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(NBC News)   That giant sucking sound you hear is Texas water going south. They took our dihydrogen monoxide   (nbcnews.com) divider line 210
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13121 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2014 at 8:04 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-15 10:23:12 PM  

DoctorWhat: rustypouch: I've been assured by Fark Independents that the free market guarantees the best outcomes.

Why would this be any different?

Free market only works well when the costs are borne by the producers at about the same time and place as the product is made.  Then they pass the costs on to the consumer, and if another producer finds a better way or place, the free market selects them.  But if the costs aren't part of the initial process, then the market is skewed towards those that would use resources and produce as quickly and cheaply as possible, even if everyone ends up paying more (for federal disaster aid, etc.) as a result.


It's called the Tragedy of the Commons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons ) and is hardly a new idea.  If there is a common shared resource, people will tend to over-use that resource for personal gain to the detriment of the general good.
 
2014-07-15 10:23:18 PM  

HeadLever: Stone Meadow: Of that, only 4.4 MAF...or about 5% comes from the Colorado River,

True, but that 4.4MAF is about 27% of the total appropriated water for this river.  California has the largest 'right' of any single state for Colorado River water.


Of course we do, but of the 7 states sharing the Colorado River drainage California has 38 million people, versus Colorado (5.2 million), Utah (2.9m), Wyoming (0.6m), Arizona (6.6m) and Nevada (2.8m) for a total of 18 million non-Californians sharing the USA's share of the water, so I figure we're getting screwed out of half our share.

Screwed or not, them's the cards dealt at the Colorado River Compact of 1922, and it will take an Act of God to change it.

Meanwhile, folks who claim we are somehow "stealing" other State's water are full of shiat.
 
2014-07-15 10:33:35 PM  
When you consider the amount of energy required to desalinate and pipe water several thousand miles, it really makes you appreciate the hydrologic cycle all the more.
 
2014-07-15 10:36:49 PM  

ScaryBottles: The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: I do find it amusing to see teabagger Texans who rallied against environmental regulations discover that their business depends on the environment.
Most of us who live in the urban areas of Texas are finding it pretty funny too.


All of us in the country are farking your mothers.
 
2014-07-15 10:40:18 PM  

SacriliciousBeerSwiller: I'm sure they will pick themselves up by the bootstraps. Let's not worry.


They'll just go on planting weeds, collecting on their federally subsidized crop insurance and railing against the big government that gives it to them.
 
2014-07-15 10:46:55 PM  
Wait a minute, they are blaming the watering pivots that water crops from man dug wells. Wouldn't any water sprayed on the surface, at least in part, trickle back down to the aquifer?
 
2014-07-15 10:50:20 PM  
It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By the late 70's, the city extended water lines out into rural areas, closing the majority of the individual wells. So many homes were sucking water out of the ground that the water levels had dropped drastically and pollutants had started showing up.

Of course, when the housing boom hit, darn near every square foot of the county wound up being plowed under for even more homes, with the city's blessings. Over 2000 homes and apartments went up, and most of those with lawns which require much water. They also added several hundred miles of paved roads and parking areas, which cut off acres of wild woods which used to soak up rain water like a sponge and replenish the aquifer.

So, it became mandatory for developments and businesses to build salvage ponds, which channeled drainage into them to reabsorb into the ground. Problem is, they also channel in all of the pollutants caused by the thousands of cars which had been added and the increase in delivery truck traffic.

That in turn, provided homes for the ever expanding and protected gator population, meaning the toothy critters lurked in every pond and stream -- especially on golf courses.

Since the over population had driven out the majority of wild animals, the gators started looking towards the nearby and stupid humans for food.

Now, we have water shortages. You need to have a license to fish in the lagoon but even the millions of bait fish -- Mullet -- have become so scarce that they're regulated. The cops patrol the lagoon now, checking licenses. You better have the right stamps on it for the fish you catch or face a stiff fine.

