If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(KOLO TV Reno)   Anyone here know CPR? Just me, eh? Well then let's do this   (kolotv.com) divider line 46
    More: Hero  
•       •       •

8557 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2014 at 10:00 PM (13 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-15 09:06:42 PM  
img4.wikia.nocookie.net

Does not know if approve
 
2014-07-15 10:04:32 PM  
Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.
 
2014-07-15 10:07:23 PM  

ArkAngel: [img4.wikia.nocookie.net image 439x461]

Does not know if approve


Done in one. Thanks.
 
2014-07-15 10:07:34 PM  
The American Red Cross training videos on CPR are horribly painful to watch, but it is important stuff to know.
 
2014-07-15 10:07:53 PM  

Salmon: Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.


And there are apps that can coach you through the steps if it's been a long time since you had the training.
 
2014-07-15 10:11:30 PM  
The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?
 
2014-07-15 10:12:38 PM  
Does anybody else find it weird that the story doesn't even report on the kid?  Who they are, or at the very least if the kid made it?  Why the hell does the article only care about the dude who performed CPR?  Not to take anything away from him, but it's really friggin' odd.
 
2014-07-15 10:15:10 PM  
livinginmycar.com
 
2014-07-15 10:16:18 PM  

big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?


They don't advise to do that they have just decided to accept that no one carries pocket masks and will not lip lock a stranger to save their lives
 
2014-07-15 10:16:42 PM  

ByOwlLight: Does anybody else find it weird that the story doesn't even report on the kid?  Who they are, or at the very least if the kid made it?  Why the hell does the article only care about the dude who performed CPR?  Not to take anything away from him, but it's really friggin' odd.


I think it was inferred from the article that the kind may not speak English... so, ya know.... i742.photobucket.com
 
2014-07-15 10:19:15 PM  
annie annie can you breathe!?!?!

cdn5.movieclips.com
 
2014-07-15 10:19:29 PM  
You mean not everyone has to go through cpr and AED certification every 2 years?
Huh.
 
2014-07-15 10:22:01 PM  

big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?


No more mouth to mouth
/Except for drowning victims
 
2014-07-15 10:22:38 PM  
More important than CPR is recognizing drowning.  Drowning doesn't look like you think it looks, and is completely silent.   I'd bet this kid was drowning in plain sight, and nobody recognized it until it was almost too late.  Kudos to the CPR provider.
 
2014-07-15 10:23:03 PM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?

They don't advise to do that they have just decided to accept that no one carries pocket masks and will not lip lock a stranger to save their lives


It not the lip locking, it's the victim vomiting into my mouth I have issues with

/have performed actual CPR on a "living" person
//he didn't make it but we gave it a dam good try
 
2014-07-15 10:26:07 PM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?

They don't advise to do that they have just decided to accept that no one carries pocket masks and will not lip lock a stranger to save their lives

It not the lip locking, it's the victim vomiting into my mouth I have issues with

/have performed actual CPR on a "living" person
//he didn't make it but we gave it a dam good try


Yeah that's one of the issues along with hep-c I carry a jump kit in all my vehicles each with a pocket mask. I haven't had to find out if that check valve really is puke proof
 
2014-07-15 10:30:10 PM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Herr Flick's Revenge: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?

They don't advise to do that they have just decided to accept that no one carries pocket masks and will not lip lock a stranger to save their lives

It not the lip locking, it's the victim vomiting into my mouth I have issues with

/have performed actual CPR on a "living" person
//he didn't make it but we gave it a dam good try

Yeah that's one of the issues along with hep-c I carry a jump kit in all my vehicles each with a pocket mask. I haven't had to find out if that check valve really is puke proof


I had the luxury of a fully stocked ER, so I cheated by using a bag.
Still had to do compressions.
 
