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(DFW Star-Telegram)   New plant species found in West Texas. Botanists are calling it a 'tree'   (star-telegram.com) divider line 26
    More: Interesting, West Texas, floras, flowering plants, poisonous plants, botanists, eggplants, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, National Science Foundation  
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2524 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Jul 2014 at 12:21 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-16 09:31:39 AM
Poisonous? Spiny? It'd have to be growing on groundwater that can eat the paint off a car.
 
2014-07-16 09:53:17 AM
www.ktxs.com
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-16 10:39:38 AM
Paper here: New species and combinations in Solanum section Androceras (Solanaceae). According to the abstract the new species differs from relatives "in having white corollas." I didn't think they went for foreign cars in Texas.
 
2014-07-16 12:40:51 PM

ZAZ: Paper here: New species and combinations in Solanum section Androceras (Solanaceae). According to the abstract the new species differs from relatives "in having white corollas." I didn't think they went for foreign cars in Texas.


It's considered acceptable as long as you put a giant Texas flag in front of the dealership.
 
2014-07-16 01:01:26 PM
Was it found one night in Rosa's cantina?
 
2014-07-16 01:04:20 PM
High five subby! I laughed out loud.
 
2014-07-16 01:11:12 PM

YixilTesiphon: ZAZ: Paper here: New species and combinations in Solanum section Androceras (Solanaceae). According to the abstract the new species differs from relatives "in having white corollas." I didn't think they went for foreign cars in Texas.

It's considered acceptable as long as you put a giant Texas flag in front of the dealership.


Fun fact:  The reason why dealerships have such gigantic flags is not for their patriotism.  The dealership would rather have a gigantic sign for their company.  However, local zoning, usually limits or prohibits signage above a certain size and or height.  Flags are not regulated in the same way.  So Joe Bob Nissan of Bedford can't put up a huge sign but he can fly a big flag. Plus 'murica and all that...
 
2014-07-16 01:13:27 PM

YixilTesiphon: It's considered acceptable as long as you put a giant Texas flag in front of the dealership.


You call that flag giant?  Clearwater laughs at your feeble attempt at gigantism.

Now THAT'S a FLAG!

(I thought everything was supposed to be bigger in Texas)
 
2014-07-16 01:35:59 PM

flamark: YixilTesiphon: It's considered acceptable as long as you put a giant Texas flag in front of the dealership.

You call that flag giant?  Clearwater laughs at your feeble attempt at gigantism.

Now THAT'S a FLAG!

(I thought everything was supposed to be bigger in Texas)


get OUT of the middle of the road, you're gonna get hit
 
2014-07-16 01:37:47 PM
Ted Cruz is calling for its deportation
 
2014-07-16 01:39:18 PM
So on a slightly more serious note, is it a NEW plant species and and OLD one?
Is it the last of its kind, or the first of its kind?
How do they tell the difference?
 
2014-07-16 02:21:47 PM
Triffid.
 
2014-07-16 03:42:27 PM

Begoggle: Ted Cruz is calling for its deportation


I can see why.  It's nothing but pricks and leans to the right.  He's probably afraid it'll run against him.
 
2014-07-16 03:52:33 PM
Let me get this straight:

1.  Only two specimens of this plant have ever been found before.  They were picked, mounted and misidentified several years ago.

2. The plant is believed to be extremely rare, perhaps endangered.

3  Scientists make a concentrated effort to find it alive, after weeks of trying, they find ONE living plant.

4. "All three specimens of  Solanum cordicitum are now pressed and mounted in museums."

Well, there was a new species in West Texas.
 
2014-07-16 04:13:00 PM
Too bad. That's where we're putting in the new WOOL*MORT n Chick-Fil-A.
 
2014-07-16 05:29:55 PM

Lex A. Preau: Let me get this straight:

1.  Only two specimens of this plant have ever been found before.  They were picked, mounted and misidentified several years ago.

2. The plant is believed to be extremely rare, perhaps endangered.

3  Scientists make a concentrated effort to find it alive, after weeks of trying, they find ONE living plant.

4. "All three specimens of  Solanum cordicitum are now pressed and mounted in museums."

Well, there was a new species in West Texas.


I'm glad I wasn't the only one who thought of that. Didn't we have a link a while back with some scientists arguing about that very thing - us searching for rare critters and then immediately killing them for collection which could hurt the struggling species' survival chances and genetic diversity?

It seems like hires pictures, data about its location and maybe a DNA sample would be all we'd really need. Why kill it if there aren't many left? Do we plan on trying to find the rest and killing them all too? It's bad enough we have mouth-breathers and greedy capitalists ready to extinct anything that looks at them funny... We don't need scientists giving the coup de grace to endangered species too!
 
