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(NBC News)   That giant sucking sound you hear is Texas water going south. They took our dihydrogen monoxide   (nbcnews.com) divider line 210
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13121 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2014 at 8:04 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-15 05:12:34 PM  
The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

Yes, the story is about farming, but damn we waste a lot of water in other ways.
 
2014-07-15 05:43:14 PM  

Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.


The bottled water market is a drop in the bucket compared to the demand coming from cities in the southwest.  Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.
 
2014-07-15 05:49:23 PM  
Fort Hood shut down yesterday, because they didn't have any water.  This ain't good.
 
2014-07-15 05:52:12 PM  
I know who can get some water for them...


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-15 05:53:27 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

The bottled water market is a drop in the bucket compared to the demand coming from cities in the southwest.  Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.


Not in California is doesn't.  Nestle's Arrowhead is pumping water from aquifers out in the desert, and because the land is owned by Native American tribes, there's zero oversight as to how much water they are taking.

http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/07/12/nestle-ar ro whead-tapping-water/12589267/
 
2014-07-15 05:54:57 PM  
The Tragedy of the Commons is a story we will play out repeatedly until we are all dead.
 
2014-07-15 06:10:29 PM  
media.tumblr.com

DURKA DUR!
 
2014-07-15 06:17:12 PM  

Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

Yes, the story is about farming, but damn we waste a lot of water in other ways.


Or we could encourage people to move out of the farking desert.

/just a thought.
 
2014-07-15 06:37:10 PM  
The article mentioned pivot irrigation which is a HUGE waste. A lot of the (cotton) farmers on the South Plains are transitioning to underground drip systems. The water usage drops dramatically and any applications such as fertilizer or systemic pest control are done through the piping. It's not cheap by any stretch but the yields are nothing short of phenomenal. In all honesty I am not sure how this type of irrigation would work for other row crops like corn ( a big culprit) and I am pretty positive that it would not work for something like sugar beets but folks best start paying attention.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-15 06:44:32 PM  
The farmers remind me of the fishermen in my area. Apparently the lobster industry used to be good at conservation, but the fish industry is all about what can be caught this trip.  And so the commercial fishing industry in New England is dead. Still twitching, but dead.
 
2014-07-15 06:53:08 PM  

Dancin_In_Anson: The article mentioned pivot irrigation which is a HUGE waste.


Better than flood irrigation, that they do out here in California despite the drought.  Something like 80% of the water use in California goes to agriculture, and because the water is subsidized, its so cheap that they'd rather flood a grove of trees than use drip or other more efficient irrigation methods.  Of course, it would also help if they didn't plant water hungry plants like Almond Trees or rice as well, but that's apparently where the money is.
 
2014-07-15 07:39:24 PM  
Looks like somebody's been neglecting the moisture farm again.

philosophyforchange.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-15 07:41:47 PM  

Dancin_In_Anson: The article mentioned pivot irrigation which is a HUGE waste. A lot of the (cotton) farmers on the South Plains are transitioning to underground drip systems. The water usage drops dramatically and any applications such as fertilizer or systemic pest control are done through the piping. It's not cheap by any stretch but the yields are nothing short of phenomenal. In all honesty I am not sure how this type of irrigation would work for other row crops like corn ( a big culprit) and I am pretty positive that it would not work for something like sugar beets but folks best start paying attention.


It doesn't work well for corn... partly due to volume, and partly because it's much more effective on minimum and no-till crops.

Also, I know most of the people in that article, including T. Boone McClownstick. The guy from Vega is just a dirt farmer who grows as much for insurance as for forage. He has a bitty little farm.
 
2014-07-15 07:41:54 PM  
Looks like they done freedomed themselves real good
 
2014-07-15 07:44:29 PM  
It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...
 
2014-07-15 08:08:20 PM  
www.betterlivingthroughbeowulf.com
Frowns on your modern dust bowl.
 