2014-07-15 10:43:21 PM  
Me and some co-workers who are all trained tried to save someone inside a blast furnace two days before Thanksgiving in 2011. The first thing you do when somebody goes down is check your meters to make sure you are not being gassed. Our personal meters and the stationary meters were not going off so we did the chest compressions and mouth to mouth while somebody grabbed the AED. The guy did not make it and we later learned it was a massive heart attack so he never really had a chance. By time we strapped him to the board and carried him down six flights of stairs he was dead.
 
2014-07-15 10:43:53 PM  

ByOwlLight: Does anybody else find it weird that the story doesn't even report on the kid?  Who they are, or at the very least if the kid made it?  Why the hell does the article only care about the dude who performed CPR?  Not to take anything away from him, but it's really friggin' odd.


HIIPA or whatever the acronym is called might also enter into it. Disclosing information on someone's medical condition without permission is a privacy violation. Add in that they are probably a minor and it is better to just not say anything.
 
2014-07-15 10:45:50 PM  
Did it seem odd to anyone else that he had to think of his extended family's kids in order to muster the desire to help the drowned kid?
Maybe it was just poorly worded.
He put in work.
The proof is in the pudding, but I found it an odd motivator.
 
2014-07-15 10:48:38 PM  
CPR. It saves lives.

No joke. Learn it.
 
2014-07-15 10:58:47 PM  

Salmon: Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.


As a matter of fact we did have a mandatory CPR class in the middle school I went to 20 years ago.


TurboCojones: More important than CPR is recognizing drowning.  Drowning doesn't look like you think it looks, and is completely silent.   I'd bet this kid was drowning in plain sight, and nobody recognized it until it was almost too late.  Kudos to the CPR provider.


Well dammit, don't leave us hanging.  What should we be looking for?
 
2014-07-15 11:01:13 PM  

Salmon: Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.


In my High School health class I was the only one certified in CPR (I was a lifeguard for both the city and the YMCA), so I got to teach CPR to the rest of the class because our "health" teacher was -- I shiat you not -- a 400 lb. whale of a woman who couldn't have done CPR without the aid of a forklift and an overhead bridge crane. It took this woman 20 minutes to get out of a chair; forget about kneeling on the ground.

I don't know how this woman ever qualified as an instructor. I later taught many CPR classes, both for the American Red Cross and the City of Los Angeles; I was an instructor-trainer, meaning I trained the instructors, and I never would have passed someone who wasn't physically capable of performing CPR, just as I wouldn't have certified someone in Advanced Lifesaving (also an instructor-trainer) who couldn't swim.
 
2014-07-15 11:04:51 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: Salmon: Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.

In my High School health class I was the only one certified in CPR (I was a lifeguard for both the city and the YMCA), so I got to teach CPR to the rest of the class because our "health" teacher was -- I shiat you not -- a 400 lb. whale of a woman who couldn't have done CPR without the aid of a forklift and an overhead bridge crane. It took this woman 20 minutes to get out of a chair; forget about kneeling on the ground.

I don't know how this woman ever qualified as an instructor. I later taught many CPR classes, both for the American Red Cross and the City of Los Angeles; I was an instructor-trainer, meaning I trained the instructors, and I never would have passed someone who wasn't physically capable of performing CPR, just as I wouldn't have certified someone in Advanced Lifesaving (also an instructor-trainer) who couldn't swim.


It's pretty random you mentioned overhead cranes. I work on bridge (EOT/elect. overhead traveling) cranes and my company and most steel mills require at least one person per crew be trained in first aid/cpr/osha 30.
 
2014-07-15 11:06:00 PM  
Not worth it. Getting sued and wasting time defying a good natural culling of the weak. Besides, if the illegals couldn't speak English that's a just reward for refusing to learn the language of the country they have invaded.

Learn English. It saves lives in America.
 
2014-07-15 11:06:46 PM  
Ditto! Learn CPR! My father went into cardiac arrest on a university campus last fall. Two students applied CPR until the paramedics arrived. He made a complete recovery, and the Red Cross honored the students a few months ago.
 