In the low waters along the shore, you can't hardly move since professional crabbers have covered the area with hundreds of traps, meaning you can no longer get those huge, delicious Blue Crabs with a chicken neck and a string. They've harvested the majority of the big, old crabs and mainly you now get the smaller, young ones.

Huge oyster beds that people harvested from for years are gone. Dug out for high end development harbors. Clam beds have been over harvested and are gone, many plowed under by new development.

One of the best ones, in a huge, shallow tidal pool is now buried under a boat ramp, tennis court, jogging trail complex.

And still, people pour into my city yearly. Traffic has become a nightmare. Decades old citrus groves have been sold and turned into housing complexes. Drainage ditches which used to run with shallow, clear water, like creeks and streams, now run with murky, dark waters, deeper and more foul.

Now people are discovering what I had been yelling about for decades.

The majority of my graduating class from High School packed up and left the state for greener pastures.

The environmental damage is obvious, yet there is no mention of limiting populations, even by banning further new housing developments.

One of the things which bothers me the most is the lagoon. As a kid I fished and swam there, camped on the banks and explored the interesting waters along the shores. The wind from the waters was fresh and salty. The surface a deep, muddy blue and nice.

Now, so many boats use the waters that on hot days the surface shimmers with coats of oil from exhaust systems and the lagoon reeks of a sour, distinctive oil and dirty water smell.

The water looks, well, sick -- in a bad way.

I rarely go to the lagoon anymore. I don't like what has happened to it.

I don't like what several thousand new residents have done to my town.

Too many people in a limited space with limited resources can cause a major disaster, yet politicians, bribed by wealthy land owners and businessmen, encourage more and more people to settle in because they bring in big profits.

BTW. 40 years back, Florida did not have the huge amount of sinkholes it now has -- caused by the lowering of the underground water levels. Folks fill them in and keep building and keep sucking water out of the ground.

Now, Texas has begun to recognize it's own stupidity, after it got too late. Folks there have been yelling for decades over water abuse and also been ignored.

We had better get into space soon and start bleeding off large amounts of the population before there is no one left.
 
2014-07-15 10:51:56 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: Wait a minute, they are blaming the watering pivots that water crops from man dug wells. Wouldn't any water sprayed on the surface, at least in part, trickle back down to the aquifer?


I would guess that when spraying water on a hot, dry day 99% of the water that the plants don't suck up would evaporate rather than make it's way back to the aquifer.
 
2014-07-15 10:53:09 PM  
In the last two days we've received nigh on three quarters of an inch of rain.  Our reservoirs are almost back to where they should be.
 
2014-07-15 10:53:21 PM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By ...

img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-15 10:53:26 PM  
Why is Red Green featured prominently in this article?
 
2014-07-15 10:55:02 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Marcus Aurelius: Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

The bottled water market is a drop in the bucket compared to the demand coming from cities in the southwest.  Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.

Not in California is doesn't.  Nestle's Arrowhead is pumping water from aquifers out in the desert, and because the land is owned by Native American tribes, there's zero oversight as to how much water they are taking.

http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/07/12/nestle-ar ro whead-tapping-water/12589267/


That is not us goverment land as you have stated. The Indians earns the right to screw the white man and earn profit from their private land. It sux but it's true.
 
2014-07-15 10:58:19 PM  

Rik01: And still, people pour into my city yearly. Traffic has become a nightmare. Decades old citrus groves have been sold and turned into housing complexes. Drainage ditches which used to run with shallow, clear water, like creeks and streams, now run with murky, dark waters, deeper and more foul

.

People were saying that about you when you showed up.
 
2014-07-15 11:00:39 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: MemeSlave: Move where the water is.

Californians would rather steal it from everyone else. And if it keeps them away from me I'd call that a fair exchange.


Why do Texans hate Californians so much? I've been living in Austin for a year and that's all I hear is how Californians are ruining the city single-handedly.
 
2014-07-15 11:01:04 PM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By ...

cdn.hark.com
 
2014-07-15 11:01:17 PM  

iheartscotch: ScaryBottles: Well I'll grab my spears and buckler.....

