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(Slashdot)   People believe a computer app detects their mood, even if it simply spits out random data   (science.slashdot.org) divider line 21
    More: Interesting, human computers, computing  
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534 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jul 2014 at 12:33 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-17 10:15:47 AM  
This is new?  One of the very, very early programs you could enter into the first personal computers back in the early 1980's was to calculate your "biorhythms".

It was bogus back then, and it's bogus now, but people are willing to believe anything that comes out of a "magic box" like a computer.  It's high tech wizardry, so it *MUST* be right!
 
2014-07-17 10:20:45 AM  
If it could really read my mood, it would shut down and uninstall itself
 
2014-07-17 11:18:16 AM  
But being scientists, they were only out to prove that the placebo effect exists, not disprove that the apps could check moods. They succeeeded in proving the placebo effect exists.
 
2014-07-17 12:35:51 PM  
If you lose that mood ring app be wary of bees when you go to find it.
 
2014-07-17 12:41:50 PM  
Just stick with the tried and true methods, people.
www.bestmoodrings.com
 
2014-07-17 12:42:17 PM  
Well how hard is that? Male: print "horny"
 
2014-07-17 12:44:13 PM  
Just like horoscopes
 
2014-07-17 12:58:01 PM  

madgonad: Just like horoscopes


Came to say this.
 
2014-07-17 01:17:20 PM  
wait, you're telling me that if you hook up sensors on a subject to measure skin conductance, heart rate, and muscle activity of corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major, all of which is fed into a computer, and then you tell the subject that an on-screen avatar will show the effects of all that physiological data ... then sometimes the subject actually believes what you said?

no way.
 
2014-07-17 01:19:03 PM  

Devolving_Spud: madgonad: Just like horoscopes

Came to say this.


So did I, but I'd also include most psychological profiles.
 
2014-07-17 01:31:30 PM  

MrSteve007: Just stick with the tried and true methods, people.
[www.bestmoodrings.com image 600x450]


What's old is new all over again, just re-packaged for the mobile age. "It's the new Pet Rock app! Even less maintenance than owning an actual rock!"
 
2014-07-17 02:01:55 PM  
MIT Mood Meter

web.media.mit.edu

/obviously buggy, there are smiling faces
 
2014-07-17 02:53:03 PM  
Now how the Hell am I supposed to know what mood I'm in?
 
2014-07-17 05:48:29 PM  
People also believe in mood rings, ghosts, wrestling, god, and Bill Gates sending them to Disneyland. People are really, really stupid.
 
2014-07-17 08:37:21 PM  
There is scientific evidence out there that a human is able to affect the random readout of a computer.

The US Government used to study this a lot back in the 70's, when they had the budget to study paranormal stuff.   Carl Sagan writes about the intrigue of it...

Do you ever put your music player on shuffle, and the song that comes up is the song you were thinking about?   out of 1000's of songs?  It happens to me all the time, and more than a handful of times, it shuffled to that song, and then the next song it shuffled to that same song again.  (no, it wasn't on repeat).
 
zez
2014-07-18 12:21:58 AM  

dittybopper: This is new?  One of the very, very early programs you could enter into the first personal computers back in the early 1980's was to calculate your "biorhythms".

It was bogus back then, and it's bogus now, but people are willing to believe anything that comes out of a "magic box" like a computer.  It's high tech wizardry, so it *MUST* be right!


My 10 year old found a box of old computer stuff from college that had a biorhythm program on it. I had forgotten all about it.
 
2014-07-18 10:02:43 AM  

T.rex: There is scientific evidence out there that a human is able to affect the random readout of a computer.

The US Government used to study this a lot back in the 70's, when they had the budget to study paranormal stuff.   Carl Sagan writes about the intrigue of it...

Do you ever put your music player on shuffle, and the song that comes up is the song you were thinking about?   out of 1000's of songs?  It happens to me all the time, and more than a handful of times, it shuffled to that song, and then the next song it shuffled to that same song again.  (no, it wasn't on repeat).


Yea, another person who doesn't understand the statistics of random distributions, and falls for the fallacy of misleading vividness.

We salute you, sir.
 
2014-07-18 02:13:50 PM  

Khellendros: T.rex: There is scientific evidence out there that a human is able to affect the random readout of a computer.

The US Government used to study this a lot back in the 70's, when they had the budget to study paranormal stuff.   Carl Sagan writes about the intrigue of it...

Do you ever put your music player on shuffle, and the song that comes up is the song you were thinking about?   out of 1000's of songs?  It happens to me all the time, and more than a handful of times, it shuffled to that song, and then the next song it shuffled to that same song again.  (no, it wasn't on repeat).

Yea, another person who doesn't understand the statistics of random distributions, and falls for the fallacy of misleading vividness.

We salute you, sir.


I guess you're smarter than Carl Sagan and the government, because you use big words, and all.  Congrats to you, good sir!
 
2014-07-18 04:26:15 PM  

Khellendros: T.rex: There is scientific evidence out there that a human is able to affect the random readout of a computer.

The US Government used to study this a lot back in the 70's, when they had the budget to study paranormal stuff.   Carl Sagan writes about the intrigue of it...

Do you ever put your music player on shuffle, and the song that comes up is the song you were thinking about?   out of 1000's of songs?  It happens to me all the time, and more than a handful of times, it shuffled to that song, and then the next song it shuffled to that same song again.  (no, it wasn't on repeat).

Yea, another person who doesn't understand the statistics of random distributions, and falls for the fallacy of misleading vividness.


Pop quiz:  how many songs do you have to listen to, on average, before you hear a song repeated twice in a row, assuming 1000 songs in your library?
 
2014-07-18 07:31:10 PM  

Ambitwistor: Khellendros: T.rex: There is scientific evidence out there that a human is able to affect the random readout of a computer.

The US Government used to study this a lot back in the 70's, when they had the budget to study paranormal stuff.   Carl Sagan writes about the intrigue of it...

Do you ever put your music player on shuffle, and the song that comes up is the song you were thinking about?   out of 1000's of songs?  It happens to me all the time, and more than a handful of times, it shuffled to that song, and then the next song it shuffled to that same song again.  (no, it wasn't on repeat).

Yea, another person who doesn't understand the statistics of random distributions, and falls for the fallacy of misleading vividness.

Pop quiz:  how many songs do you have to listen to, on average, before you hear a song repeated twice in a row, assuming 1000 songs in your library?


I believe the twice is a row is moot..  Its a 1 in a 1000 chance, and then a 1 in a 1000 chance once again.   You can't accumalitively count them together as one set of data.
 
2014-07-18 08:33:55 PM  

T.rex: Ambitwistor: Pop quiz:  how many songs do you have to listen to, on average, before you hear a song repeated twice in a row, assuming 1000 songs in your library?

I believe the twice is a row is moot..  Its a 1 in a 1000 chance, and then a 1 in a 1000 chance once again.   You can't accumalitively count them together as one set of data.


Statistics are fun that way. Like if you flip a coin 100 times, what are the odds it will be heads every time?  Well, 50/50 every single flip, I suppose.
 
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