2014-07-15 11:09:42 PM  
http://mariovittone.com/2010/05/154/

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are in the water:
Head low in the water, mouth at water level
Head tilted back with mouth open
Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
Eyes closed
Hair over forehead or eyes
Not using legs - Vertical
Hyperventilating or gasping
Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
Trying to roll over on the back
Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder.

Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled, before speech occurs.
Drowning people's mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people's mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.
Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water's surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.
Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.
From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people's bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.
 
2014-07-15 11:11:59 PM  

Omahawg: annie annie can you breathe!?!?!

[cdn5.movieclips.com image 666x360]


LOL, those "Anatomical Annies" were really weird.

cdn.dotmed.com

In one rather large class I team-taught with three other lifeguards, one of the female students, instead of tapping Annie on the shoulder and saying "Annie, Annie, are you okay?", smacked Annie soundly upside the head and shouted out "What up, homegirl? You be lookin' ill."

It busted the whole class up. The expression caught on, and lifeguards who weren't even there started using it in training sessions.

Ah. Good times.
 
2014-07-15 11:14:30 PM  

jimmydageek: Appear to be climbing an invisible ladder.


That is eerie.
 
2014-07-15 11:20:28 PM  

merrillvillain: Danger Avoid Death: Salmon: Everyone should learn basic first aid and CPR in highschool in  my opinion, even junior high for you farkers who only made it that far.

In my High School health class I was the only one certified in CPR (I was a lifeguard for both the city and the YMCA), so I got to teach CPR to the rest of the class because our "health" teacher was -- I shiat you not -- a 400 lb. whale of a woman who couldn't have done CPR without the aid of a forklift and an overhead bridge crane. It took this woman 20 minutes to get out of a chair; forget about kneeling on the ground.

I don't know how this woman ever qualified as an instructor. I later taught many CPR classes, both for the American Red Cross and the City of Los Angeles; I was an instructor-trainer, meaning I trained the instructors, and I never would have passed someone who wasn't physically capable of performing CPR, just as I wouldn't have certified someone in Advanced Lifesaving (also an instructor-trainer) who couldn't swim.

It's pretty random you mentioned overhead cranes. I work on bridge (EOT/elect. overhead traveling) cranes and my company and most steel mills require at least one person per crew be trained in first aid/cpr/osha 30.


I used to work for an industrial auctioneer, and was on a jobsite where this idiot was dismantling a bridge crane to be shipped back to Texas from a plant in California that had closed. Instead of carefully dismantling the thing, he just cut the rails and ran the bridge off, letting it plummet 100 feet or so to the ground. This guy had two riggers quit on him in one week because he almost killed them.
 
2014-07-15 11:29:27 PM  
I thought CPR was only if there's no pulse. Sounds like he was or should have been doing artificial respiration (AR) instead? I thought the chest compressions in CPR were primarily just to keep the blood circulating in the body and to the brain until a defibrillator shows up to kickstart the heart. Is that all just called CPR now? I learned water lifesaving in the 80s so maybe I'm out of date now.

I just hope the hero made sure to follow step one and shake the kid and yell at him to make sure he wasn't simply sleeping before the mouth to mouth.
 
2014-07-15 11:33:50 PM  
At least the people in Texas don't have to worry about drowning so they've got that going for them, which is nice.
/Too soon?
 
2014-07-15 11:34:41 PM  

MIRV888: Did it seem odd to anyone else that he had to think of his extended family's kids in order to muster the desire to help the drowned kid?
Maybe it was just poorly worded.
He put in work.
The proof is in the pudding, but I found it an odd motivator.


Nah, he was just telling a story. Maybe it crossed his mind during the incident; I think we can assume he wasn't pondering all this during the rescue effort. It's probably just how he made sense of everything afterwards.
 
2014-07-15 11:36:06 PM  

sat1va: I thought CPR was only if there's no pulse. Sounds like he was or should have been doing artificial respiration (AR) instead? I thought the chest compressions in CPR were primarily just to keep the blood circulating in the body and to the brain until a defibrillator shows up to kickstart the heart. Is that all just called CPR now? I learned water lifesaving in the 80s so maybe I'm out of date now.