I will also be offering unconditional protection for any Texas residents skilled in blacksmithing who want it.

Sooo; we're gonna turn Aiel? Fun times!



Half of those ginger bastards should have died of melanomas of the eyeballs.
 
2014-07-15 11:02:31 PM  

Kumana Wanalaia: "Only after the last tree has been cut down. Only after the last river has been poisoned. Only after the last fish has been caught. Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten."

― Cree Indian Prophecy


So money can be eaten? Well hell, the 1% is solid then. What are we worrying about again?
 
2014-07-15 11:03:48 PM  
Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

Rik, I could have written your post.
I moved out of SoFla as soon as I could, and made a vow to use no chemicals in whatever agricultural enterprise I worked.
Well, that didn't last. You can't produce squat anymore without some help from ADM or Monsanto.

/still use no chems on the vegetables
//hand clean the veggie plants, takes about three hours a day during the season to groom them
///but dayum, citrus is chemical and water intensive
 
2014-07-15 11:08:51 PM  

Stone Meadow: HeadLever: Stone Meadow: Of that, only 4.4 MAF...or about 5% comes from the Colorado River,

True, but that 4.4MAF is about 27% of the total appropriated water for this river.  California has the largest 'right' of any single state for Colorado River water.

Of course we do, but of the 7 states sharing the Colorado River drainage California has 38 million people, versus Colorado (5.2 million), Utah (2.9m), Wyoming (0.6m), Arizona (6.6m) and Nevada (2.8m) for a total of 18 million non-Californians sharing the USA's share of the water, so I figure we're getting screwed out of half our share.

Screwed or not, them's the cards dealt at the Colorado River Compact of 1922, and it will take an Act of God to change it.

Meanwhile, folks who claim we are somehow "stealing" other State's water are full of shiat.



Not to mention the complete screwing that Mexico gets in that whole thing.  Mexicali gets the driest, nubbliest sip off the bled-out aquifers down near the delta where it supposedly reaches the Sea of Cortez.
 
2014-07-15 11:11:31 PM  
At least here in NM, we know we're in a desert, and act, at least most of us, accordingly.Even my dson knows, when he goes out, to carry a water bottle with him.
 
2014-07-15 11:22:54 PM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.

Each one dumped 80 lbs of salt brine onto the ground a week from the back flushing process. Consider the average rural block had 20 houses on it. That's 6400 lbs of salt a month. Salt does not go away. Rains wash it into the ground, where it begins to infiltrate the water table.

Consider also that those 20 houses have 20 below ground septic systems, each pumping X-number of gallons of effluent into the soil daily. The effluent needs some place to go and the more that gets dumped in a concentrated area, the more space it needs and the more condensed it becomes.

Eventually it starts to get into the water supply and drain off into ditches, which drain into the local lagoon and, suddenly, during the summer, the waters there carry a dangerous load of human fecal bacteria, forcing the city to close it down.

By the 80's commercial fishing in the lagoon had to be stopped by the government because they were stripping the place clean of everything. In the 60's, you could go fishing there for a day and bring home enough fresh seafood, crabs, clams and oysters to feed a family of five for a week.

By the middle 80's -- you were lucky to catch enough for one meal. Plus, the city warned you when it was wise to leave shellfish alone due to fecal pollution levels.

By ...


Your post is awesome read in this voice:

img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-15 11:24:53 PM  
I was having this discussion with a friend the other day: while water prices here in the Cleveland area increase above a certain level of consumption and vary based on how high above Lake Erie you live (pumping costs), they're still ridiculously cheap.  We did the math and the highest possible rate for 2015 comes out to 8/10 of a cent per gallon.  That's less than a penny per gallon to water your lawn or wash your car with  drinkable water that the rest of world is willing to kill each other over.

/just another thing to be very thankful for
//LeBron gets it
 
2014-07-15 11:26:07 PM  
Hi, Texas... Michigan here, `Just wanted to say you can't have our water. Enjoy your big state.
 