2014-07-15 08:09:00 PM  
jaypgreene.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-15 08:09:08 PM  
I like the way that they are "pumping the last drops". Then they can try shootin the ground.
 
2014-07-15 08:12:01 PM  
Isn't the planned route of the Keystone XL pipeline right over this aquifer?
 
2014-07-15 08:12:07 PM  
This sentiment is also reflected in the state's water law, based on the concept of "right to capture." In short, if you own the land, you and only you own the water.

Ah yes, that corollary of the sacred "I got mine, f*ck you." rule.
 
2014-07-15 08:15:19 PM  
And yet we are sucking millions if gallons of water from the ground and injecting it back into wells for natural gas. Too bad we can't drink dollar bills.
 
2014-07-15 08:16:47 PM  
"Only after the last tree has been cut down. Only after the last river has been poisoned. Only after the last fish has been caught. Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten."

― Cree Indian Prophecy
 
2014-07-15 08:20:20 PM  
If only someone had pointed out decades ago that natural resources are not infinite.
 
2014-07-15 08:21:10 PM  

Mentat: It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...


did he live in Vermont?
'cause we're good
 
2014-07-15 08:21:21 PM  

Rabid Badger Beaver Weasel: Looks like somebody's been neglecting the moisture farm again.

[philosophyforchange.files.wordpress.com image 300x400]


That kid's useless. Mouthy, too
 
2014-07-15 08:21:48 PM  
"We got our faith in the Good Lord," says Schur. "He's the one who provides. He's the one who determines what we're going to make ... But, you know, he's certainly testing our patience."


Hey, maybe he did provide, and expected us to care for what he provided - as with responsible use it could last a very long time.... But then we let the proudly ignorant (and let's face it, mostly "right-wing") among us actually turn people who want to use our natural resources responsibly (and not fark up every square inch of land we can see) in to a farking slur against one another.  And let them set economic policies up which encourages irresponsible, damaging behavior.
 
2014-07-15 08:24:30 PM  

KarmicDisaster: I like the way that they are "pumping the last drops". Then they can try shootin the ground.




Everyone in Texas is against conservation of water, because it would cost jobs.
 
2014-07-15 08:24:52 PM  
Move where the water is.
 
2014-07-15 08:28:55 PM  

vudukungfu: Mentat: It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...

did he live in Vermont?
'cause we're good


Colorado here, we are OK too.
 
2014-07-15 08:29:45 PM  
So we have an underground version of the Aral Sea.
 
2014-07-15 08:31:05 PM  

MemeSlave: Move where the water is.


Californians would rather steal it from everyone else. And if it keeps them away from me I'd call that a fair exchange.
 
2014-07-15 08:31:18 PM  
That giant sucking sound you hear is Texas water going south.

Actually I don't hate Texas, but it just seemed funnier to fix the headline
 
2014-07-15 08:33:29 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Marcus Aurelius: Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

The bottled water market is a drop in the bucket compared to the demand coming from cities in the southwest.  Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.

Not in California is doesn't.  Nestle's Arrowhead is pumping water from aquifers out in the desert, and because the land is owned by Native American tribes, there's zero oversight as to how much water they are taking.

http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/07/12/nestle-ar ro whead-tapping-water/12589267/


Yikes.
 
2014-07-15 08:33:30 PM  

Kumana Wanalaia: "Only after the last tree has been cut down. Only after the last river has been poisoned. Only after the last fish has been caught. Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten."

― Cree Indian Prophecy


LOLOLOL.

no
 
2014-07-15 08:33:41 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Marcus Aurelius: Brontes: The EPA should come down on bottled water companies like a ton of bricks for wasting resources, both water and vast amounts of fuel.

The bottled water market is a drop in the bucket compared to the demand coming from cities in the southwest.  Bottled water itself is retarded, but it comes from places where water is cheap and plentiful.

Not in California is doesn't.  Nestle's Arrowhead is pumping water from aquifers out in the desert, and because the land is owned by Native American tribes, there's zero oversight as to how much water they are taking.

http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2014/07/12/nestle-ar ro whead-tapping-water/12589267/


this.
 
