:59 PM  
I drink shade-grown coffee from farms with community-friendly operations.

You do not?

Ewwww!
 
2014-07-19 05:44:04 PM  

Alphakronik: Welcome to Portland.  Don't feed the hipsters, please.


Welcome to Seattle, eight years ago.
 
2014-07-19 05:48:58 PM  
Once you add Bailey's - it's all good.
 
2014-07-19 05:50:11 PM  
Anything is probably better than Kraft Coffee.
 
2014-07-19 05:51:06 PM  

Makh: Anything is probably better than Kraft Coffee.


Does it come in an aerosol can?
 
2014-07-19 05:57:35 PM  
You know what would make that coffee better? More hops!
 
2014-07-19 05:57:58 PM  
just stop
 
2014-07-19 06:02:03 PM  

baconbeard: You know what would make that coffee better? More hops!


Bicycle delivered fair trade hop infused beans, roasted daily.
 
2014-07-19 06:05:43 PM  

rnatalie: Bah!   I've been roasting my own coffee for years, primarily Kona from a couple of producers I've had long relationships with.


As much as I like Kona coffee, I still think it really tastes best on the island itself. All that extra ambiance works in a psychosomatic bliss.
 
2014-07-19 06:11:44 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-19 06:15:32 PM  

Alphakronik: Welcome to Portland.  Don't feed the hipsters, please.


Keep Portland Weird
 
2014-07-19 06:15:57 PM  
So, independent coffee is pretty much like it was before Starbucks slipped the bounds of Seattle?
 
2014-07-19 06:17:22 PM  

ultraholland: Jean Luc!!!


I LOL'd
 
2014-07-19 06:21:59 PM  
I only drink fair trade, shade grown beans picked hand delivered by 7 year old slave girls, who have only ever eaten honey, in one pound bags to a local roastery where alabaster skinned naked virgins carefully roast each bean individually in specially made copper spoons. Each bean is then perfectly ground in a teeny tiny burr grinder by turning the handle exactly 34 times. The bean is then delivered to an aeropress by said virgins. It is a complex process that yields the best coffee you've ever had. Where does this all happen you ask? It's a pretty obscure place, I'm sure you've never heard of it.
 
2014-07-19 06:23:06 PM  
www.dumpaday.com
 
2014-07-19 06:23:22 PM  

Prey4reign: slotz: So "artisanal" = "flavored" ?
EW

Or, in the case of Kopi Luwak, "artisanal" = "cat's anal".

I don't often drink coffee but, when I do, I prefer it to taste like coffee and not an explosion of berries and rare herbs.


I havent read the article yet, but it's Fark, it's a given.

In any case, Ive been working in the craft beer biz for fourteen years. I like my beer to be consistant with good, clean, flavors. I actually perferthe term small brewer over craft, and craft over "artisional"

to me... the word "artisinal" shifts the burdon of the products quality onto the end consumer and away from the producer. the stuff could taste like absolute shiat, and you'll have folks choking it down because of how intense, intriguing, and unique it is because its artisional, and ifsome one dares spit it out because it tastes like shiat, they'll be looked down on for not having the capacity and refined tastes to understand the producers vision and intent.

as for coffee? indie roasters have been around for a long time, at least as long as the craft beer movement, if not longer. I dont drink as much coffee anymore because of my heart, but I do seek out the local roasters as well as the local brewers when I travel.
 
2014-07-19 06:25:23 PM  
The only new thing is calling it "craft" coffee. Retailers have been selling their own blends for decades, complete with flavor descriptions.
 
2014-07-19 06:25:23 PM  

tripleseven: TommyymmoT: Addendum:
I always drink good coffee black because any other way reminds me of what I overheard at a restaurant years ago when some guy requested some sugar for his wine.

If I'm going to pay a premium price for coffee, I'd like to taste it, and savor it.
If I want ice cream, I'll just buy some ice cream.

When Bonnie buys the coffee, she buys shiat.


Yeah, but who cares about that.  Tell me about the soup!
 
2014-07-19 06:27:13 PM  
img.fark.net

approve
 
2014-07-19 06:28:42 PM  

abhorrent1: just stop


Maybe it can come in bacon and sriracha flavors.
 
2014-07-19 06:29:56 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: Prey4reign: slotz: So "artisanal" = "flavored" ?
EW

Or, in the case of Kopi Luwak, "artisanal" = "cat's anal".

I don't often drink coffee but, when I do, I prefer it to taste like coffee and not an explosion of berries and rare herbs.