2014-07-15 11:38:16 PM  
So of I just show up in Mexico will they take care of me?

/I'd like $77,000, a permanent place to stay, right to vote myself more bennies, etc.
 
2014-07-15 11:38:47 PM  

Colour_out_of_Space: Meanwhile, (also) in Texas...

[s.newsweek.com image 240x167]


OMFGs I want to see a Mark XXXIII Bolo run that thing over and smush it flat.
 
2014-07-15 11:41:07 PM  

wildcardjack: HeadLever: wildcardjack: Bound to be practical somewhere.

It is practical, just not economical in many circumstances when you compare it to most available sources of fresh water. Desal through distillation has been used forever, but it is energy intensive.

The idea is desal through using the sea water as the working fluid in a solar plant. Solar combined power and water is the soup rain.


I'm pretty sure seawater as a working fluid isn't a good idea in basically every use.
 
2014-07-15 11:45:01 PM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.....

Too many people in a limited space with limited resources can cause a major disaster, yet politicians, bribed by wealthy land owners and businessmen, encourage more and more people to settle in because they bring in big profits.

BTW. 40 years back, Florida did not have the huge amount of sinkholes it now has -- caused by the lowering of the underground water levels. Folks fill them in and keep building and keep sucking water out of the ground.

Now, Texas has begun to recognize it's own stupidity, after it got too late. Folks there have been yelling for decades over water abuse and also been ignored.

We had better get into space soon and start bleeding off large amounts of the population before there is no one left.


I just want to tell you that I always enjoy your posts, even if they are about depressing things.
 
2014-07-15 11:46:58 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.


I grew up drinking some of the best well water around, and have since spent time in some places where the water reeked of sulphur or something something more...organic.  I came to appreciate the cheapest store-brand bottled water.  So sue me.
 
2014-07-15 11:53:26 PM  

jiggs: And yet we are sucking millions if gallons of water from the ground and injecting it back into wells for natural gas. Too bad we can't drink dollar bills.


That's ok.  The oceans are rising, so if we pump some into the ground, it is no big deal.
 
2014-07-15 11:57:23 PM  

iheartscotch: I keep saying that Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Texas should pool resources and build several massive desalination plants on the Gulf of Mexico and pipe in water. But, it won't happen till the Oglala is tapped out.


If you are going to invest that much why not tap some large river that may be nearby, sure it would have to be filtered but that may be easier than desalination.
 
2014-07-16 12:00:53 AM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: [media.tumblr.com image 500x272]

DURKA DUR!


---- Came for some sort of TERK ER JERBS!!!
Leaving satisfied, no longer caring.
 
2014-07-16 12:08:30 AM  

jst3p: vudukungfu: Mentat: It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...

did he live in Vermont?
'cause we're good

Colorado here, we are OK too.


You mean this Colorado?
 
2014-07-16 12:10:25 AM  

Ex-Texan: At least here in NM, we know we're in a desert, and act, at least most of us, accordingly.Even my dson knows, when he goes out, to carry a water bottle with him.


I was glad to see that the residents of Alamogordo didn't have lawns, but the town does have a golf course.  NO!  BAD!
 
2014-07-16 12:13:09 AM  
This is why I don't live near a farking desert. I have a house in Wisconsin, and a second home right on the shore of Lake Superior in Michigan. You couldn't pay me enough to get me to live in a desert.
 
2014-07-16 12:14:28 AM  

jst3p: Colorado here, we are OK too.


Bite your tongue!

More people keep trickling in.  The HOA's mandate luxurious lawns of thirsty grass that doesn't belong here.  And barring the most fortuitous and unlikely form of climate change, the amount of precipitation isn't going to increase.
 
2014-07-16 12:19:35 AM  

Stone Meadow: Meanwhile, folks who claim we are somehow "stealing" other State's water are full of shiat.


Mexico, on the other hand.......
 
2014-07-16 12:23:45 AM  
I remember hearing back in the 80's how we were sucking the midwest aquifers dry. Thirty years later I have no sympathy. They knew it was coming. They knew how to mitigate or avoid it.
 
