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(Fox News)   California approves $500 fine for people who waste water, wash a domestic car   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Californians, water conservations, car wash, water district, wastewater  
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927 clicks; posted to Politics » on 18 Jul 2014 at 12:13 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-18 10:30:54 AM  
I wish potable water scarcity was a problem I knew how to invest in the solution to, because it's pretty easy to see that it's coming.
 
2014-07-18 11:45:53 AM  
That's wash a car without a spray nozzle that shuts off.
 
2014-07-18 12:17:54 PM  

incendi: I wish potable water scarcity was a problem I knew how to invest in the solution to, because it's pretty easy to see that it's coming.


It's not actually hard.  Move to a place with a lower population density, and a climate that won't become inhospitably arid after another 3 degrees C of warming.  Buy as much land as possible.  Sell after those 3 degrees happen.
 
2014-07-18 12:18:22 PM  
I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.

droughtmonitor.unl.edu
 
2014-07-18 12:18:25 PM  
Good. There are more important things on Earth than your vanity.
 
2014-07-18 12:19:46 PM  

incendi: I wish potable water scarcity was a problem I knew how to invest in the solution to, because it's pretty easy to see that it's coming.


Mr Pickens just took advantage of some back asswords laws in Texas to drill for his oil and then sell it to cities and towns nearby. Well, after he has sold another portion to fracking companies.
 
2014-07-18 12:21:46 PM  

borg: That's wash a car without a spray nozzle that shuts off.


Washing a car without a nozzle is a bit silly too. The nozzle gives you the pressure you need to actually spray the thing off. So I guess this is a non-story

Cue Fox News outraged over the liberal-enviro-hippie-nutjobs. Also, be sure to keep an eye out for the idiots who roll coal pulling up to fire hydrants and opening em up.
 
2014-07-18 12:22:53 PM  
There's always the post-beer car wash. But then a cop could come up and say "Urine trouble now!"
 
2014-07-18 12:23:23 PM  
Can people still fill their swimming pools?
 
2014-07-18 12:23:27 PM  
If fines don't work, Marcus said the board would consider other steps, such as requiring water districts to stop leaks in their pipes, which account for an estimated 10 percent of water use

Um ... yeah. Infrastructure is last on their list?
 
2014-07-18 12:24:33 PM  

Anonymous Bosch: Good. There are more important things on Earth than your vanity.


B..b..b..but you liberals were complaining about not giving people in Detroit water to drink.  For free.  Double standard much?
 
2014-07-18 12:25:15 PM  

Nadie_AZ: If fines don't work, Marcus said the board would consider other steps, such as requiring water districts to stop leaks in their pipes, which account for an estimated 10 percent of water use

Um ... yeah. Infrastructure is last on their list?


paying for infrastructure costs money

fining people makes money
 
2014-07-18 12:27:28 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.


Why should they? They know that climate change is a myth.
 
2014-07-18 12:28:43 PM  
Is it still ok to get my car washed by a bunch of HS cheerleaders for $10 or will that cost me $500 too?
 
2014-07-18 12:29:35 PM  
GOOD
vegashousingreport.com
 
2014-07-18 12:30:29 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.

[droughtmonitor.unl.edu image 850x656]


The Great Lakes = one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water on the planet.

Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.  Maybe the population should be shifting the other way instead, towards regions with abundant fresh water.
 
2014-07-18 12:33:00 PM  
At least in LA this won't do much. They have six or seven water enforcement employees to watch the entire city. Even when they do catch someone violating the water restrictions, they only issue a fine on the 3rd offense.
 
2014-07-18 12:33:52 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.

[droughtmonitor.unl.edu image 850x656]

The Great Lakes = one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water on the planet.

Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.  Maybe the population should be shifting the other way instead, towards regions with abundant fresh water.


I had one older water guy tell me the solution to the problem was easy- move to Saint Louis.
 
2014-07-18 12:33:54 PM  
Are they sill dragging their feet to install water meters in the most populated city?
 
2014-07-18 12:35:45 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.


Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.


[droughtmonitor.unl.edu image 850x656]


The Great Lakes = one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water on the planet.


Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.  Maybe the population should be shifting the other way instead, towards regions with abundant fresh water.



True, the desert climate is not capable of sustaining such a large population, but the most under-represented culprits in the CA drought are cattle ranchers and the lardasses of the world who can't/won't stop eating beef.
 
2014-07-18 12:38:12 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.


You mean praying harder didn't work?
 
2014-07-18 12:41:21 PM  
It is as important to talk about water quality as quantity. I'm not sure drinking Great Lakes water is a great idea. Around here in Albuquerque, the aquifer is threatened by a huge jet fuel spill that went decades before it was discovered. That fuel is likely to contaminate the few arsenic free wells which are integral in reducing arsenic levels for all of the water in Albuquerque.

The Air Force and Mayor are willing to try and keep pushing this down to the next administration. Stupid
 
2014-07-18 12:42:37 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.


Doc Daneeka: Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.