2014-07-16 05:44:29 PM

mongbiohazard: Lex A. Preau: Let me get this straight:

1.  Only two specimens of this plant have ever been found before.  They were picked, mounted and misidentified several years ago.

2. The plant is believed to be extremely rare, perhaps endangered.

3  Scientists make a concentrated effort to find it alive, after weeks of trying, they find ONE living plant.

4. "All three specimens of  Solanum cordicitum are now pressed and mounted in museums."

Well, there was a new species in West Texas.

I'm glad I wasn't the only one who thought of that. Didn't we have a link a while back with some scientists arguing about that very thing - us searching for rare critters and then immediately killing them for collection which could hurt the struggling species' survival chances and genetic diversity?

It seems like hires pictures, data about its location and maybe a DNA sample would be all we'd really need. Why kill it if there aren't many left? Do we plan on trying to find the rest and killing them all too? It's bad enough we have mouth-breathers and greedy capitalists ready to extinct anything that looks at them funny... We don't need scientists giving the coup de grace to endangered species too!


yes no sort of ...
say it really is the LAST ONE
so now they have 3 specimens.
If they are genetically diverse, 3 different DNA lines.
In theory, if there were a need or desire, they would have a better chance of bringing back the species.

In the end, I am 50/50 on this.
1) who cares, it is one of many random species which would die out every year because it has been pushed out.
2) WHY stop on the last one just to stomp on it?!

Hmmm, maybe they didnt know it was the last one, until they got it back, cataloged it, learned that it was "unique" and that whoops, maybe they should have just left it.

History is filled with specimen collection. For some species, that is all that is left, so, kind of nice to have something, rather than nothing.
 
2014-07-16 05:46:57 PM
although it's most likely not edible for either humans or animals.

That would surprise me. Usually the toxins in nightshades are to keep the mammals away - they want to be eaten by birds and so they've evolved neurotoxins that don't bother birds. The ones that don't have mammal repellant toxins usually have a name like "wolf's peach" or "wolfberry" due to what eats them in the wild.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-16 05:52:28 PM
mongbiohazard

The rules say names of plants are based on preserved specimens. It has been found in the past that names based on descriptions alone are inadequate, although one could imagine that DNA analysis would be sufficient for the future.

Say you're looking at a series of plants. They clearly sort into two groups with longer and shorter hairs on the stem. You have a description of a species. Both your groups match the description, which says the stem has hairs but doesn't say how long they are. One of your groups is the existing species, the other is new. Which is which?  If there is a type specimen, you can look at it and discover the important features that were left out of the original description.

Quoting the standard of botanical nomenclature:
The type (holotype, lectotype, or neotype) of a name of a species or infraspecific taxon is either a single specimen conserved in one herbarium or other collection or institution, or an illustration.
Another rule says the option to use an illustration as type specimen expired on January 1, 2007. So they can't give the plant a name unless there is a preserved specimen for others to examine. Possibly they could have used one of the two existing preserved specimens.
 
2014-07-16 06:46:36 PM

Fark like a Barsoomian: although it's most likely not edible for either humans or animals.

That would surprise me. Usually the toxins in nightshades are to keep the mammals away - they want to be eaten by birds and so they've evolved neurotoxins that don't bother birds. The ones that don't have mammal repellant toxins usually have a name like "wolf's peach" or "wolfberry" due to what eats them in the wild.


Same with pepper plants. The hottest pepper in the world won't do a damn thing to a bird. It's our damn mammal teeth, what with the grinding and crushing. Plants want the seeds to come out the other end intact.
 
2014-07-16 06:56:07 PM
I just learned that there are only 1500 species of flowering plants and they're all in the same genus. And all these years, I thought there were hundreds of thousands of species scattered through thousands upon thousands of genera.
 
2014-07-16 07:40:41 PM

MrHappyRotter: I just learned that there are only 1500 species of flowering plants and they're all in the same genus. And all these years, I thought there were hundreds of thousands of species scattered through thousands upon thousands of genera.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flowering_plant#Classification
um no ... no there is not
 
2014-07-16 08:10:42 PM
I just learned there's no limit to the density of the human skull. And all these years, I thought there were basic biological and physical limitations that would prevent bone thickness after a certain point.
 
2014-07-16 10:05:17 PM
It belongs in a museum!
 
2014-07-16 10:11:50 PM
www.redorbit.com

Did someone break a meteor in Texas?
 
2014-07-17 12:00:59 PM
i1.ytimg.com

/Going Sunday.
 
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