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(Science Daily)   Archaeologists say massive elephant ancestor once roamed free in North America where early inhabitants found it intimidating, delicious   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 22
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1517 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jul 2014 at 4:38 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-15 03:37:58 PM  
There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.
 
2014-07-15 04:47:02 PM  
gomphothere

is that like a gothapottamus?
 
2014-07-15 04:55:56 PM  
Where a gompo?
 
2014-07-15 05:08:07 PM  

dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.


Yup...came to point this out. Now, to fix TFA..."The members of the Clovis culture were already well-known as hunters of the gomphotheres' cousins, mammoths and mastodons, as well as every other four legged creature the encountered wherever they went. "
 
2014-07-15 05:23:05 PM  
I seem to recall some indian (native american) word for a mastodon . . . pasnuta or some such ('long-nose').  the stories told of it being rather large, fed people for half the year, etc.

\\ could be a twisted dream
\ neat concept though.
 
2014-07-15 05:41:38 PM  

Stone Meadow: dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.

Yup...came to point this out. Now, to fix TFA..."The members of the Clovis culture were already well-known as hunters of the gomphotheres' cousins, mammoths and mastodons, as well as every other four legged creature the encountered wherever they went. "



Now, they have become elephants:

kencrow.us
 
2014-07-15 05:41:45 PM  
Well I done seen everything when I see an elephant fry!
 
2014-07-15 05:44:33 PM  

Mantour: Stone Meadow: dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.

Yup...came to point this out. Now, to fix TFA..."The members of the Clovis culture were already well-known as hunters of the gomphotheres' cousins, mammoths and mastodons, as well as every other four legged creature the encountered wherever they went. "

Now, they have become elephants:

[kencrow.us image 850x508]


Snert!
 
2014-07-15 05:52:32 PM  
Gomphothere jerky is only good off the youngsters.  Those suckers get tough after three or four years.
 
2014-07-15 05:57:06 PM  

dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.


Yeah, but how many of us have died in the attempts?  Are we that good or just that numerous (which, in the end, may be the same thing)?
 
2014-07-15 06:30:07 PM  
Everyone loved their ribs!

i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-15 06:42:15 PM  

dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.


Lots of African megafauna (which convolved with humans) is hard to kill and hasn't been wiped out.

I favor the "blitzkrieg"  theory of the peopling of the Americas. The ancestors came from Beringia where they had to be primarily meat eaters.

Heading south they encountered huge animals with no instinctive fear which they killed, ate, and when made locally extinct moved on to new hunting grounds. It was the wave of extinctions that caused the rapid spread of humans.

Only later did the native Americans have to switch to a harder living where they needed to learn how to catch more difficult prey and eat plants. Even then there were many living easy - witness the huge shell mounds around the US.
 
2014-07-15 06:46:32 PM  
Can't wait til we start cloning mammoths again just for their tasty meat. Mmm... grass fed wooly mammoth burgers.

/mammoth... bacon?
//sorry, not taxidermically
 
2014-07-15 07:53:32 PM  

2wolves: Gomphothere jerky is only good off the youngsters.  Those suckers get tough after three or four years.


actually, the 'tougher' the meat, the better the jerky you make. (the less fat the better, and you're going for the 'chew' factor, too)

I have a friend whose Clydesdale died at the grand age of 22. I made 'chuck-cut' jerky for everyone in my extended family, using my own hinkelhatz-chili seasoning, and everyone loved it - the extra chew factor made it even better.

/yeah, 'here on fark, every thread can be a food thread'
//Horse chucksteak, cubedand slowcooked to make a chili con carne, is one of the best dishes I've ever cooked.
 
2014-07-15 07:58:57 PM  

fawlty: dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

That's just how good we are.

Yeah, but how many of us have died in the attempts?  Are we that good or just that numerous (which, in the end, may be the same thing)?


Well, I would submit that we are that numerous because we are that good.

As to how many died in the attempt? Well, obviously some, but over all the rewards were enough to make the risks worthwhile, or you and I wouldn't be here.
 
2014-07-15 08:00:57 PM  

HairBolus: dittybopper: There is no species of megafauna that man has come across that he hasn't been able to kill with just a pointed stick.

Lots of African megafauna (which convolved with humans) is hard to kill and hasn't been wiped out.

I favor the "blitzkrieg"  theory of the peopling of the Americas. The ancestors came from Beringia where they had to be primarily meat eaters.

Heading south they encountered huge animals with no instinctive fear which they killed, ate, and when made locally extinct moved on to new hunting grounds. It was the wave of extinctions that caused the rapid spread of humans.

Only later did the native Americans have to switch to a harder living where they needed to learn how to catch more difficult prey and eat plants. Even then there were many living easy - witness the huge shell mounds around the US.


That's true about the African megafauna, but nonetheless we humans still managed to kill them. They just managed to reach a sort of equilibrium.
 
2014-07-15 08:15:29 PM  
i137.photobucket.com
 
2014-07-15 08:49:20 PM  
Archaeologists Paleontologists say massive elephant ancestor once roamed free in North America where early inhabitants found it intimidating, delicious

FTFY, subby and article writer

/sorry, pet peeve
 
2014-07-15 10:15:27 PM  
In Hot Springs, South Dakota you can see a hole full of bones of mammoths who discovered the hard way that their feet were not great for climbing out of that hole.
 
2014-07-15 11:10:48 PM  

uttertosh: actually, the 'tougher' the meat, the better the jerky you make.


Was just going for the humor.  Obvious failure.
 
2014-07-15 11:28:31 PM  

HairBolus:
I favor the "blitzkrieg"  theory of the peopling of the Americas. The ancestors came from Beringia where they had to be primarily meat eaters.

Heading south they encountered huge animals with no instinctive fear which they killed, ate, and when made locally extinct moved on to new hunting grounds. It was the wave of extinctions that caused the rapid spread of humans.

Only later did the native Americans have to switch to a harder living where they needed to learn how to catch more difficult prey and eat plants. Even then there were many living easy - witness the huge shell mounds around the US.


Thanks, I'd never heard of the shell mounds before. You're correct. There were many, from coast to coast. And massive.
Good times
 
2014-07-16 11:29:15 PM  

tinyarena: HairBolus:
I favor the "blitzkrieg"  theory of the peopling of the Americas. The ancestors came from Beringia where they had to be primarily meat eaters.

Heading south they encountered huge animals with no instinctive fear which they killed, ate, and when made locally extinct moved on to new hunting grounds. It was the wave of extinctions that caused the rapid spread of humans.

Only later did the native Americans have to switch to a harder living where they needed to learn how to catch more difficult prey and eat plants. Even then there were many living easy - witness the huge shell mounds around the US.

Thanks, I'd never heard of the shell mounds before. You're correct. There were many, from coast to coast. And massive.
Good times


The technical name for them is "middens".
 
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