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(NBC News)   That giant sucking sound you hear is Texas water going south. They took our dihydrogen monoxide   (nbcnews.com) divider line 35
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13121 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2014 at 8:04 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-07-15 05:52:12 PM  
6 votes:
I know who can get some water for them...


img.fark.net
2014-07-15 08:49:18 PM  
5 votes:
Pray harder Texans.
2014-07-15 07:41:54 PM  
5 votes:
Looks like they done freedomed themselves real good
2014-07-15 09:23:37 PM  
4 votes:
Usul, tell me of your home world...
2014-07-15 08:20:20 PM  
4 votes:
If only someone had pointed out decades ago that natural resources are not infinite.
2014-07-15 07:39:24 PM  
4 votes:
Looks like somebody's been neglecting the moisture farm again.

philosophyforchange.files.wordpress.com
2014-07-15 08:50:19 PM  
3 votes:
Well I'll grab my spears and buckler.....

www.grey-tower.net

I will also be offering unconditional protection for any Texas residents skilled in blacksmithing who want it.
2014-07-15 08:36:45 PM  
3 votes:
so in the end they'll just have sand?

www.inpapasbasement.com
2014-07-15 11:38:47 PM  
2 votes:

Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, (also) in Texas...

[s.newsweek.com image 240x167]


OMFGs I want to see a Mark XXXIII Bolo run that thing over and smush it flat.
2014-07-15 10:53:21 PM  
2 votes:

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By ...

img2.wikia.nocookie.net
2014-07-15 09:41:53 PM  
2 votes:
Oh no. Not Texas. Not that shining bastion of rational thought and humanitarian concern. Oh how it makes me weep.
2014-07-15 09:21:32 PM  
2 votes:
It's just as well. DHMO is a dangerous chemical that has been implicated in the deaths of millions of Americans.
2014-07-15 09:17:18 PM  
2 votes:

CruJones: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: KarmicDisaster: I like the way that they are "pumping the last drops". Then they can try shootin the ground.

Everyone in Texas is against conservation of water, because it would cost jobs.

Hey, here in San Antonio we do really well actually. I think the same amount of water as when the city was half the size, ever since they found the blind salamander we have to be gentle with our aquifer. Really.

/we are building a new desalination plant too


SA Represent! Brushing my teeth with tequila was only hard the first time.
2014-07-15 09:00:10 PM  
2 votes:
I've been assured by Fark Independents that the free market guarantees the best outcomes.

Why would this be any different?
2014-07-15 08:33:46 PM  
2 votes:
"The American Breadbasket" sounds like a buffet where fat teabaggers stuff their pieholes with a parking lot full of Tahoes and F150s.
2014-07-15 06:10:29 PM  
2 votes:
media.tumblr.com

DURKA DUR!
2014-07-16 03:21:05 AM  
1 votes:
I guess Harold and the whole gang up at Possum Lodge need to keep a better eye on the lakes.
media2.s-nbcnews.com
2014-07-16 12:47:17 AM  
1 votes:
upload.wikimedia.org

Soon...
2014-07-16 12:47:09 AM  
1 votes:
We don't need water. We have Brawndo!
2014-07-15 11:22:54 PM  
1 votes:

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By ...


Your post is awesome read in this voice:

img3.wikia.nocookie.net
2014-07-15 10:53:26 PM  
1 votes:
Why is Red Green featured prominently in this article?
2014-07-15 09:50:56 PM  
1 votes:
Meanwhile, (also) in Texas...

s.newsweek.com
2014-07-15 09:42:34 PM  
1 votes:
I'm sure they will pick themselves up by the bootstraps. Let's not worry.
2014-07-15 09:24:00 PM  
1 votes:
I do find it amusing to see teabagger Texans who rallied against environmental regulations discover that their business depends on the environment.
2014-07-15 09:20:15 PM  
1 votes:

dangelder: Cite the comment ? Oh wait, it never happened, did it?


Same place as RP found the comments by the Fark Independents.  Poking the strawmen is fun, isn't it?
2014-07-15 09:10:06 PM  
1 votes:
Why can't farmers just make more water?
2014-07-15 08:36:10 PM  
1 votes:
Here is an idea, Don't farm a farking desert!
2014-07-15 08:34:48 PM  
1 votes:
and yet the red river (northern) and the Mississippi flood almost every year... why not divert the excess to the aquifer ?
2014-07-15 08:31:18 PM  
1 votes:
That giant sucking sound you hear is Texas water going south.

Actually I don't hate Texas, but it just seemed funnier to fix the headline
2014-07-15 08:31:05 PM  
1 votes:

MemeSlave: Move where the water is.


Californians would rather steal it from everyone else. And if it keeps them away from me I'd call that a fair exchange.
2014-07-15 08:24:52 PM  
1 votes:
Move where the water is.
2014-07-15 08:21:21 PM  
1 votes:

Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: Looks like somebody's been neglecting the moisture farm again.

[philosophyforchange.files.wordpress.com image 300x400]


That kid's useless. Mouthy, too
2014-07-15 08:21:10 PM  
1 votes:

Mentat: It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...


did he live in Vermont?
'cause we're good
2014-07-15 08:08:20 PM  
1 votes:
www.betterlivingthroughbeowulf.com
Frowns on your modern dust bowl.
2014-07-15 06:17:12 PM  
1 votes:

Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

Yes, the story is about farming, but damn we waste a lot of water in other ways.


Or we could encourage people to move out of the farking desert.

/just a thought.
 
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