I just hope the hero made sure to follow step one and shake the kid and yell at him to make sure he wasn't simply sleeping before the mouth to mouth.


If you can't find a pulse, there is no pulse. What he's describing, "gurgling breaths" is probably either air being sucked back into the lungs as a result of negative pressure from the CPR, or a distressing phenomenon known as agonal respiration, in which the brainstem activates the diaphragm but the lungs are not actually working. Either way, CPR is indicated because despite the appearance of breathing, there is no circulation.

And if you're sleeping with  your lungs full of water, very likely you aren't sleeping, QED.
 
2014-07-15 11:53:14 PM  

thismomentinblackhistory: MIRV888: Did it seem odd to anyone else that he had to think of his extended family's kids in order to muster the desire to help the drowned kid?
Maybe it was just poorly worded.
He put in work.
The proof is in the pudding, but I found it an odd motivator.

Nah, he was just telling a story. Maybe it crossed his mind during the incident; I think we can assume he wasn't pondering all this during the rescue effort. It's probably just how he made sense of everything afterwards.


FTFA:  " The lady that was speaking English knelt down and helped me. So I started doing CPR. She was doing the breaths, so I helped her through that by tilting his head back and telling her to do the breaths. After about 2 cycles, he pushed out quite a bit of water out of his nose and mouth. He got real gurgling breaths but they weren't consistent and they weren't hold on. So we kept going with CPR and kept going."

Sounds to me like the lady did the work-- "telling her to do the breaths"   Great when someone supervises and then gets the credit??
 
2014-07-16 12:07:00 AM  

big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?


I haven't read the thread totally because I'm sick and tired, literally, but no more breaths.  100 compressions per minute, or just keep the beat to the Bee Gees "Stayin Alive".
 
2014-07-16 12:43:33 AM  

Abaddon The Despoiler: Not worth it. Getting sued and wasting time defying a good natural culling of the weak. Besides, if the illegals couldn't speak English that's a just reward for refusing to learn the language of the country they have invaded.

Learn English. It saves lives in America.


That has some quality to it 7/10 even with no bites. Well done.
 
2014-07-16 12:45:55 AM  

sat1va: I thought CPR was only if there's no pulse. Sounds like he was or should have been doing artificial respiration (AR) instead? I thought the chest compressions in CPR were primarily just to keep the blood circulating in the body and to the brain until a defibrillator shows up to kickstart the heart. Is that all just called CPR now? I learned water lifesaving in the 80s so maybe I'm out of date now.

I just hope the hero made sure to follow step one and shake the kid and yell at him to make sure he wasn't simply sleeping before the mouth to mouth.


Laypeople are not taught to check for a pulse anymore. They did research which showed that laypeople were only able to detect a pulse 25-50% of the time, and many of the times they were saying there was one the person was actually pulseless. They are now taught to look for color and signs of life in non-healthcare provider CPR, such as AHA HeartSaver.

The potential harm by CPR on a patient not breathing but with a pulse is FAR outweighed by the benefit of starting CPR on a patient that might otherwise be missed.

CJHardin: I haven't read the thread totally because I'm sick and tired, literally, but no more breaths.  100 compressions per minute, or just keep the beat to the Bee Gees "Stayin Alive".


Another One Bites the Dust used to be on my MP3 player in the ambulance.
 
2014-07-16 12:47:48 AM  

big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?


When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.
 
2014-07-16 12:57:00 AM  

sjcousins: When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.


CPR is never done for hours to begin with, unless you're talking about doing resuscitative ECMO, which is quite literally cutting edge, space-age therapy for  certain causes of cardiac arrest. There are certain populations which benefit from longer-duration CPR, such as hypothermic or cold water drowning patients (Not dead until warm and dead) or drug overdoses, but in most populations 40-60 minutes pulseless with ongoing, high quality CPR is equivocal with a 0% chance at survival.