I havent read the article yet, but it's Fark, it's a given.

In any case, Ive been working in the craft beer biz for fourteen years. I like my beer to be consistant with good, clean, flavors. I actually perferthe term small brewer over craft, and craft over "artisional"

to me... the word "artisinal" shifts the burdon of the products quality onto the end consumer and away from the producer. the stuff could taste like absolute shiat, and you'll have folks choking it down because of how intense, intriguing, and unique it is because its artisional, and ifsome one dares spit it out because it tastes like shiat, they'll be looked down on for not having the capacity and refined tastes to understand the producers vision and intent.

as for coffee? indie roasters have been around for a long time, at least as long as the craft beer movement, if not longer. I dont drink as much coffee anymore because of my heart, but I do seek out the local roasters as well as the local brewers when I travel.


"bespoke" is where it's at .
 
2014-07-19 06:30:04 PM  

wademh: rnatalie: Bah!   I've been roasting my own coffee for years, primarily Kona from a couple of producers I've had long relationships with.

As much as I like Kona coffee, I still think it really tastes best on the island itself. All that extra ambiance works in a psychosomatic bliss.


Like Ting soda!
 
2014-07-19 06:32:45 PM  

monkey_licker: I only drink fair trade, shade grown beans picked hand delivered by 7 year old slave girls, who have only ever eaten honey, in one pound bags to a local roastery where alabaster skinned naked virgins carefully roast each bean individually in specially made copper spoons. Each bean is then perfectly ground in a teeny tiny burr grinder by turning the handle exactly 34 times. The bean is then delivered to an aeropress by said virgins. It is a complex process that yields the best coffee you've ever had. Where does this all happen you ask? It's a pretty obscure place, I'm sure you've never heard of it.


You only make them turn the handle 34 times? Why don't you just serve Maxwell House, ya farkin poser.
 
2014-07-19 06:35:14 PM  

ebenbane: baconbeard: You know what would make that coffee better? More hops!

Bicycle delivered fair trade hop infused beans, roasted daily.


Maybe an in-house milk cow and you add fresh milk from the udder?  Or you take the milk and separate the creme fresh and add just a touch of paprika and sugar to your cup.
 
2014-07-19 06:41:45 PM  

TommyymmoT: Addendum:
I always drink good coffee black because any other way reminds me of what I overheard at a restaurant years ago when some guy requested some sugar for his wine.

If I'm going to pay a premium price for coffee, I'd like to taste it, and savor it.
If I want ice cream, I'll just buy some ice cream.


Yep . I like my coffee to be coffee flavored .
 
2014-07-19 06:45:33 PM  
I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.
 
2014-07-19 06:51:21 PM  

CruJones: I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.


Exactly.
 
2014-07-19 06:55:35 PM  

TommyymmoT: Addendum:
I always drink good coffee black because any other way reminds me of what I overheard at a restaurant years ago when some guy requested some sugar for his wine.

If I'm going to pay a premium price for coffee, I'd like to taste it, and savor it.
If I want ice cream, I'll just buy some ice cream.


Right.

With lightly roasted coffee you get the natural flavor of the beans. Expensive beans have a good and unique flavor. Cheap beans taste like crap.

When you dark roast beans the taste is derived from the roasting process.

Everyone from Starbucks to 7-11 buys cheap beans and roasts the crap out of them to the point that they can taste burnt, which is why people put milk and sugar in the coffee to mask the bad taste.
 
2014-07-19 07:03:51 PM  

ghare: CruJones: I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.

Exactly.


That's just like beer. The only bad beer is no beer. And Corona.
 
2014-07-19 07:06:28 PM  

ghare: CruJones: I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.

Exactly.


yep, whenever I am asked what I think is the best beer in the world, or.. my favorite? the stock reply is:

"the one in my hand"

I no longer let shiatty coffee dictate my mood for the rest of the day. though I do demand at least decent coffee. and have been considering the repurposed hot air popcorn popper method of home roasting..
 
2014-07-19 07:11:39 PM  
Comparing the growing high-end coffee scene to craft beer isn't really accurate.

It's so easy and cheap to produce bottle beer (and many kinds of hard liquor) that the market is becoming increasingly flooded with "craft" beers from people that have no clue what they're doing -- a lot of the stuff tastes like crap.

With coffee, you need a good amount of capital to gain access to quality beans, and the sources of beans change year to year. Last year NPR did a great story how roasters like Stumptown have buyers constantly traveling the world looking for beans.

