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(TreeHugger)   Not to alarm you, but the home that you live in may have high cholesterol   (treehugger.com) divider line 14
    More: Strange, high cholesterol, Chrysler Building  
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2605 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jul 2014 at 10:01 PM (8 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-17 09:22:22 PM
Centuries ago, when people had to gather their own wood and maintain a fire to keep warm

Sure, lets go back to everyone burning wood for warmth. That's SO environmentally friendly.
 
2014-07-17 10:03:37 PM
So the pipes will become more and more clogged over time?  Sounds about right.
 
2014-07-17 10:07:18 PM
I'm assuming this is some sort of metaphor predicated on the incorrect notion that cholesterol (technically lipoproteins that carry cholesterol if you're talking about HDL, LDL, etc.) are somehow bad for you.
 
2014-07-17 10:11:57 PM
"The result is that our buildings today perform marginally better".

There is a cholesterol joke in there butter facade.
 
2014-07-17 10:21:05 PM
This is a problem I learned about in biology. As something scales larger, the volume cubes but the surface area squares. So, in biology if a bacterium grew four times as large as usual it's surface area is 16 times larger, but its insides are 64 times larger.

Now, translate that to a building. Lets use the concrete condo from Fight Club as an example. One unit, in a field, is exposed to weather on five sides. Start stacking them up and mostly they're only showing one wall to the outside. The outer wall isn't as big a thermal factor as being stacked with other units.

There are economies of scale to buildings, although there's also fragilities caused by size. One house, one fire burns out one family. 16 unit apartment building, one idiot can put 16 families at risk. Thus fire codes, firewalls, and enforcement. And arcologies just stack problems on problems, but the could be pleasant in the right places.
 
2014-07-17 10:31:29 PM

pseudowho: I'm assuming this is some sort of metaphor predicated on the incorrect notion that cholesterol (technically lipoproteins that carry cholesterol if you're talking about HDL, LDL, etc.) are somehow bad for you.


"What's a high cholesterol building? One that's on a fad diet today but will have severe environmental problems in the future."

I guess someone with high cholesterol could be on a fad diet, but it would make more sense if they named the buildings after a fad diet, like "Paleo Buildings" or "Gluten Free Buildings"
 
2014-07-17 10:39:02 PM

whatshisname: pseudowho: I'm assuming this is some sort of metaphor predicated on the incorrect notion that cholesterol (technically lipoproteins that carry cholesterol if you're talking about HDL, LDL, etc.) are somehow bad for you.

"What's a high cholesterol building? One that's on a fad diet today but will have severe environmental problems in the future."

I guess someone with high cholesterol could be on a fad diet, but it would make more sense if they named the buildings after a fad diet, like "Paleo Buildings" or "Gluten Free Buildings"


I swear engineers and architects are terrible brand managers.   'LEED' is so bland.
 
2014-07-17 10:42:33 PM

Petey4335: whatshisname: pseudowho: I'm assuming this is some sort of metaphor predicated on the incorrect notion that cholesterol (technically lipoproteins that carry cholesterol if you're talking about HDL, LDL, etc.) are somehow bad for you.

"What's a high cholesterol building? One that's on a fad diet today but will have severe environmental problems in the future."

I guess someone with high cholesterol could be on a fad diet, but it would make more sense if they named the buildings after a fad diet, like "Paleo Buildings" or "Gluten Free Buildings"

I swear engineers and architects are terrible brand managers.   'LEED' is so bland.


I would have called LEED "Enviroblaster Megatron Plus" "Enviroblaster Megatron Supreme" and "Envirobalster Megatron Supreme, now with added Greening Powers"
 
2014-07-17 11:25:23 PM
I like how the author get schooled in comments
 
2014-07-17 11:28:04 PM
R1=1 inch of rock
so a cave could have an R factor of 100 in the walls (sure 0 at the open door)
ok it had to let the smoke out in winter
so if they lied at that one....
 
2014-07-17 11:37:52 PM

fusillade762: Centuries ago, when people had to gather their own wood and maintain a fire to keep warm

Sure, lets go back to everyone burning wood for warmth. That's SO environmentally friendly.