Paramedics and EMS in the United States, the UK, and Canada, are moving to working all cardiac arrests of a presumably medical, non-surgically interventionable cause in the field now, rather than dashing them to an ER to have the same things done and have them pronounced. The systems that have done so have seen 10-20% spikes in survival to discharge rates.

Basically put. We work them where they drop.
 
2014-07-16 01:18:34 AM  

hardinparamedic: sjcousins: When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.

CPR is never done for hours to begin with, unless you're talking about doing resuscitative ECMO, which is quite literally cutting edge, space-age therapy for  certain causes of cardiac arrest. There are certain populations which benefit from longer-duration CPR, such as hypothermic or cold water drowning patients (Not dead until warm and dead) or drug overdoses, but in most populations 40-60 minutes pulseless with ongoing, high quality CPR is equivocal with a 0% chance at survival.

Paramedics and EMS in the United States, the UK, and Canada, are moving to working all cardiac arrests of a presumably medical, non-surgically interventionable cause in the field now, rather than dashing them to an ER to have the same things done and have them pronounced. The systems that have done so have seen 10-20% spikes in survival to discharge rates.

Basically put. We work them where they drop.


My system's doing that too!  I think our current save rate for the year is 60% on anything that wasn't clearly a DOA.
 
2014-07-16 01:33:07 AM  

big pig peaches: The last I heard they advised only to do the chest compressions and skip the breaths. Is that still the recommendation?


Herr Flick's Revenge: It not the lip locking, it's the victim vomiting into my mouth I have issues with


Several reasons for this.

-People are more likely to try to do something if it doesn't involve mouth-on-stranger
-The vomit thing - yeah, it's pretty impossible to KEEP doing it
-Non-professionals usually take too long trying to do the breaths, and the interruption in compressions does more harm than the breaths help...  IF they even get any air into the lungs.

sat1va: I thought CPR was only if there's no pulse. Sounds like he was or should have been doing artificial respiration (AR) instead? I thought the chest compressions in CPR were primarily just to keep the blood circulating in the body ...


True, but non-professional people may have trouble finding the pulse or take too long trying to find it.  The delay is thought to do more harm than the risk of doing unnecessary compressions.  I guess the logic is if they aren't breathing, they're likely enough to not have a pulse (or won't for long) so it's better to get going on it.
 
2014-07-16 01:33:56 AM  

hardinparamedic: sjcousins: When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.

CPR is never done for hours to begin with, unless you're talking about doing resuscitative ECMO, which is quite literally cutting edge, space-age therapy for  certain causes of cardiac arrest. There are certain populations which benefit from longer-duration CPR, such as hypothermic or cold water drowning patients (Not dead until warm and dead) or drug overdoses, but in most populations 40-60 minutes pulseless with ongoing, high quality CPR is equivocal with a 0% chance at survival.

Paramedics and EMS in the United States, the UK, and Canada, are moving to working all cardiac arrests of a presumably medical, non-surgically interventionable cause in the field now, rather than dashing them to an ER to have the same things done and have them pronounced. The systems that have done so have seen 10-20% spikes in survival to discharge rates.

Basically put. We work them where they drop.


That is interesting.
The paramedic that trained us (Australia) told us not to stop CPR until paramedics arrived or you're physically unable to continue. He also told us the longest he'd personally performed CPR was 3 hours straight.
 
2014-07-16 02:09:33 AM  

sjcousins: hardinparamedic: sjcousins: When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.

CPR is never done for hours to begin with, unless you're talking about doing resuscitative ECMO, which is quite literally cutting edge, space-age therapy for  certain causes of cardiac arrest. There are certain populations which benefit from longer-duration CPR, such as hypothermic or cold water drowning patients (Not dead until warm and dead) or drug overdoses, but in most populations 40-60 minutes pulseless with ongoing, high quality CPR is equivocal with a 0% chance at survival.