Or to put this another way, making a quality craft beer is largely about having a good sense of taste and understanding the brewing process. The ingredients are easy to access and buy. Coffee is about the beans. Everyone is using the same roasting equipment and technique.

Now one last element with coffee is of course the brewing method, which can wildly vary. Only espresso takes a lot of technique with a big learning curve. If you own a good burr grinder and can follow directions, anyone is capable of making a great cup of coffee without much difficulty using.
 
2014-07-19 07:19:40 PM  

baconbeard: ghare: CruJones: I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.

Exactly.

That's just like beer. The only bad beer is no beer. And Corona.


Corona and XX are about the only beers I can drink, and I have to be by a pool or on the beach.
 
2014-07-19 07:23:42 PM  

thornhill: Comparing the growing high-end coffee scene to craft beer isn't really accurate.

It's so easy and cheap to produce bottle beer (and many kinds of hard liquor) that the market is becoming increasingly flooded with "craft" beers from people that have no clue what they're doing -- a lot of the stuff tastes like crap.

With coffee, you need a good amount of capital to gain access to quality beans, and the sources of beans change year to year. Last year NPR did a great story how roasters like Stumptown have buyers constantly traveling the world looking for beans.

Or to put this another way, making a quality craft beer is largely about having a good sense of taste and understanding the brewing process. The ingredients are easy to access and buy. Coffee is about the beans. Everyone is using the same roasting equipment and technique.

Now one last element with coffee is of course the brewing method, which can wildly vary. Only espresso takes a lot of technique with a big learning curve. If you own a good burr grinder and can follow directions, anyone is capable of making a great cup of coffee without much difficulty using.


What do you think about the Bodum grinders? My JCPenny had a whole Bodum section and I picked up one of the grinders when the whole section was 75% off. It was at the same price as the blade grinder it replaced.
 
2014-07-19 07:24:00 PM  

baconbeard: ghare: CruJones: I consider myself lucky after reading dark threads that I apparently have the rare ability to enjoy both "good" coffee and the free stuff at work.  Yes one is better, but both are better than no coffee.

Exactly.

That's just like beer. The only bad beer is no beer. And Corona.


Correct, I'm currently drinking a Breckenridge Brewery Agave Wheat, but three hours ago on the golf course in the 95 degree sun you can bet I was drinking Coors light.

Time and place.
 
2014-07-19 07:30:26 PM  
thornhill:making a quality craft beer is largely about having a good sense of taste and understanding the brewing process. The ingredients are easy to access and buy. Coffee is about the beans. Everyone is using the same roasting equipment and technique.

Interestingly, this may not be true for much longer.  There is a very rapidly escalating strain on the hop supply chain right now.  The hop growers are getting high bids on crops that won't be grown for years in the future, resulting in lucrative contracts from those breweries with sufficient resources and foresight.  Of course, that's bad news for the smallest players, and even worse news for those who haven't opened yet.  How can a new guy compete if he can't even fulfill his recipe, let alone put it on the shelf at a reasonable price?  The death knell of the brewery boom?

Now would be a good time to go into the hop growing business.
 
2014-07-19 07:35:11 PM  

Tobin_Lam: thornhill: Comparing the growing high-end coffee scene to craft beer isn't really accurate.

It's so easy and cheap to produce bottle beer (and many kinds of hard liquor) that the market is becoming increasingly flooded with "craft" beers from people that have no clue what they're doing -- a lot of the stuff tastes like crap.

With coffee, you need a good amount of capital to gain access to quality beans, and the sources of beans change year to year. Last year NPR did a great story how roasters like Stumptown have buyers constantly traveling the world looking for beans.

Or to put this another way, making a quality craft beer is largely about having a good sense of taste and understanding the brewing process. The ingredients are easy to access and buy. Coffee is about the beans. Everyone is using the same roasting equipment and technique.

Now one last element with coffee is of course the brewing method, which can wildly vary. Only espresso takes a lot of technique with a big learning curve. If you own a good burr grinder and can follow directions, anyone is capable of making a great cup of coffee without much difficulty using.

What do you think about the Bodum grinders? My JCPenny had a whole Bodum section and I picked up one of the grinders when the whole section was 75% off. It was at the same price as the blade grinder it replaced.


Anything less than $200 is typically a piece of crap -- except for the hand crank grinders, like the Harios.

Producing a consistent coarse grind takes a lot of precision.
 
Displayed 50 of 73 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report