It actually is. Trees store contemporary carbon, and then re-emit it when burned, meaning that wood-burning produces no "net carbon."
 
2014-07-18 12:13:08 AM
So they are advocating we start building bunker buildings with thick concrete walls and tiny unopenable double pane portholes? 60 years ago it would have made sense from a pollution stand point in that most of our power came from coal plants.
 
2014-07-18 12:58:26 AM
Older homes tended to be built more sturdily for several reasons; pride in workmanship, wood did not cost a fortune for one board, old growth trees were used which had denser cellular structure, unlike the faster growing, replacement trees planted today, folks built a home to last generations -- and not to 'flip' it for a fast profit and you didn't need a garage full of expensive power tools to make repairs.

I recall thin galvanized steel beams being used to replace 2x4 wall studs, and wondering just how many years they would last before rusting out. I've been in buildings over 100 years old and found wooden wall studs not only in great condition, but made even stronger and harder by time.

There used to be an art in glazing windows, especially the multi-paned ones, with the glazier carefully pushing in a clay-like putty to seal the seams. Now, a strip of hot, molten plastic is applied before the genuine, artificial wood frame is fitted around the thinner, cheaper pane of glass.

Wood floors were tongue and grooved together tightly, not snapped together and not made of 20% sawdust and 80% plastic, requiring a plastic barrier underneath.

I've found bedroom doors hung over 50 years ago that are solid wood -- not the thin panels covering some sort of foam core. They fit tightly also. Front doors were made of solid wood, often consisting of expertly fitted panels and sold enough to prevent being kicked in.

However, today, such a door would cost far too much for the average home owner.

I have pointed out, for ages, that high weight and high cholesterol was not that big of a deal in your great-grandparents age because they worked it off. Their daily lives were much more labor intensive and they did a lot more walking. There were few electric labor saving devices, no Swifter-Sweepers, no $500 super suction vacuum cleaners with turbo action and no steam carpet cleaners.

Most were happy to have indoor plumbing.

Though, through various means, their lives were shorter, often due to ignorance of harmful things, like lead, strychnine, patent medicines, no antibiotics, no vaccines and many relied mainly on home remedies to cure illnesses -- like kerosene spread on bread, covered with honey and eaten, chased by a shot of booze. Plus, a lot of the tools they worked with were dangerous as heck, with few safety guards. Especially in factories.

They could eat a ton of bacon for breakfast, slather a pound of butter on their toast, cook with lard and crisp and enjoy the fats on meats -- because they'd work off the calories and the cholesterol doing their daily chores. Especially farmers.

I still recall my Dad having an unpowered push mower to cut the lawn with. Gears in the big wheels turned that wicked set of curved cylinder blades, which needed to be sharpened with a file. That was a beast to push through thick grass and it was a big thing when he bought a powered mower -- it still had to be pushed, but the gas engine just sliced through that grass and made things easier.
Changes in lifestyle has caused the increase in cholesterol in folks and I've seen enough homes blown apart by hurricanes to doubt the building techniques -- especially when the only homes in a block still standing were built 100 years ago.

BTW. I recall when no one had home air-conditioning, and few stores had more than ceiling fans. Here in Florida, you NEED a/c, because of the heat and humidity.

Old style Florida homes, built to circulate air for coolness have nothing compared to a nice 20,000 BTU unit humming away and keeping the inside at 76 degrees when it's 92 outside with 75% humidity.
 
2014-07-18 09:08:16 AM

whatshisname: pseudowho: I'm assuming this is some sort of metaphor predicated on the incorrect notion that cholesterol (technically lipoproteins that carry cholesterol if you're talking about HDL, LDL, etc.) are somehow bad for you.

"What's a high cholesterol building? One that's on a fad diet today but will have severe environmental problems in the future."

I guess someone with high cholesterol could be on a fad diet, but it would make more sense if they named the buildings after a fad diet, like "Paleo Buildings" or "Gluten Free Buildings"


Cholesterol is the building block for cell membranes. Low cholesterol would be far more dangerous and a better joke for this article. And the fad diet to refer to would be vegan.
 
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