2014-07-16 12:25:15 AM  
www.prlog.org

/Giant sucking sound.
 
2014-07-16 12:40:46 AM  

DrunkWithImpotence: DoctorWhat: rustypouch: I've been assured by Fark Independents that the free market guarantees the best outcomes.

Why would this be any different?

Free market only works well when the costs are borne by the producers at about the same time and place as the product is made.  Then they pass the costs on to the consumer, and if another producer finds a better way or place, the free market selects them.  But if the costs aren't part of the initial process, then the market is skewed towards those that would use resources and produce as quickly and cheaply as possible, even if everyone ends up paying more (for federal disaster aid, etc.) as a result.

It's called the Tragedy of the Commons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons ) and is hardly a new idea.  If there is a common shared resource, people will tend to over-use that resource for personal gain to the detriment of the general good.


Interestingly, it doesn't always work that way. The original example - Everyone puts so many sheep on the land that they destroy it - was used by landowners at the time to justify closing the Commons and throwing the peasants out of their homes. It turned out the lairds were LESS productive over the long term. The traditional system had strict, sometimes deadly enforcement mechanisms to make sure nobody would sacrifice the productivity of the land for personal gain.
 
2014-07-16 12:45:06 AM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.

And I still get told I'm nuts or got too many onions on my belt.

I first took note in Florida, where, as a kid, we mostly ran off individual water wells in my rural area and the water table was so high that digging three feet down often brought seepage. Only one house that I knew of in the city had a real basement -- due to the water table -- and it was on the barrier island in a high spot.

When the population tripled, people found they had to drive their wells deeper and the water was not as good. So, naturally, water softeners were coming into their own and nearly everybody had one.


Preach it, Brother Jeremiah!
/Favorited.
 
2014-07-16 12:47:09 AM  
We don't need water. We have Brawndo!
 
2014-07-16 12:47:17 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Soon...
 
2014-07-16 12:55:40 AM  

star_topology: Adolf Oliver Nipples: MemeSlave: Move where the water is.

Californians would rather steal it from everyone else. And if it keeps them away from me I'd call that a fair exchange.

Why do Texans hate Californians so much? I've been living in Austin for a year and that's all I hear is how Californians are ruining the city single-handedly.


They may not be aware of Austin's tech industry, which attracts Silicon Valley types, or Texas's more lenient business environment that has been luring companies away from California.
 
2014-07-16 01:05:28 AM  
They will figure a way:


3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-16 01:07:11 AM  

MisterTweak: Raider_dad: So we have had an underground version of the Aral Sea.

FTFY.

A lot of Texas' prosperity over the last couple decades has been possible due to plentiful, nearly-free water. Which is basically gone now.

Anyone here visit Lake Travis in the last, say, half-decade or so? Not quite as horrific as Lake Mead yet, but heading there. The water level is down by almost 40 feet, and unlike previous droughts, this one isn't short-lived, it's been decreasing steadily for almost a decade, and despite fairly drastic measures, shows little hope of returning to the levels seen over the last 50 years.


Lake Travis is actually a pretty good measuring stick for how the Colorado River is doing. We won't see it full again until Lake Austin (or whatever they call it now) doesn't need any, and Lake Marble Falls has too much. In my 26 years I've seen it flood Hwy 1431 three times at the Cow Creek inlet, but last summer I waded all the way to the south bank without getting my knees wet. Good to see another Travis Co. Farker. I live in Aggieland, but my family has land on the "peninsula" across from the Pedernales River inlet.
 
2014-07-16 01:40:07 AM  
A 2013 study published in Environmental Science and Technology looked at past and projected water use for fracking in the Barnett, Eagle Ford, and Haynesville shale plays in Texas, and found that fracking in 2011 was using more than twice as much water in the state as it was three years earlier. In Dimmit County, home to the Eagle Ford shale development in South Texas, fracking accounted for nearly a quarter of overall water consumption in 2011 and is expected to grow to a third in a few years, according to the study

"Each drill site requires between 3 and 5 million gallons of water per frack"

"Generally, 2-8 million gallons of water may be used to frack a well."