Paramedics and EMS in the United States, the UK, and Canada, are moving to working all cardiac arrests of a presumably medical, non-surgically interventionable cause in the field now, rather than dashing them to an ER to have the same things done and have them pronounced. The systems that have done so have seen 10-20% spikes in survival to discharge rates.

Basically put. We work them where they drop.

That is interesting.
The paramedic that trained us (Australia) told us not to stop CPR until paramedics arrived or you're physically unable to continue. He also told us the longest he'd personally performed CPR was 3 hours straight.


I would think that if you had been doing CPR for three solid hours, rigor and/or dependent lividity would have set in, telling you it was okay to go ahead and stop.
 
2014-07-17 01:12:11 AM  

Gyrfalcon: sjcousins: hardinparamedic: sjcousins: When I recently did mine they said that although the breaths aren't as important as originally thought, or possibly not at all, it is extremely difficult to do CPR continuously for more than a 10 minutes. It's exhausting. CPR with breaths however, can be done for hours without stopping. Little breaks help.

CPR is never done for hours to begin with, unless you're talking about doing resuscitative ECMO, which is quite literally cutting edge, space-age therapy for  certain causes of cardiac arrest. There are certain populations which benefit from longer-duration CPR, such as hypothermic or cold water drowning patients (Not dead until warm and dead) or drug overdoses, but in most populations 40-60 minutes pulseless with ongoing, high quality CPR is equivocal with a 0% chance at survival.

Paramedics and EMS in the United States, the UK, and Canada, are moving to working all cardiac arrests of a presumably medical, non-surgically interventionable cause in the field now, rather than dashing them to an ER to have the same things done and have them pronounced. The systems that have done so have seen 10-20% spikes in survival to discharge rates.

Basically put. We work them where they drop.

That is interesting.
The paramedic that trained us (Australia) told us not to stop CPR until paramedics arrived or you're physically unable to continue. He also told us the longest he'd personally performed CPR was 3 hours straight.

I would think that if you had been doing CPR for three solid hours, rigor and/or dependent lividity would have set in, telling you it was okay to go ahead and stop.


As a guy who's done CPR inside and outside of a human body, I'll call BS on 3 hours without a break.  I might be able to rock 30 minutes on a good day.  That is an epic amount of time to be performing CPR.
 
2014-07-17 01:19:02 AM  

hardinparamedic: sat1va: I thought CPR was only if there's no pulse. Sounds like he was or should have been doing artificial respiration (AR) instead? I thought the chest compressions in CPR were primarily just to keep the blood circulating in the body and to the brain until a defibrillator shows up to kickstart the heart. Is that all just called CPR now? I learned water lifesaving in the 80s so maybe I'm out of date now.

I just hope the hero made sure to follow step one and shake the kid and yell at him to make sure he wasn't simply sleeping before the mouth to mouth.

Laypeople are not taught to check for a pulse anymore. They did research which showed that laypeople were only able to detect a pulse 25-50% of the time, and many of the times they were saying there was one the person was actually pulseless. They are now taught to look for color and signs of life in non-healthcare provider CPR, such as AHA HeartSaver.

The potential harm by CPR on a patient not breathing but with a pulse is FAR outweighed by the benefit of starting CPR on a patient that might otherwise be missed.

CJHardin: I haven't read the thread totally because I'm sick and tired, literally, but no more breaths.  100 compressions per minute, or just keep the beat to the Bee Gees "Stayin Alive".

Another One Bites the Dust used to be on my MP3 player in the ambulance.


I love it, but that's pretty dark.  Makes me feel at home!  Also, I'm going to work on a mashup of both of those songs.

/Difference between an ALS Unit and a porcupine?  All the pricks are on the outside of the porcupine!

//Difference between God and a Paramedic?  God doesn't think he's a paramedic.

//Shashies, cheers!
 
Displayed 46 of 46 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report