2014-07-15 08:33:46 PM  
"The American Breadbasket" sounds like a buffet where fat teabaggers stuff their pieholes with a parking lot full of Tahoes and F150s.
 
2014-07-15 08:33:55 PM  

Lsherm: Or we could encourage people to move out of the farking desert.

/just a thought.


That's true for say, Las Vegas, but the people eating the food aren't just in Texas.  From a purely economic point of view, as long as it's cheaper to produce in Texas than New York, you produce in Texas.  When Texas dries up, you move on to states with more rain (maybe the Pacific Northwest?).  Of course, it may be more expensive there, and the companies that dried the plains out may not have to pay for any side effects like dust bowl conditions, except their land values dropping, but in the long run, smarter, and regulated use of the aquifer is still probably easier than moving the entire farming industry.  Yes, that may well include GMOs.
 
2014-07-15 08:34:02 PM  
Ogallala is my second favorite word to repeat endlessly.

My favorite is Zoltán Kodály

We have farked this thing up completely. Salinization, over pumping, every kind of herbicide and pesticide, industrial chemicals. You name we farked it. What a country.
 
2014-07-15 08:34:48 PM  
and yet the red river (northern) and the Mississippi flood almost every year... why not divert the excess to the aquifer ?
 
2014-07-15 08:36:10 PM  
Here is an idea, Don't farm a farking desert!
 
2014-07-15 08:36:45 PM  
so in the end they'll just have sand?

www.inpapasbasement.com
 
2014-07-15 08:40:24 PM  

Raider_dad: So we have had an underground version of the Aral Sea.


FTFY.

A lot of Texas' prosperity over the last couple decades has been possible due to plentiful, nearly-free water. Which is basically gone now.

Anyone here visit Lake Travis in the last, say, half-decade or so? Not quite as horrific as Lake Mead yet, but heading there. The water level is down by almost 40 feet, and unlike previous droughts, this one isn't short-lived, it's been decreasing steadily for almost a decade, and despite fairly drastic measures, shows little hope of returning to the levels seen over the last 50 years.
 
2014-07-15 08:40:35 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: KarmicDisaster: I like the way that they are "pumping the last drops". Then they can try shootin the ground.

Everyone in Texas is against conservation of water, because it would cost jobs.


Hey, here in San Antonio we do really well actually. I think the same amount of water as when the city was half the size, ever since they found the blind salamander we have to be gentle with our aquifer. Really.

/we are building a new desalination plant too
 
2014-07-15 08:42:13 PM  
I don't want to live in that area because it rains and snows, but I want their water...

I'll gladly sell my house where there is ungodly amounts of fresh water readily available. For double what I paid. And I'm keeping the snow blower.
 
2014-07-15 08:42:51 PM  
I keep saying that Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Texas should pool resources and build several massive desalination plants on the Gulf of Mexico and pipe in water. But, it won't happen till the Oglala is tapped out.
 
2014-07-15 08:44:39 PM  

jst3p: vudukungfu: Mentat: It seems like only days ago some Farker was mocking the idea of running out of water...

did he live in Vermont?
'cause we're good

Colorado here, we are OK too.


Yeah?

http://cwcb.state.co.us/water-management/water-supply-planning/Pages/ T heWaterSupplyGap.aspx
 
2014-07-15 08:47:58 PM  
Whaddaya say, Hollis?
 
2014-07-15 08:49:18 PM  
Pray harder Texans.
 
2014-07-15 08:49:50 PM  
Well I hope you all know that eventually all the water will drain down to Antarctica anyway.
 
2014-07-15 08:50:11 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Better than flood irrigation, that they do out here in California despite the drought.


Actually, flood irrigation is much better in many cases.  Much less loss to evaporation.  What is mostly lost via flood irrigation is through infiltration into the ground.  However, this infiltration oftentimes is a huge recharge source for aquifers.
 
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