So 4-5 million gallons of water per well. Texas has at least 1600 wells and counting in Dimmit County.

That's seven billion two hundred million gallons of water for one county.


You are letting corporations and the wealthy take your water supplies from you.
cdn.memegenerator.net
 
2014-07-16 01:43:54 AM  

Rik01: It's ironic, but everything I have been yelling and ranting about caused by over population, for years, is starting to show up.


The problem isn't overpopulation, the problem is lack of foresight and unwillingness to invest in efficiency.
In theory there is more than enough water and food for a few billion people more.

Most people have no idea how hopelessly inefficiently our food is being produced and our resources are being used. The technology is quite simply already there to do it differently, we're just not doing it yet.

Probably the most advanced country in the world when it comes to food production is the Netherlands. The country is about the size of New Hampshire, very densily populated, and still manages to be the world's third largest exporter of vegetables and fruit after the USA and France.  For a large part thanks to an area the size of manhattan covered completely with the highest technology greenhouses.

Feeding the world is no problem at all, if you produce the right products in the right places with the right technology, eat a little meat and fish, and rely on potatoes as a staple (needs less water) instead of rice and wheat.
 
2014-07-16 02:07:22 AM  
Disclaimer: I live in the desert. No, not Texas - think drier, more juniper.

What this story, and several others like it (like, say,  Rik01's) point to is that, no, we can't live like it's 1950's coastal Pennsylvania everywhere in the country, even if we have the technology to fake it from time to time like we did from the '60s to the '80s. Sure, we have the technology to "smooth out the consumption curve", if you will - we can irrigate when it's dry, like they did in Texas and like they do near where I live (curiously, the Newlands Project was named after a guy, not because it's eponymous with its primary function), but at some point, we have to make sure that, when it's wetter, we're putting some of the water  back. No amount of concrete or technology will change the fact that, at a certain point, there are limits to what a local environment will support. It's taking us a while to learn that lesson, but we're getting there.

To be fair, it doesn't help that we thought we had a lot more water than we really do - the Colorado River Compact, for example, was drawn up after a particularly wet period that just happened to correspond to the arrival of American immigrants into the West (this also led to the disastrous "Rain follows the plow" policy that decimated Oklahoma and Texas in the '30s), and it wasn't the only body of water rights legislation that was drawn up during that time period. It also doesn't help that, until the Green Revolution came along, our willingness and ability to grow anything anywhere, damn the cost, made it possible for us to stave off starvation and provide diet variety for a large chunk of the world. We still have that role, of course, but it's nowhere near as urgent as it was before South America's political situation stabilized (that's where a lot of your winter fruits and veggies come from now) and India and China became more or less self-sufficient. We're also getting smarter about water - fewer lawns and planted trees in the Southwest, lower flow toilets and showers, less water intensive crops (Arizona and Nevada both used to grow a lot more cotton than they do now). There's still a long ways to go; Americans still use more water per capita than anyone else, but we're getting better.
 
2014-07-16 02:25:54 AM  

CruJones: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: KarmicDisaster: I like the way that they are "pumping the last drops". Then they can try shootin the ground.

Everyone in Texas is against conservation of water, because it would cost jobs.

Hey, here in San Antonio we do really well actually. I think the same amount of water as when the city was half the size, ever since they found the blind salamander we have to be gentle with our aquifer. Really.

/we are building a new desalination plant too


It was either crank the taps back on the Edwards, or be well and truly screwed.  Medina Lake is pretty much empty, the Trinity Aquifer is not much more than a piss stream in the overall scheme of things, and Canyon Lake isn't much more than that. That, and they finally learned that a wide open 48" Artesian well also didn't do much for keeping the aquifer levels at a reasonable level.
 
2014-07-16 02:43:57 AM  
Derrrr derrr durrrrrr
 
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