The problem is people moving from water-rich areas and not changing their habits to align with their new environments.
 
2014-07-18 12:44:24 PM  

incendi: I wish potable water scarcity was a problem I knew how to invest in the solution to, because it's pretty easy to see that it's coming.


Buy land near the headwaters. Payment for ecosystem services is a concept that is only going to spread, especially after the demonstrable success that is NYC's water supply.
 
2014-07-18 12:46:24 PM  
Public shaming also works wonders


http://www.sfreporter.com/santafe/article-8371-top-10-water-guzzlers. h tml
 
2014-07-18 12:48:09 PM  
i.kinja-img.com

DOES NOT APPROVE

 
2014-07-18 12:48:15 PM  

Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.

[droughtmonitor.unl.edu image 850x656]

The Great Lakes = one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water on the planet.

Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.  Maybe the population should be shifting the other way instead, towards regions with abundant fresh water.



Residential water use is only about 10% of consumption. Most of water consumption is agricultural. Moving the entire population affects local water supply a little, but on the other side of your equation -- moving all agricultural activity to the land adjacent to the Great Lakes -- just isn't possible.

www.environment.ucla.edu
 
2014-07-18 12:52:37 PM  

StopLurkListen: Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.

Arizona has a bunch under control, though I wish we'd tell everyone in Mesa and Arcadia to quit growing grass.

[droughtmonitor.unl.edu image 850x656]

The Great Lakes = one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water on the planet.

Maybe it wasn't the greatest idea for people to move away from Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, etc and move to Arizona, Texas, and southern California and place ever-greater water consumption demands on drought-prone desert climates.  Maybe the population should be shifting the other way instead, towards regions with abundant fresh water.


Residential water use is only about 10% of consumption. Most of water consumption is agricultural. Moving the entire population affects local water supply a little, but on the other side of your equation -- moving all agricultural activity to the land adjacent to the Great Lakes -- just isn't possible.


I recall reading in Cadillac Desert that there was a plan in the 50's to string a bunch of nuclear power plants together to power pumping water from the Mississippi over the continental divide.

The real problem is that people think the government is going to provide a solution, maybe truck water in and pump it from 1000 miles away. Nope
 
2014-07-18 12:54:35 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.


Further deregulate polluting industries and privatize their water sources cause of willful ignorance.
 
2014-07-18 12:54:49 PM  

incendi: I wish potable water scarcity was a problem I knew how to invest in the solution to, because it's pretty easy to see that it's coming.


Invest in desalination and grey water reuse technologies.
 
2014-07-18 12:56:43 PM  

gilatrout: I recall reading in Cadillac Desert that there was a plan in the 50's to string a bunch of nuclear power plants together to power pumping water from the Mississippi over the continental divide.


My favorite crack pot plan was to pump ocean water into death valley, and use death valley as a desal plant.
 
2014-07-18 01:12:54 PM  

Nadie_AZ: I'm really curious as to what Texas is going to do, as they are in a heap o trouble, too.


Wichita Falls trucked in water to keep their waterpark open, that's the kind of forward thinking we've come to expect from the Lone Star State.
 
2014-07-18 01:29:45 PM  

patrick767: At least in LA this won't do much. They have six or seven water enforcement employees to watch the entire city. Even when they do catch someone violating the water restrictions, they only issue a fine on the 3rd offense.


Never underestimate the peoples' willingness to phone in a complaint on their neighbors.

/busy bodies can suck it
 
2014-07-18 01:43:03 PM  

kidgenius: borg: That's wash a car without a spray nozzle that shuts off.

Washing a car without a nozzle is a bit silly too. The nozzle gives you the pressure you need to actually spray the thing off. So I guess this is a non-story

Cue Fox News outraged over the liberal-enviro-hippie-nutjobs. Also, be sure to keep an eye out for the idiots who roll coal pulling up to fire hydrants and opening em up.



I love that right wingers think that scarcity is just a thing that doesn't exist.  As if regulating the use of scarce but essential resources something the government shouldn't be doing.

I guess when your religion is that "the free market fixes everything," there's not much room for responsible governance.
 
2014-07-18 01:45:56 PM  
I feel like maybe stuff like this

cdn.allprescott.com

Doesn't belong in the middle of the desert.
 
2014-07-18 01:48:37 PM  

Chummer45: I guess when your religion is that "the free market fixes everything," there's not much room for responsible governance.


The free market optimizes resource allocation.


the rich define "optimum"
 
2014-07-18 01:48:58 PM  

StopLurkListen: Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ:


Residential water use is only about 10% of consumption. Most of water consumption is agricultural. Moving the entire population affects local water supply a little, but on the other side of your equation -- moving all agricultural activity to the land adjacent to the Great Lakes -- just isn't possible.

[www.environment.ucla.edu image 800x536]


Why not? Aside from delicious avocados, what can you only grow in California but not the rust belt? Not trying to start a flame war or anything but it doesn't make sense to fine someone for washing there car but being allowing farming communities to not be more heavily taxed. Migrate to where a resource is more plentiful, that is what humans have always done.
 
2014-07-18 01:54:45 PM  

incendi: Chummer45: I guess when your religion is that "the free market fixes everything," there's not much room for responsible governance.

The free market optimizes resource allocation.


the rich define "optimum"



Indeed.  If the rich can afford to water their lush 5 acre lawn in the desert, then that's optimal.  Conversely, if the poor can't afford water they'll just die from dehydration - that's what we call a "market correction."
 
2014-07-18 01:56:18 PM  

great_tigers: what can you only grow in California but not the rust belt?


Almonds.
 
2014-07-18 02:00:47 PM  

Madewithrealbitsofpanther: great_tigers: what can you only grow in California but not the rust belt?

Almonds.


Food. In the winter.
 
2014-07-18 02:19:28 PM  
Oh look it's Faux "News" complaining about how liberals are ruining the good ol' days again.

Really, stop clicking on that shiat. Murdoch needs to go out of business. Doesn't help when people support his bullshiat right-wing propaganda network.
 
2014-07-18 02:28:10 PM  
Good. You're a farking selfish moron if you're watering your lawn during a severe drought, and deserve to be hit right in the pocket book.
 
2014-07-18 02:39:57 PM  

ikanreed: Anonymous Bosch: Good. There are more important things on Earth than your vanity.

B..b..b..but you liberals were complaining about not giving people in Detroit water to drink.  For free.  Double standard much?



No.

Detroit had nothing to do with excessive use of water during a severe drought.

River by Los Angeles:
you-are-here.com
and only 14.99 inches of annual rainfall when they aren't suffering from a sever multi-year drought.

River by Detroit:
teammichiganhunting.com
plus the 31.33 inches annual rainfall with no drought in sight.
 
2014-07-18 02:40:15 PM  

D-Liver: True, the desert climate is not capable of sustaining such a large population, but the most under-represented culprits in the CA drought are cattle ranchers and the lardasses of the world who can't/won't stop eating beef.


My Lardass eats beef that grazes on great lakes water. Shove it.
 
2014-07-18 02:43:48 PM  

great_tigers: Why not? Aside from delicious avocados, what can you only grow in California

parts of Mexico and Central America that get plenty of rain but not the rust belt?
 
2014-07-18 02:51:14 PM  

give me doughnuts: ikanreed: Anonymous Bosch: Good. There are more important things on Earth than your vanity.

B..b..b..but you liberals were complaining about not giving people in Detroit water to drink.  For free.  Double standard much?


No.

Detroit had nothing to do with excessive use of water during a severe drought.

River by Los Angeles:
[you-are-here.com image 480x320]
and only 14.99 inches of annual rainfall when they aren't suffering from a sever multi-year drought.

River by Detroit:
[teammichiganhunting.com image 432x288]
plus the 31.33 inches annual rainfall with no drought in sight.


Yay, I successfully poe'd someone.
 
2014-07-18 02:51:51 PM  

great_tigers: StopLurkListen: Doc Daneeka: Nadie_AZ:


Residential water use is only about 10% of consumption. Most of water consumption is agricultural. Moving the entire population affects local water supply a little, but on the other side of your equation -- moving all agricultural activity to the land adjacent to the Great Lakes -- just isn't possible.

[www.environment.ucla.edu image 800x536]

Why not? Aside from delicious avocados, what can you only grow in California but not the rust belt? Not trying to start a flame war or anything but it doesn't make sense to fine someone for washing there car but being allowing farming communities to not be more heavily taxed. Migrate to where a resource is more plentiful, that is what humans have always done.


Without going very in depth.

1) plenty of rust belt land is already agriculture.
2) the climate is radically different.  I don't think even GMO is going to allow for February harvests
 
2014-07-18 02:51:58 PM  
I haven't gotten around to washing my car in a few years, but sometimes when it's raining I wonder if I could just go out there with soap and a sponge and rub it down, or if it wouldn't rinse properly.  Then I realize that I don't actually want to stand around out in the rain, so I don't.  My car has algae growing on the side mirrors.

They totally continue to run though if you don't wash them.
 
2014-07-18 02:58:50 PM  

Koodz: I haven't gotten around to washing my car in a few years, but sometimes when it's raining I wonder if I could just go out there with soap and a sponge and rub it down, or if it wouldn't rinse properly.  Then I realize that I don't actually want to stand around out in the rain, so I don't.  My car has algae growing on the side mirrors.

They totally continue to run though if you don't wash them.


Proud owner of 2003 GMC Savana that has never been washed... That's what rain is for. : )
 
2014-07-18 03:03:50 PM  

Koodz: I haven't gotten around to washing my car in a few years, but sometimes when it's raining I wonder if I could just go out there with soap and a sponge and rub it down, or if it wouldn't rinse properly.  Then I realize that I don't actually want to stand around out in the rain, so I don't.  My car has algae growing on the side mirrors.

They totally continue to run though if you don't wash them.


I do a fancy 50 buck interior/exterior wash once a year in the late summer.
 
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